A. Roland Fields

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A. Roland Fields
Born(1900-06-13)June 13, 1900
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
DiedSeptember 11, 1950(1950-09-11) (aged 50)
Los Angeles, California, USA
Occupation Art director
Years active1942 - 1951

A. Roland Fields (June 13, 1900 September 11, 1950) was an American art director. He won an Academy Award and was nominated for another two in the category Best Art Direction. [1] He worked on 39 films between 1942 and 1951.

Contents

Selected filmography

Fields won one Academy Award and was nominated for two more for Best Art Direction:

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References

  1. "IMDb.com: A. Roland Fields - Awards". IMDb.com. Retrieved December 13, 2008.
  2. "The 18th Academy Awards (1946) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on July 6, 2011. Retrieved July 23, 2011.