A. K. Salim

Last updated
Ahmad Khatab Salim
Birth nameAlbert Atkinson
Also known asAhmad Kharab Salim
Born (1922-07-28) July 28, 1922 (age 98)
Chicago, Illinois, United States
Genres Jazz
Occupation(s)Arranger, composer, musician
InstrumentsAlto saxophone
Years active1939–65

Ahmad Khatab Salim or Ahmad Kharab Salim (born Albert Atkinson on July 28, 1922) was an American jazz composer, and arranger.

Contents

Biography

Salim attended DuSable High School with Bennie Green, Dorothy Donegan and Gene Ammons and played alto saxophone in King Kolax's band from 1938 to 1939 before working with Jimmy Raschel and Tiny Bradshaw. [1] He stopped playing after a jaw injury in 1943 and arranged music for the big bands of Lucky Millinder, Cab Calloway, Jimmy Lunceford, Lionel Hampton and Count Basie who recorded his composition "Normania" in 1949, and recorded it again in 1952 as "Blee Blop Blues". [2] Salim left music for a career in real estate from 1949 to 1956 but returned to write and arrange Latin jazz for Tito Puente, Machito, Dizzy Gillespie and others. [1] Salim released three albums under his leadership on Savoy Records in the late 1950s and recorded a further album for Prestige Records in 1964.

Discography

As leader

As arranger/composer

with Gene Ammons

With Count Basie

With Dizzy Gillespie

With Illinois Jacquet

With Machito

With Herbie Mann

With Phineas Newborn, Jr.

With Tito Puente

See also

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This is a Herbie Mann discography. Mann spent his early years recording for a number of jazz oriented record labels, and signed with Atlantic Records in 1961. He recorded with them through the 1960s and 1970s, including their subsidiary Cotillion Records, where he ran his own imprint, Embryo Records, in the 1970s, for his records as well as other musicians. Mann also ran two independent record labels, Herbie Mann Music in the 1980s, and during the 1990s, Kokopelli Records. Minor reissues are not noted.

References

  1. 1 2 Feather, Leonard (1960). The New Encyclopedia of Jazz. Horizon Press.
  2. Ginell, Cary (2014). The Evolution of Mann: Herbie Mann and the Flute in Jazz. Hal Leonard Corporation.