68-pounder Lancaster gun

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"A Quiet Day in the Diamond Battery", 15 December 1854, by William Simpson. Depicts naval guns deployed ashore in the Crimean War. 68 pounder Lancaster gun 1854.jpg
"A Quiet Day in the Diamond Battery", 15 December 1854, by William Simpson. Depicts naval guns deployed ashore in the Crimean War.

68-pounder Lancaster guns were a British rifled muzzle-loading cannon of the 1850s that fired a 68-pound shell. [1] They were fitted in pairs to the Arrow-class gunvessel. [1] The cannon was designed with an oval bore and had a range of about 6500 yards. [2] The gun had a tendency to burst. [3]

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References

  1. 1 2 Preston, Antony; Major, John (2007). Send a Gunboat The Victorian Navy and Supremacy at Sea, 1854–1904. Conway Maritime. p. 20. ISBN   978-0-85177-923-2.
  2. Lambert, Andrew D. (1991). The Crimean War: British grand strategy, 1853–56. Manchester University Press. p. 28. ISBN   978-0-7190-3564-7.
  3. Preston, Antony; Major, John (2007). Send a Gunboat The Victorian Navy and Supremacy at Sea, 1854–1904. Conway Maritime. p. 30. ISBN   978-0-85177-923-2.