AAU Men's Basketball All-Americans

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Modern day logo AAU Basketball All-American logo.gif
Modern day logo

The Amateur Athletic Union Men's Basketball All-Americans were players who competed in the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) between 1920–21 and 1967–68 and were chosen as the best players in the league during their respective seasons. [1] Founded in 1888, the Amateur Athletic Union is one of the largest non-profit, volunteer, sports organizations in the United States. It is dedicated exclusively to the promotion and development of amateur sports and physical fitness programs.

Contents

The era between 1921 and 1968 is referred to as the "Golden Era" of AAU basketball [2] while companies began vying for players to compete on their teams. [2] There was a great allure to playing AAU basketball besides job security; by remaining in the AAU as opposed to the National Basketball League or American Basketball Association, players were able to retain their "amateur" status. [1] Only amateurs were allowed to compete in the Olympic Games, and many AAU basketball alumni went on to compete for the United States during their careers.

During this time period, thirty-three AAU All-Americans played on the United States men's national basketball team in seven different Olympic Games: Joe Fortenberry, Carl Knowles, Frank Lubin, Art Mollner, Bill Wheatley (1936); [3] Don Barksdale, Bud Browning, Shorty Carpenter, Bob Kurland, R. C. Pitts, Cab Renick (1948); [4] Ron Bontemps, Bob Kurland, Frank McCabe, Dan Pippin, Howie Williams (1952); [5] Dick Boushka, Chuck Darling, Burdie Haldorson, Bob Jeangerard, K. C. Jones, Ron Tomsic, Gerry Tucker, Jim Walsh (1956); [6] Bob Boozer, Burdie Haldorson, Adrian Smith (1960); [7] Larry Brown, Les Lane, Jerry Shipp (1964); [8] and Mike Barrett, John Clawson, Calvin Fowler, Jim King and Mike Silliman (1968). [9]

Eleven AAU All-Americans have also been enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as players. These players include Roger Brown, [10] Ace Gruenig, [11] Richie Guerin, [12] Chuck Hyatt, [13] K. C. Jones, [14] Bob Kurland, [15] Hank Luisetti, [16] Jack McCracken, [17] Andy Phillip, [18] Jim Pollard, [19] and George Yardley. [20] Two other AAU All-Americans have been enshrined in other roles: Don Barksdale as a contributor [21] and Larry Brown as a coach. [22]

All-Americans by season

Most selections

Jimmy McNatt earned four All-America selections (1943-1946). Jimmy McNatt 39-40 Oklahoma.JPG
Jimmy McNatt earned four All-America selections (1943–1946).

This is a list for all of the All-Americans who received the honor at least three times.

10 selections
7–9 selections
6 selections
5 selections
4 selections
3 selections

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 Bradley, Robert (2011). "Amateur Athletic Union Basketball". APBR.org. The Association for Professional Basketball Research.
  2. 1 2 Grundman, Adolph (January 2004). "The Golden Age Of Amateur Basketball: The AAU Tournament, 1921–1968". University of Nebraska Press.
  3. "Games of the XIth Olympiad – 1936". USAbasketball.com. NBA Media Ventures, LLC. Archived from the original on January 21, 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  4. "Games of the XIVth Olympiad – 1948". USAbasketball.com. NBA Media Ventures, LLC. Archived from the original on August 6, 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  5. "Games of the XVth Olympiad – 1952". USAbasketball.com. NBA Media Ventures, LLC. Archived from the original on August 6, 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  6. "Games of the XVIth Olympiad – 1956". USAbasketball.com. NBA Media Ventures, LLC. Archived from the original on April 18, 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  7. "Games of the XVIIth Olympiad – 1960". USAbasketball.com. NBA Media Ventures, LLC. Archived from the original on 2011-08-17. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  8. "Games of the XVIIIth Olympiad – 1964". USAbasketball.com. NBA Media Ventures, LLC. Archived from the original on August 6, 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  9. "Games of the XIXth Olympiad – 1968". USAbasketball.com. NBA Media Ventures, LLC. Archived from the original on 2011-06-08. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  10. "Roger Brown". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on March 13, 2014. Retrieved March 20, 2014.
  11. "Robert F. Gruenig". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. hoophall.com. 2009. Archived from the original on June 22, 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  12. "Richie Guerin". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on 2014-03-13. Retrieved March 20, 2014.
  13. "Charles D. "Chuck" Hyatt". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. hoophall.com. 2009. Archived from the original on February 14, 2012. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  14. "K. C. Jones". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. hoophall.com. 2014. Archived from the original on June 24, 2016. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  15. "Robert A. "Bob" Kurland". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. hoophall.com. 2009. Archived from the original on June 22, 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  16. "Angelo "Hank" Luisetti". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. hoophall.com. 2009. Archived from the original on June 22, 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  17. "Jack D. McCracken". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. hoophall.com. 2009. Archived from the original on June 22, 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  18. "Andy Phillip". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. hoophall.com. 2009. Archived from the original on 4 June 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  19. "James C. "Jim" Pollard". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. hoophall.com. 2009. Archived from the original on June 28, 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  20. "George H. Yardley". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. hoophall.com. 2009. Archived from the original on 4 June 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  21. "Donald Barksdale". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 20, 2014.[ permanent dead link ]
  22. "Larry Brown". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. hoophall.com. 2009. Archived from the original on 3 June 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2011.