Aaron Kitchell

Last updated
Aaron Kitchell
United States Senator
from New Jersey
In office
March 4, 1805 March 12, 1809
Preceded by Jonathan Dayton
Succeeded by John Condit
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's 2nd district
In office
March 4, 1799 March 3, 1801
Preceded byN/A
Succeeded byN/A
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's At-large district
In office
January 29, 1795 March 3, 1797
Preceded by Abraham Clark
Succeeded by James Henderson Imlay
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's At-large district
In office
March 4, 1791 March 3, 1793
Preceded by Lambert Cadwalader
Succeeded by Lambert Cadwalader
Member of the New Jersey General Assembly
In office
17861790
17931794
1797
18011804
1809
Personal details
Born(1744-07-10)July 10, 1744
Hanover, New Jersey
DiedJune 25, 1820(1820-06-25) (aged 75)
Hanover, New Jersey
Political party Democratic-Republican

Aaron Kitchell (July 10, 1744 June 25, 1820) was a blacksmith and politician from Hanover Township, New Jersey, USA. He represented New Jersey in both the United States House of Representatives and the Senate.

Born in Hanover, he attended the common schools and became a blacksmith. He was a member of the New Jersey General Assembly in 17811782, 1784, 17861790, 17931794, 1797, 18011804, and 1809. and was elected to the Second Congress (March 4, 1791 March 3, 1793). He was elected to the Third Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Abraham Clark and was reelected to the Fourth Congress, serving from January 29, 1795, to March 3, 1797. He resumed his former business activities, and was elected to the Sixth Congress (March 4, 1799 March 3, 1801). He was then elected as a Democratic Republican to the U.S. Senate and served from March 4, 1805, to March 12, 1809, when he resigned

Kitchell died in Hanover on June 25, 1820, and was interred there in the churchyard of the Presbyterian Church.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Abraham Clark
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's at-large congressional district

1795–1797
Succeeded by
James H. Imlay
Preceded by
N/A
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's 2nd congressional district

1799–1801
Succeeded by
N/A
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
Jonathan Dayton
U.S. Senator (Class 2) from New Jersey
March 4, 1805 March 12, 1809
Served alongside: John Condit, John Lambert
Succeeded by
John Condit



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