58th Primetime Emmy Awards

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58th Primetime Emmy Awards
The 58th Primetime Emmy Awards Poster.jpg
Promotional poster
Date
  • August 27, 2006
    (Ceremony)
  • August 19, 2006
    (Creative Arts Awards)
Location Shrine Auditorium,
Los Angeles, California
Presented by Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted by Conan O'Brien
Highlights
Most awards Elizabeth I (4)
Most nominations Grey's Anatomy (8)
Outstanding Comedy Series The Office
Outstanding Drama Series 24
Outstanding Limited Series Elizabeth I
Outstanding Competition Program The Amazing Race
Outstanding Variety Series The Daily Show with Jon Stewart
Television/radio coverage
Network NBC
Produced by Ken Ehrlich
Directed by Louis J. Horvitz

The 58th Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, August 27, 2006, at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, California on NBC at 8:00 p.m. ET (00:00 UTC) with Conan O'Brien hosting the show. The ceremony attracted 16.2 million viewers, 2.5 million fewer than the previous year's ceremony, but still the ratings winner for the week. [1] The Discovery Channel received its first major nomination this year.

Contents

This awards show was the first in fourteen years to be held in August because of NBC's request; because of NBC Sunday Night Football , the ceremony moved to accommodate NFL Kickoff Weekend.

A new voting system determined nominees in particular categories (mostly lead acting and outstanding series categories) by a "blue ribbon" panel of judges, which resulted in the exclusion of popular shows such as Desperate Housewives and Lost , and actors like Hugh Laurie from House . Lost's exclusion was mocked during the opening sequence (see below), when O'Brien, accompanied by Hugo "Hurley" Reyes, heads down a hatch to get to the Emmys. O'Brien asked Reyes if he wanted to come; Reyes says coyly, "Well, we weren't exactly invited", to which O'Brien replies "But you won last year!"

For its second season, The Office won Outstanding Comedy Series; this was its only major award. No comedy series won more than two major awards this year. In the drama field, 24 won Outstanding Drama Series for its fifth season, after being nominated and losing the previous four years. It was also the first time the Fox Network won this award. Its three major awards topped all drama series. Its Outstanding Lead Actor, Drama award (for Kiefer Sutherland) was also the first time Fox had won this award.

Ellen Burstyn was nominated for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie for her role in Mrs. Harris , even though she was onscreen for only fourteen seconds, which caused controversy.

The show that received the most major nominations was Grey's Anatomy , with eight. The top-nominated show had not received so few nominations since 1970, when Marcus Welby, M.D. received six. However, there were far fewer nominations back then, with most categories having three slots making this ceremony unique.

The pilot episode of My Name Is Earl joined a select group of TV episodes to win for both directing and writing.

Winners and nominees

Winners are listed first and highlighted in bold: [2]

Tony Shalhoub, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series winner Tony Shalhoub (1).jpg
Tony Shalhoub, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series winner
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series winner Julia Louis-Dreyfus VF 2012 Shankbone 3.jpg
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series winner
Kiefer Sutherland, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series winner Kiefer Sutherland 2 SDCC 2014.jpg
Kiefer Sutherland, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series winner
Mariska Hargitay, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series winner Mariska Hargitay 2011.jpg
Mariska Hargitay, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series winner
Andre Braugher, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner Andre Braugher 2011 (cropped).jpg
Andre Braugher, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Helen Mirren, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner Helen Mirren 2014.jpg
Helen Mirren, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Jeremy Piven, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series winner JeremyPivenFeb09.jpg
Jeremy Piven, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series winner
Megan Mullally, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series winner Megan Mullally by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Megan Mullally, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series winner
Alan Alda, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series winner Alan Alda by Bridget Laudien.jpg
Alan Alda, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series winner
Blythe Danner, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series winner Blythe Danner - 1980.jpg
Blythe Danner, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series winner
Jeremy Irons, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner Jeremy Irons - Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - 2013.jpg
Jeremy Irons, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Kelly Macdonald, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner KellyMacdonald07TIFF.jpg
Kelly Macdonald, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Barry Manilow, Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program winner BarryManilow.jpg
Barry Manilow, Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program winner

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety, Music, or Comedy Series Outstanding Variety, Music, or Comedy Special
Outstanding Made for Television Movie Outstanding Miniseries
Outstanding Reality-Competition Program

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie

Supporting performances

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie

Directing

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Directing for a Variety, Music or Comedy Program Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Dramatic Special

Writing

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Writing for a Variety, Music, or Comedy Program Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Dramatic Special
  • The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, (Comedy Central)
    • The Colbert Report, (Comedy Central)
    • Late Night with Conan O'Brien, (NBC)
    • Late Show with David Letterman, (CBS)
    • Real Time with Bill Maher, (HBO)

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
By program

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
By program
Notes
  1. 1 2 "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

Opening sequence and subsequent controversy

The plane crash Lost parody

The opening sequence of the 58th Primetime Emmy Awards show depicted host Conan O'Brien wearing a tuxedo, sitting in luxury on a plane, sipping champagne and mentioning to the flight attendant that this would be the second Emmy's ceremony that he would be hosting. O'Brien then rhetorically asked the flight attendant, "What could possibly go wrong?" Immediately after that, the plane began to experience turbulence and then was portrayed as having crashed on (or near) an island. O'Brien is then seen walking ashore on the beach and onto the island still wearing his (now drenched) tuxedo. Hurley appears and then follows O'Brien to a hatch. When O'Brien asks if he wants to come along, Hurley says that they "weren't exactly invited". O'Brien enters the hatch and arrives on the set of The Office .

The intention of this opening sequence was to parody the premise of the ABC series Lost . However, the sequence reportedly disturbed some viewers because of the Comair Flight 5191 disaster that had occurred earlier in the day. Cincinnati NBC affiliate WLWT-TV had the unfortunate coincidence of running a "Breaking News" scroll about the crash at the same time as the scene was airing. [3]

Entertainment industry critics, such as LA Weekly columnist Nikki Finke, lambasted NBC's decision to not pull the plane crash portion of the opening sequence, in light of the aforementioned crash earlier that day. Finke stated that she believed NBC could have—with relative ease—instructed their writers to come up with a different sketch at the last minute, which could have been used as a substitute.

Other parodies

The skit also parodied shows such as The Office , 24 , House , South Park , and Dateline NBC (specifically, the "To Catch a Predator" segments). An animated Tom Cruise from the South Park episode "Trapped in the Closet" appears in a skit where an animated O'Brien hides in Stan Marsh's closet, only to run away when he discovers Cruise has already occupied the closet.

Tributes

The show featured tributes to two TV legends: Dick Clark ("America's Oldest Teenager"), and Aaron Spelling, producer of such classic TV shows as Dynasty and Beverly Hills, 90210 . The former tribute was presented by Simon Cowell, American Idol judge, with a performance by Barry Manilow, who won a Primetime Emmy Award later that evening. Joan Collins, Heather Locklear, and Stephen Collins, along with the original three Charlie's Angels , gave the tribute for Spelling.

In Memoriam

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References

  1. "Entertainment – Los Angeles Times". latimes.com.
  2. Emmys.com list of 2006 Nominees & Winners
  3. Recording of 2006 Emmy Award opening with a "Breaking News" scroll of a real life plane crash (Youtube). August 27, 2006. Retrieved May 25, 2020.