A Lưới District

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A Lưới District

Huyện A Lưới
Country Flag of Vietnam.svg  Vietnam
Region North Central Coastal
Province Thừa Thiên-Huế
CapitalA Lưới
Area
  Total475 sq mi (1,229 km2)
Population
 (2003)
  Total38,616
  Density81/sq mi (31/km2)
Time zone UTC+7 (UTC + 7)

A Lưới is a rural district of Thừa Thiên-Huế Province in the North Central Coast region of Vietnam. It is located west in the highly mountainous area of A Shau Valley bordering Laos. The population includes many Bru, Hoa and Tà Ôi people. As of 2003 the district had a population of 38,616. [1] The district covers an area of 1,229 km² and its capital lies at A Lưới, a former French airfield, later used by the Americans in Operation Delaware and then by the North Vietnamese for courier flights. [2]

Vietnam Country in Southeast Asia

Vietnam, officially the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, is the easternmost country on the Indochina Peninsula. With an estimated 94.6 million inhabitants as of 2016, it is the 15th most populous country in the world. Vietnam shares its land borders with China to the north, and Laos and Cambodia to the west. It shares its maritime borders with Thailand through the Gulf of Thailand, and the Philippines, Indonesia and Malaysia through the South China Sea. Its capital city is Hanoi, while its most populous city is Ho Chi Minh City.

Bru people ethnic group

The Bru are an ethnic group living in Thailand, Laos, India and Vietnam. They are closely linked linguistically and culturally to the Mountain Khmer but are heavily influenced by Laos.

Hoa people ethnic group

The Hoa are a minority group living in Vietnam consisting of persons considered ethnic and racially overseas Han Chinese. They are often referred to as Chinese Vietnamese, Vietnamese Chinese, Sino-Vietnamese, or ethnic Chinese in/from Vietnam by the general Vietnamese populace, Overseas Vietnamese and other ethnic Chinese. The Hoa constitute one group of the Chinese diaspora and contain one of the largest Overseas Chinese communities in Southeast Asia.

Contents

Many areas and mountains in the A Luoi region became historically significant in the mid-late 1960s during the Vietnam War, such the Battle of A Shau, the 5th Special Forces' A Lưới Camp that was overrun in 1966, as well as the 4,878-foot Dong Re Lao Mountain best known as the "Signal Hill" that was seized by 1st Cavalry Division LRRP / Rangers in 1968 during Operation Delaware. [3] Also, A Bia Mountain, known as the Hamburger Hill that was seized by members of the 101st Airborne Division. [4]

Vietnam War 1955–1975 conflict in Vietnam

The Vietnam War, also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America or simply the American War, was a conflict in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. It was the second of the Indochina Wars and was officially fought between North Vietnam and South Vietnam. North Vietnam was supported by the Soviet Union, China, and other communist allies; South Vietnam was supported by the United States, South Korea, the Philippines, Australia, Thailand and other anti-communist allies. The war, considered a Cold War-era proxy war by some, lasted 19 years, with direct U.S. involvement ending in 1973, and included the Laotian Civil War and the Cambodian Civil War, resulting in all three countries becoming communist in 1975.

A Lưới Camp is a former U.S. Army and Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) base in the A Sầu Valley southwest of Huế in the Central Highlands of Vietnam.

Dong Re Lao Mountain

Dong Re Lao Mountain is located at 16.3038°N 107.2479°E in the A Shau Valley, Vietnam, near the Laotian border. It is densely forested and rises to 4,879 feet (1,487 m), just north of A Luoi, a former French airfield.

A Lưới is connected to the former French colonial capital and coastal city, Huế, one of the main historical cities in central Vietnam by National Road 49, a road notorious for poor safety because of the mountainous terrain and poor road surface. The A Lưới District has one town and 21 communes. The central town has gas stations, and a few guest-houses for travelers.

Huế City in Thua Thien-Hue, Vietnam

Huế (Vietnamese: [hwě] is a city in central Vietnam that was the capital of Đàng Trong Kingdom from 1738 to 1775 and of the Nguyen Dynasty from 1802 to 1945. A major attraction is its vast, 19th-century citadel, surrounded by a moat and thick stone walls. It encompasses the Imperial City, with palaces and shrines; the Forbidden Purple City, once the emperor's home; and a replica of the Royal Theater. The city was also the battleground for the Battle of Hue, which was one of the longest and bloodiest battles of the Vietnam War.

Communes

Get to A Luoi

There are many ways to get to A Luoi such as local bus at South Bus Station but it's a really local bus and not good one. Beside you can also rent a private car to explore A Luoi for one or two days. You can connect to Hue city or Hoian Town as well. It could be the best chance to take photos of the minority people on a Vietnam Photo tour.

See also

Operation Delaware

Operation Delaware/Operation Lam Son 216 was a joint military operation launched during the Vietnam War. It began on 19 April 1968, with troops from the United States and the Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) moving into the A Sầu Valley. The A Sầu Valley was a vital corridor for moving military supplies coming from the Ho Chi Minh Trail and was used by the People's Army of Vietnam (PAVN) as a staging area for numerous attacks in northern I Corps. Other than small, special operations reconnaissance patrols, American and South Vietnamese forces had not been present in the region since the Battle of A Shau in March 1966, when a U.S. Special Forces camp located there was overrun.

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Thừa Thiên-Huế Province Province in North Central Coast, Vietnam

Thừa Thiên-Huế is a province in the North Central Coast region of Vietnam, approximately in the centre of the country. It borders Quảng Trị Province to the north and Đà Nẵng to the south, Laos to the west and the East Sea to the east. The province has 128 km of coastline, 22,000 ha of lagoons and over 200,000 ha of forest. There is an extensive complex of imperial tombs and temples in Huế.

A Sầu Valley

The A Shau Valley is a valley in Vietnam's Thừa Thiên-Huế Province, west of the coastal city of Huế, along the border of Laos. The valley runs north and south for 40 kilometers and is a 1.5- kilometer-wide flat bottomland covered with tall elephant grass, flanked by two densely forested mountain ridges whose summits vary in elevation from 900 to 1,800 meters. A Shau Valley was one of the key entry points into South Vietnam for men and material brought along the Ho Chi Minh trail by the North Vietnamese Army and was the scene of heavy fighting during the Vietnam War. The A Shau Valley is bisected lengthwise by Route 548. The Ho Chi Minh Highway now runs along the valley floor.

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  1. Đồng Phúc
  2. Đồng Việt
  3. Tư Mại
  4. Đức Giang
  5. Tiến Dũng
  6. Cảnh Thụy
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  12. Tân Liễu
  13. Tiền Phong
  14. Yên Lư
  15. Hương Gián
  16. Quỳnh Sơn
  17. Nội Hoàng
  18. Nham Sơn
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References

  1. "Districts of Vietnam". Statoids. Archived from the original on 31 March 2009. Retrieved 20 March 2009.
  2. name="Statoids"
  3. Robert C.Ankony, Lurps: A Ranger's Diary of Tet, Khe Sanh, A Shau, and Quang Tri, revised ed., Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, Landham, MD, (2009).
  4. Robert C. Ankony, "No Peace in the Valley," Vietnam magazine, Oct. 2008, 26-31.

Coordinates: 16°10′01″N107°19′59″E / 16.167°N 107.333°E / 16.167; 107.333

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.