83rd Academy Awards

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83rd Academy Awards
83rd Academy Awards poster.jpg
Official poster
DateFebruary 27, 2011
Site Kodak Theatre
Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Hosted by James Franco
Anne Hathaway [1]
Preshow hosts Tim Gunn
Maria Menounos
Robin Roberts
Krista Smith [2]
Produced by Bruce Cohen
Don Mischer [3]
Directed byDon Mischer [3]
Highlights
Best Picture The King's Speech
Most awards Inception and The King's Speech (4)
Most nominationsThe King's Speech (12)
TV in the United States
Network ABC
Duration3 hours, 16 minutes [4]
Ratings37.9 million
21.2% (Nielsen ratings) [5]

The 83rd Academy Awards ceremony, organized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 2010 in the United States and took place on February 27, 2011, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles beginning at 5:30 p.m. PST (8:30 p.m. EST). During the ceremony, Academy Awards (commonly called the Oscars) were presented in 24 competitive categories. The ceremony was televised in the United States by ABC, and produced by Bruce Cohen and Don Mischer, with Mischer also serving as director. [6] [7] Actors James Franco and Anne Hathaway co-hosted the ceremony, marking the first time for each. [8]

Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences honorary organization of film professionals

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a professional honorary organization with the stated goal of advancing the arts and sciences of motion pictures. The Academy's corporate management and general policies are overseen by a Board of Governors, which includes representatives from each of the craft branches.

In the year 2010, there was a dramatic increase and prominence in the use of 3D-technology in filmmaking after the success of Avatar in the format, with releases such as Alice in Wonderland, Clash of the Titans, Jackass 3D, all animated films, with numerous other titles being released in 3D formats.

Dolby Theatre live entertainment theatre in Los Angeles in the United States

The Dolby Theatre is a live-performance auditorium in the Hollywood and Highland Center shopping mall and entertainment complex, on Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue, in the Hollywood district of Los Angeles. Since its opening on November 9, 2001, the theater has been the venue of the annual Academy Awards ceremony. It is adjacent to the Grauman's Chinese Theatre and the El Capitan Theatre nearby on Hollywood Boulevard.

Contents

In related events, the Academy held its second annual Governors Awards ceremony at the Grand Ballroom of the Hollywood and Highland Center on November 13, 2010. [9] On February 12, 2011, in a ceremony at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, the Academy Awards for Technical Achievement were presented by host Marisa Tomei. [10]

The Governors Awards presentation is an annual award ceremony hosted by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), at the Grand Ballroom of the Hollywood and Highland Center, in the Hollywood district of Los Angeles, California. Three awards that signify lifetime achievement within the film industry – the Academy Honorary Award, the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, and the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award – are presented at this ceremony. The first Governors Awards ceremony was held on November 14, 2009. Prior to this, these three awards were formally presented during the main Academy Awards ceremony, which now conducts a short mention and appearance of the awards recipients after displaying a montage of the Governors Awards presentation. In the years since, the awards have gained prominence as a major red-carpet destination and industry event.

Hollywood and Highland Center shopping mall and entertainment complex at Los Angeles

The Hollywood & Highland Center is a shopping mall and entertainment complex at Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue in the Hollywood district in Los Angeles. The 387,000-square-foot (36,000 m2) center also includes TCL Chinese Theatre and the Dolby Theatre, home to the Academy Awards. The historic site was once the home of the famed Hollywood Hotel. Located in the heart of Hollywood, along the Hollywood Walk of Fame, it is among the most visited tourist destinations in Los Angeles.

Beverly Wilshire Hotel architectural structure

The Beverly Wilshire Beverly Hills , commonly known as the Beverly Wilshire Hotel, is a historic luxury hotel in Beverly Hills, California. Located at the intersection of Wilshire Boulevard and Rodeo Drive, it was completed in 1928. It has been used as a shooting location for films and television series. Guests have included US presidents and celebrities. Rooms begin at $825 per night, Suites begin at $1,500 per night.

Inception and The King's Speech won four awards each with the latter film winning Best Picture. [11] [12] [13] Other winners included The Social Network with three awards, Alice in Wonderland , The Fighter , and Toy Story 3 , with two awards, and Black Swan , God of Love , In a Better World , Inside Job , The Lost Thing , Strangers No More , and The Wolfman with one. The telecast garnered almost 38 million viewers in the United States.

<i>Inception</i> 2010 film directed by Christopher Nolan

Inception is a 2010 science fiction action film written, co-produced, and directed by Christopher Nolan, and co-produced by Emma Thomas. The film stars Leonardo DiCaprio as a professional thief who steals information by infiltrating the subconscious, and is offered a chance to have his criminal history erased as payment for the implantation of another person's idea into a target's subconscious. The ensemble cast additionally includes Ken Watanabe, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Marion Cotillard, Ellen Page, Tom Hardy, Dileep Rao, Cillian Murphy, Tom Berenger, and Michael Caine.

<i>The Kings Speech</i> 2010 British film directed by Tom Hooper

The King's Speech is a 2010 historical drama film directed by Tom Hooper and written by David Seidler. Colin Firth plays the future King George VI who, to cope with a stammer, sees Lionel Logue, an Australian speech and language therapist played by Geoffrey Rush. The men become friends as they work together, and after his brother abdicates the throne, the new king relies on Logue to help him make his first wartime radio broadcast on Britain's declaration of war on Germany in 1939.

The Academy Award for Best Picture is one of the Academy Awards (Oscars) presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) since the awards debuted in 1929. This award goes to the producers of the film and is the only category in which every member of the Academy is eligible to submit a nomination and vote on the final ballot. Best Picture is the final award of the night and is considered the most prestigious honor of the ceremony.

Winners and nominees

The nominees for the 83rd Academy Awards were announced on January 25, 2011, at 5:38 a.m. PST at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills, California by Tom Sherak, president of the Academy, and actress Mo'Nique. [14] The King's Speech led the nominations with twelve, followed by True Grit with ten. [15] [16]

Pacific Time Zone North American time zone

The Pacific Time Zone (PT) is a time zone encompassing parts of western Canada, the western United States, and western Mexico. Places in this zone observe standard time by subtracting eight hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC−08:00). During daylight saving time, a time offset of UTC−07:00 is used.

The Samuel Goldwyn Theatre is a screening-only movie theater named after filmmaker Samuel Goldwyn.

Beverly Hills, California City in California

Beverly Hills is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. Located within 5.7 square miles and surrounded by the cities of Los Angeles and West Hollywood, the City has an estimated population of 35,000.

The winners were announced during the awards ceremony on February 27, 2011. [17] [18] Toy Story 3 became the third animated film to be nominated for Best Picture. [19] [20] True Grit was the second film after 2002's Gangs of New York to lose all ten of its nominations. [21] By virtue of his nomination for Best Actor in 127 Hours , host James Franco became the first person since Paul Hogan, who was a co-host and a Best Original Screenplay nominee during the 59th ceremony in 1987, to host the ceremony while receiving a nomination in the same year. [22] [23] He was also the first acting nominee since Michael Caine at the 45th ceremony in 1973 to achieve this distinction. [24] With Christian Bale and Melissa Leo's respective wins in the Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress categories, The Fighter became the first film since 1986's Hannah and Her Sisters to win both supporting acting categories. [25]

<i>Toy Story 3</i> 2010 American animated film directed by Lee Unkrich

Toy Story 3 is a 2010 American computer-animated comedy-drama film produced by Pixar Animation Studios for Walt Disney Pictures. It is the third installment in Pixar's Toy Story series, and the sequel to 1999's Toy Story 2. It was directed by Lee Unkrich, the editor of the first two films and the co-director of Toy Story 2, written by Michael Arndt, while Unkrich wrote the story along with John Lasseter and Andrew Stanton, respectively director and co-writer of the first two films.

<i>True Grit</i> (2010 film) 2010 film directed by Ethan and Joel Coen

True Grit is a 2010 American Revisionist Western film directed, written, produced, and edited by the Coen brothers and executively produced by Steven Spielberg. It is the second adaptation of Charles Portis' 1968 novel of the same name, which was previously released in 1969 starring John Wayne and Glen Campbell. This version stars Hailee Steinfeld as Mattie Ross and Jeff Bridges as Deputy U.S. Marshal Reuben J. "Rooster" Cogburn, along with Matt Damon, Josh Brolin, and Barry Pepper.

<i>Gangs of New York</i> 2002 film directed by Martin Scorsese

Gangs of New York is a 2002 American epic period drama film directed by Martin Scorsese, set in the New York slums, and inspired by Herbert Asbury's non-fiction book, The Gangs of New York. The screenplay was by Jay Cocks, Steven Zaillian, and Kenneth Lonergan. The film stars Leonardo DiCaprio, Daniel Day-Lewis and Cameron Diaz.

Awards

Tom Hooper, Best Director winner Tom Hooper - Flickr - Eva Rinaldi Celebrity and Live Music Photographer (1).jpg
Tom Hooper, Best Director winner
Colin Firth, Best Actor winner Colin Firth by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg
Colin Firth, Best Actor winner
Natalie Portman, Best Actress winner Natalie Portman Thor 2 cropped.png
Natalie Portman, Best Actress winner
Christian Bale, Best Supporting Actor winner Christian Bale-7834.jpg
Christian Bale, Best Supporting Actor winner
Melissa Leo, Best Supporting Actress winner Melissa Leo at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival.jpg
Melissa Leo, Best Supporting Actress winner
Aaron Sorkin, Best Adapted Screenplay winner Aaron Sorkin at PaleyFest 2013.jpg
Aaron Sorkin, Best Adapted Screenplay winner
Lee Unkrich, Best Animated Feature winner Lee Unkrich cropped 2009.jpg
Lee Unkrich, Best Animated Feature winner
Susanne Bier, Best Foreign Language Film winner Susanne Bier.jpg
Susanne Bier, Best Foreign Language Film winner
Charles Ferguson, Best Documentary Feature co-winner Charles Ferguson (Representational Pictures, Inc.).jpg
Charles Ferguson, Best Documentary Feature co-winner
Rick Baker, Best Makeup co-winner Rick Baker at Saturn Awards.jpg
Rick Baker, Best Makeup co-winner

Winners [26] are listed first, highlighted in boldface, and indicated with a double-dagger (Double-dagger-14-plain.png).

Honorary Academy Awards

The Academy held its Second Annual Governors Awards ceremony on November 13, 2010, during which the following awards were presented. [27] [28] [29]

Academy Honorary Award

  • Kevin Brownlow For the wise and devoted chronicling of the cinematic parade.
  • Jean-Luc Godard For passion. For confrontation. For a new kind of cinema.
  • Eli Wallach For a lifetime's worth of indelible screen characters.

Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award

Films with multiple nominations and awards

The following six films received multiple awards:

AwardsFilm
4 Inception
The King's Speech
3
The Social Network
2 Alice in Wonderland
The Fighter
Toy Story 3

Presenters and performers

The following individuals presented awards or performed musical numbers. [30] [31]

Presenters

Name(s)Role
Tom Kane [32] Announcer for the 83rd Academy Awards
Tom Hanks Presenter of the awards for Best Art Direction and Best Cinematography
Kirk Douglas Presenter of the award for Best Supporting Actress
Mila Kunis & Justin Timberlake Presenters of the awards for Best Animated Short Film and Best Animated Feature Film
Javier Bardem & Josh Brolin Presenters of the awards for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Original Screenplay
Russell Brand & Helen Mirren Presenters of the award for Best Foreign Language Film
Reese Witherspoon Presenter of the award for Best Supporting Actor
Tom Sherak (AMPAS President)
Anne Sweeney (Disney–ABC Television Group President)
Presenters of a special presentation acknowledging the renewal of a television distribution contract between ABC and AMPAS
Hugh Jackman & Nicole Kidman Introducers of a medley of past film scores and presenters of the award for Best Original Score
Scarlett Johansson & Matthew McConaughey Presenters of the awards for Best Sound Mixing and Best Sound Editing
Marisa Tomei Presenter of the Academy Awards for Technical Achievement
Cate Blanchett Presenter of the awards for Best Makeup and Best Costume Design
Kevin Spacey Introducer of the performance of Best Original Song nominees "We Belong Together" and "I See the Light"
Amy Adams & Jake Gyllenhaal Presenters of the awards for Best Documentary (Short Subject) and Best Live Action Short Film
Oprah Winfrey Presenter of the award for Best Documentary Feature
Billy Crystal Introducer of a digital projection of previous host Bob Hope at the 25th Academy Awards
Bob Hope (archive footage/digital projection)Introducer of presenters Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law
Robert Downey Jr. & Jude Law Presenters of the awards for Best Visual Effects and Best Film Editing
Jennifer Hudson Introducer of the performance of Best Original Song nominees "If I Rise" and "Coming Home" and presenter of the award for Best Original Song
Halle Berry Presenter of the Lena Horne tribute
Kathryn Bigelow & Hilary Swank Presenters of the award for Best Director
Annette Bening Presenter of the Academy Honorary Awards and the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award
Jeff Bridges Presenter of the award for Best Actress
Sandra Bullock Presenter of the award for Best Actor
Steven Spielberg Presenter of the award for Best Picture

Performers

Name(s)RolePerformed
William Ross Musical arranger and conductorOrchestral
Anne Hathaway Performer"On My Own" from Les Misérables
Randy Newman Performer"We Belong Together'" from Toy Story 3
Zachary Levi
Alan Menken
Mandy Moore
Performers"I See the Light" from Tangled
A. R. Rahman
Florence Welch
Performers"If I Rise" from 127 Hours
Gwyneth Paltrow Performer"Coming Home" from Country Strong
Celine Dion Performer"Smile" during the annual In Memoriam tribute
PS22 Chorus Performers"Over the Rainbow" from The Wizard of Oz during the closing segment

Ceremony information

James Franco (Cropped).jpg
Anne Hathaway at MIFF.jpg
James Franco (left) and Anne Hathaway (right) co-hosted the 83rd Academy Awards

In June 2010, the AMPAS hired Oscar-winning producer Bruce Cohen and veteran television producer Don Mischer to oversee production of the telecast. [33] "I'm absolutely ecstatic that Bruce and Don have accepted my invitation to produce and direct the 83rd Academy Awards telecast," remarked Academy president Tom Sherak. "Their work in producing the Academy's inaugural Governors Awards was exceptional and I am confident they will bring their creative vision and extraordinary talent to produce/direct a most memorable Oscar show." [34] Opting for younger faces for the ceremony, Cohen and Mischer hired actor James Franco and actress Anne Hathaway as co-hosts of the 2011 ceremony. [35] "James Franco and Anne Hathaway personify the next generation of Hollywood icons — fresh, exciting and multi-talented. We hope to create an Oscar broadcast that will both showcase their incredible talents and entertain the world on February 27," said Cohen and Mischer regarding their selections to host the gala. "We are completely thrilled that James and Anne will be joining forces with our brilliant creative team to do just that." [36] Franco and Hathaway became the first male-female duo to co-host the awards show since comedian Jerry Lewis and actress Celeste Holm presided over the 29th ceremony in 1957. [23] [37] At age 28, Hathaway was also the youngest person to host an Oscar ceremony. [38]

Furthermore, AMPAS announced that this year's ceremony was "the most interactive awards show in history". The Academy revamped their official website oscar.com to include lists of all the nominees and winners, as well as film trailers and exclusive video content produced by both AMPAS and Oscar telecaster ABC. [39] Also, via the Academy's Twitter and Facebook pages, people could post questions for any actor or celebrity attending the festivities to answer. One of the four Oscar pre-show co-hosts would then pose selected questions to both nominees and attendees alike. [39] For a fee of US$4.99, users had online access to two dozen video streams that would take them from the red carpet, through the ceremony and on to the post-telecast Governors Ball. Several of the cameras utilized 360-degree views that viewers could direct. [40]

Several other people participated in the production of the ceremony. William Ross served as musical director and conductor for the ceremony. [41] Production designer Steve Bass built a new stage design for the ceremony. [42] Entertainment Weekly columnist and TV personality Dave Karger greeted guests entering the red carpet. [43] Designer Marc Friedland designed a new envelope heralding the winner of each category made from a high-gloss iridescent metallic gold paper stock, with red-lacquered lining that featured the Oscar statuette stamped in satin gold leaf. [44] [45] During the run-up to the ceremony, television personality Chris Harrison hosted "Road to the Oscars", a weekly behind-the-scenes video blog. [46] PS22 Chorus children's choir performed "Over the Rainbow" from The Wizard of Oz at the end of the ceremony. [47]

Box office performance of nominated films

For the second consecutive year, the field of major nominees included at least one blockbuster at the American and Canadian box offices. However, only three of the nominees had grossed over $100 million before the nominations were announced, compared with five from the previous year. [48] The combined gross of the ten Best Picture nominees when the Oscars were announced was $1.2 billion, the second-highest ever behind 2009. The average gross was $119.3 million. [49]

Two of the ten Best Picture nominees were among the top ten releases in box office during the nominations. At the time of the announcement of nominations on January 25, Toy Story 3 was the highest-grossing film among the Best Picture nominees with $414.9 million in domestic box office receipts. [50] The only other top ten box office hit to receive a nomination was Inception which earned $292.5 million. Among the remaining eight nominees, True Grit was the next-highest-grossing film with $137.9 million followed by The Social Network ($95.4  million), Black Swan $83.2 million, The Fighter ($72.6 million), The King's Speech ($57.3 million), The Kids Are All Right ($20.8 million), 127 Hours ($11.2 million), and finally Winter's Bone ($6.2 million). [50]

Of the top 50 grossing movies of the year, 55 nominations went to 15 films on the list. Only Toy Story 3 (1st), Inception (5th), How to Train Your Dragon (9th), True Grit (17th), The Social Network (29th), The Town (32nd), Black Swan (38th), and The Fighter (45th) were nominated for directing, acting, screenwriting, Best Picture or Animated Feature. [51] The other top-50 box office hits that earned nominations were Alice in Wonderland (2nd), Iron Man 2 (3rd), Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows — Part 1 (6th), Tangled (10th), Tron: Legacy (12th), Salt (21st), and Unstoppable (39th). [51]

Critical reviews

The show received a negative reception from most media publications. Film critic Roger Ebert said, "Despite the many worthy nominated films, the Oscarcast was painfully dull, slow, witless, and hosted by the ill-matched James Franco and Anne Hathaway. She might have made a delightful foil for another partner, but Franco had a deer-in-the-headlights manner and read his lines robotically." He went on to praise the winners of the night, but he ended his review with the words, "Dead. In. The. Water." [52] Television critic Tim Goodman of The Hollywood Reporter commented, "In what could go down as one of the worst Oscar telecasts in history, a bad and risky idea — letting two actors host — played out in spectacularly unwatchable fashion on the biggest of all nights for the film world." He also added, "These Oscars were a bore-fest that seemed to drag on relentlessly but listlessly." [53] Gail Pennington of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch wrote that the ceremony "felt a little like a bad night on Saturday Night Live  — awkward, slow and not particularly entertaining." Regarding the hosts, she quipped that Hathaway "at least tried", but she remarked, "Franco seemed half asleep, or possibly stoned." [54]

Some media outlets received the broadcast more positively. Entertainment Weekly television critic Ken Tucker stated that the show was "Funny, poised, relaxed, and smart, Anne Hathaway and James Franco made for marvelous Oscar hosts. Their combination of respect and informality struck the right tone for the night, a happily surprising production that had its share of fine moments both planned and ad-libbed." On the overall aspect of the ceremony, they concluded "all in all, it was a fun, briskly paced night." [55] Mary McNamara from the Los Angeles Times commented, "The two seemed to be following the directive to "first do no harm," as if they knew they couldn't score as big as Jimmy Fallon did with the Emmy Awards, but were determined to avoid becoming morning show fodder like Ricky Gervais was after this year's Golden Globes. The result was a show that moved along, with a few draggy bits and high notes, like precisely what it was: a very long and fancy awards show." Her review further said "Overall, the evening had an oddly business-like feel, a mind-numbing evenness that was exacerbated by the relentless predictability of the winners, and the fact that none of the acting winners were played off no matter how long their "thank-yous" went." [56]

Ratings and reception

The American telecast on ABC drew in an average of 37.9 million people over its length, which was a 9% decrease from the previous year's ceremony. [57] [58] An estimated 71.3 million total viewers watched all or part of the awards. [59] The show also drew lower Nielsen ratings compared to the two previous ceremonies, with 21.2% of households watching over a 33 share. [5] In addition, the program scored an 11.8 rating over a 30 share among the 18–49 demographic, which was a 12 percent decrease over last year's demographic numbers. [60] [61]

In Memoriam

The In Memoriam tribute, which featured Celine Dion performing the Charlie Chaplin song "Smile", paid tribute to the following individuals. [30] [62]

At the end of the montage, Halle Berry paid special tribute to Horne and introduced a film clip of her singing the titular song from the film Stormy Weather . [63]

See also

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The 79th Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 2006 and took place February 25, 2007, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles beginning at 5:30 p.m. PST / 8:30 p.m. EST. During the ceremony, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presented Academy Awards in 24 categories. The ceremony, televised in the United States by ABC, was produced by Laura Ziskin and directed by Louis J. Horvitz. Actress Ellen DeGeneres hosted for the first time. Two weeks earlier in a ceremony at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills, California held on February 10, the Academy Awards for Technical Achievement were presented by host Maggie Gyllenhaal.

80th Academy Awards

The 80th Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 2007 and took place on February 24, 2008, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles beginning at 5:30 p.m. PST / 8:30 p.m. EST. During the ceremony, AMPAS presented Academy Awards in 24 categories. The ceremony was televised in the United States by ABC, and produced by Gil Cates and directed by Louis J, Horvitz. Actor Jon Stewart hosted the show for the second time, having previously presided over the 78th ceremony held in 2006. Two weeks earlier in a gala at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills, California held on February 9, the Academy Awards for Technical Achievement were presented by host Jessica Alba.

82nd Academy Awards

The 82nd Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 2009 and took place on March 7, 2010, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles beginning at 5:30 p.m. PST / 8:30 p.m. EST. The ceremony was scheduled well after its usual late-February date to avoid conflicting with the 2010 Winter Olympics. During the ceremony, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presented Academy Awards in 24 categories. The ceremony was televised in the United States by ABC, and was produced by Bill Mechanic and Adam Shankman and directed by Hamish Hamilton. Actors Alec Baldwin and Steve Martin hosted the show. Martin hosted for the third time; he first presided over the 73rd ceremony held in 2001 and last hosted the 75th ceremony held in 2003. Meanwhile, this was Baldwin's first Oscars hosting stint. This was also the first telecast to have multiple hosts since the 59th ceremony held in 1987.

84th Academy Awards

The 84th Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 2011 in the United States and took place on February 26, 2012, at the Hollywood and Highland Center Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles beginning at 5:30 p.m. PST / 8:30 p.m. EST. During the ceremony, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presented Academy Awards in 24 categories. The ceremony was televised in the United States by ABC, and produced by Brian Grazer and Don Mischer, with Mischer also serving as director. Actor Billy Crystal hosted the show for the ninth time. He first presided over the 62nd ceremony held in 1990 and had last hosted the 76th ceremony held in 2004.

85th Academy Awards awards ceremony honoring the best films of 2012

The 85th Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 2012 and took place on February 24, 2013, at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles beginning at 5:30 p.m. PST / 8:30 p.m. EST. The ceremony was the first in the Academy's 85-year history to adopt the phrase "The Oscars" as the ceremony's official name during the broadcast and marketing. During the ceremony, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presented Academy Awards in 24 categories. The ceremony was televised in the United States by ABC, and produced by Craig Zadan and Neil Meron and directed by Don Mischer. Actor Seth MacFarlane hosted the show for the first time.

86th Academy Awards award ceremony

The 86th Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 2013 and took place on March 2, 2014, at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles beginning at 5:30 p.m. PST / 8:30 p.m. EST. The ceremony was scheduled well after its usual late-February date to avoid conflicting with the 2014 Winter Olympics. During the ceremony, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presented Academy Awards in 24 categories. The ceremony was televised in the United States by ABC, and produced by Neil Meron and Craig Zadan and directed by Hamish Hamilton. Actress Ellen DeGeneres hosted the show for the second time, having previously hosted the 79th ceremony held in 2007.

87th Academy Awards Awards ceremony

The 87th Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 2014 and took place on February 22, 2015, at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles beginning at 5:30 p.m. PST / 8:30 p.m. EST. During the ceremony, AMPAS presented Academy Awards in 24 categories. The ceremony was televised in the United States by ABC, produced by Neil Meron and Craig Zadan and directed by Hamish Hamilton. Actor Neil Patrick Harris hosted the ceremony for the first time.

91st Academy Awards award ceremony

The 91st Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 2018, and took place at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California. The ceremony was held on February 24, 2019. During the ceremony, AMPAS presented Academy Awards in 24 categories. The ceremony was televised in the United States by the American Broadcasting Company (ABC), produced by Donna Gigliotti and Glenn Weiss, with Weiss also serving as director. It was the first ceremony in three decades, since the 61st Academy Awards in 1989, to be conducted with no host.

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