Abiathar Peak

Last updated
Abiathar Peak

AbiatharPeak2010YNP.jpg

January 2010
Highest point
Elevation 10,928 ft (3,331 m) [1]
Prominence 848 ft (258 m) [2]
Coordinates 44°58′31″N110°01′56″W / 44.97528°N 110.03222°W / 44.97528; -110.03222 Coordinates: 44°58′31″N110°01′56″W / 44.97528°N 110.03222°W / 44.97528; -110.03222 [1]
Naming
Pronunciation /əˈbəθər/
Geography
USA Wyoming location map.svg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Abiathar Peak
Wyoming
Location Yellowstone National Park,
Park County, Wyoming, US
Parent range Absaroka Range
Topo map Abiathar Peak

Abiathar Peak el. 10,928 feet (3,331 m) is a mountain peak in the northeastern section of Yellowstone National Park of Absaroka Range. The peak was named by members of the 1885 Hague Geological Survey to honor Charles Abiathar White, a geologist and paleontologist who had participated in early western geological surveys. White never visited Yellowstone. [3]

Yellowstone National Park first national park in the world, located in the US states Wyoming, Montana and Idaho

Yellowstone National Park is an American national park located in Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho. It was established by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant on March 1, 1872. Yellowstone was the first national park in the U.S. and is also widely held to be the first national park in the world. The park is known for its wildlife and its many geothermal features, especially Old Faithful geyser, one of its most popular features. It has many types of ecosystems, but the subalpine forest is the most abundant. It is part of the South Central Rockies forests ecoregion.

Absaroka Range mountain range

The Absaroka Range is a sub-range of the Rocky Mountains in the United States. The range stretches about 150 mi (240 km) across the Montana-Wyoming border, and 75 miles at its widest, forming the eastern boundary of Yellowstone National Park along Paradise Valley (Montana), and the western side of the Bighorn Basin. The range borders the Beartooth Mountains to the north and the Wind River Range to the south. The northern edge of the range rests along I-90 and Livingston, Montana. The highest peak in the range is Francs Peak, located in Wyoming at 13,153 ft (4,009 m). There are 46 other peaks over 12,000 ft (3,700 m).

Charles Abiathar White American paleontologist

Charles Abiathar White was an American geologist, paleontologist, and writer whose publications total 238 titles. He was born at North Dighton, Massachusetts. He was the State geologist of Iowa in 1866-70, and professor of natural history in the State University of Iowa in 1867-73. He held a similar position at Bowdoin College in 1873-75, and was geologist and paleontologist of the United States Geological Survey between 1874 and 1892, and after 1895 was an associate in paleontology at the United States National Museum.

Images of Abiathar Peak
Abiathar Peak's namesake, Charles Abiathar White CharlesAbiatharWhiteca1848.jpg
Abiathar Peak's namesake, Charles Abiathar White
Abiathar Peak's namesake, Charles Abiathar White  
Abiathar Peak center between Soda Butte and Amphitheather Mountain SodaButteAbiatharPeakAmphitheatherMtnYNP.jpg
Abiathar Peak center between Soda Butte and Amphitheather Mountain
Abiathar Peak center between Soda Butte and Amphitheather Mountain 
1977 AbiatharPeakYNP.jpg
1977
1977 

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 "Abiathar Peak". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2010-01-31.
  2. "Abiathar Peak". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2010-01-31.
  3. Whittlesey, Lee (1988). Yellowstone Place Names. Helena, MT: Montana Historical Society Press. p. 13. ISBN   0-917298-15-2.

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