Abrigael Bohórquez

Last updated

Abrigael Bohórquez was a poet and playwright born in Caborca, Sonora, Mexico in 1936, many of which are social criticisms. He was also one of the first writers to deal with the theme of homosexuality in Mexican poetry. His first book was Ensayos Poéticos in 1955, when he was just nineteen years old with no formal training. He studied the dramatic arts at the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes (INBA) and the Instituto Cinematográfico de la Asociación Nacional de Actores. Shortly after, his work began to gain recognitions such as the Primer Concurso Latinoamericano XEW for his poetry and various from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. He became a professor at the Academia de Arte Dramático of the Universidad de Sonora and director for two theatre groups. Bohórquez died in Hermosillo in 1995 after writing eighteen works of poetry and plays. Some of these include Poesía i teatro, La hoguera en el pañuelo, Canción de amor y muerte por Rubén Jaramillo, and Las amarras terrestres. [1]

Caborca is the municipal seat of Caborca Municipality in Sonora. The municipal population was 85,631 (2015). The official name of the municipal seat is Heroica Caborca.

Sonora State of Mexico

Sonora, officially Estado Libre y Soberano de Sonora, is one of 31 states that, with Mexico City, comprise the 32 federal entities of United Mexican States. It is divided into 72 municipalities; the capital city is Hermosillo. Sonora is bordered by the states of Chihuahua to the east, Baja California to the northwest and Sinaloa to the south. To the north, it shares the U.S.–Mexico border with the states of Arizona and New Mexico, and on the west has a significant share of the coastline of the Gulf of California.

Mexico country in the southern portion of North America

Mexico, officially the United Mexican States, is a country in the southern portion of North America. It is bordered to the north by the United States; to the south and west by the Pacific Ocean; to the southeast by Guatemala, Belize, and the Caribbean Sea; and to the east by the Gulf of Mexico. Covering almost 2,000,000 square kilometres (770,000 sq mi), the nation is the fifth largest country in the Americas by total area and the 13th largest independent state in the world. With an estimated population of over 120 million people, the country is the eleventh most populous state and the most populous Spanish-speaking state in the world, while being the second most populous nation in Latin America after Brazil. Mexico is a federation comprising 31 states and Mexico City, a special federal entity that is also the capital city and its most populous city. Other metropolises in the state include Guadalajara, Monterrey, Puebla, Toluca, Tijuana and León.

Related Research Articles

Hermosillo City in Sonora, Mexico

Hermosillo, formerly called Pitic, is a city located centrally in the northwestern Mexican state of Sonora. It is the capital and largest city as well as the main economic center for the state and region. As of 2015, the city has a population of 812,229 inhabitants, making it the 16th largest city in Mexico. The recent city population spur is due to its recent strong industrialization, especially in the automotive industry.

Navojoa City in Sonora, Mexico

Navojoa is the fifth-largest city in the northern Mexican state of Sonora and is situated in the southern part of the state. The city is the administrative seat of Navojoa Municipality, located in the Mayo River Valley.

Ciudad Obregón City in Sonora, Mexico

Ciudad Obregón is the second largest city in the northern Mexican state of Sonora and named for Sonoran revolutionary general and president of Mexico, Álvaro Obregón. It is situated 525 km (326 mi) south of the state's northern border with the U.S. state of Arizona. It is also the municipal seat of Cajeme municipality, located in the Yaqui Valley.

Rubén Aguilar journalist

Son of Ruben Aguilar Monteverde (1924-2011) and Rosa Alicia García Valenzuela (1923-2016). His father was Headmaster of the Banco Nacional de México (Banamex), institution in which he worked for 43 years. He took part in the creation of a dozen civil society organizations, including Centro Mexicano para la Filantropía (CEMEFI), FUNSALUD and Managing Director of the Instituto Nacional de Nutrición Dr. Salvador Zubirán. He advised companies such as Grupo Carso, Grupo Alfa and Cinépolis.

Mayo is an Uto-Aztecan language. It is spoken by about 40,000 people, the Mexican Mayo or Yoreme Indians, who live in the South of the Mexican state of Sonora and in the North of the neighboring state of Sinaloa. Under the General Law of Linguistic Rights of the Indigenous Peoples"Law of Linguistic Rights, it is recognized as a "national language" along with 62 other indigenous languages and Spanish which all have the same validity in Mexico. The language is considered 'critically endangered' by UNESCO.

Arturo ('Jack') Warman Gryj was a Mexican anthropologist, member of the cabinets of Carlos Salinas and Ernesto Zedillo, also an author of nine books, two of which have been translated to English. He also wrote multiple articles for the magazine Nexos. He has also taught social epistemology at the Universidad de Chile

Juan Soriano Mexican artist

Juan Soriano was a Mexican artist known for his paintings, sculptures and theater work. He was a child prodigy whose career began early as did his fame with various writers authoring works about him. He exhibited in the United States and Europe as well as major venues in Mexico such as the Museo de Arte Moderno and the Palacio de Bellas Artes. His monumental sculptures can be found in various parts of Mexico and in Europe as well. Recognitions of his work include Mexico’s National Art Prize, the Chevalier des Arts et Lettres and membership in France’s Legion of Honour.

Ópata is either of two closely related Uto-Aztecan languages, Teguima and Eudeve, spoken by the Opata people of northern central Sonora in Mexico. It was believed to be dead already in 1930, and Carl Sofus Lumholtz reported the Opata to have become "Mexicanized" and lost their language and customs already when traveling through Sonora in the 1890s. In a 1993 survey by the Instituto Nacional Indigenista fifteen people in the Mexican Federal District self-identified as speakers of Ópata. This may not mean however that the language was actually living, since linguistic nomenclature in Mexico is notoriously fuzzy. Sometimes Eudeve is called Opata, a term which should be restricted to Teguima. Eudeve and Teguima are distinct languages, but sometimes have been considered merely dialects of one single language. The INALI does not count Opata among the currently extant indigenous languages of Mexico.

Domingo Elizondo was a Spanish soldier from Navarre who lived in the late 18th century.

Ricardo Pozas Arciniega was a distinguished Mexican anthropologist, scientific investigator and indigenista. He wrote the classic anthropological works Juan Pérez Jolote, biografía de un tzotzil and Los mazatecos y Chamula, un pueblo indio de los altos de Chiapas.

Juan José Díaz Infante Núñez was a Mexican architect and industrial designer.

Gilberto Aceves Navarro Mexican artist

Gilberto Aceves Navarro, is a Mexican painter and sculptor and a professor at the Escuela Nacional de Artes Plásticas and Academy of San Carlos. He has had over 200 individual exhibits of his work with his murals found in Mexico, Japan and the United States. He has received numerous awards for his work including grants as a Creador Artístico of the Sistema Nacional de Creadores de Arte, Premio Nacional de Ciencias y Artes and Bellas Artes Medal from the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes.

Melchor Peredo Mexican artist

Melchor Peredo is a Mexican muralist and a representative of the social realist school of mural painting in Mexico. His murals depict historical scenes from Mexican history with an emphasis on revolutionary subjects. His work is featured in public and government buildings across Mexico. He has also painted murals in the USA and Europe. He lives in Xalapa, Veracruz.

Gerardo Cornejo Murrieta (1937–2014) was a writer born in a community called Tarachi in the municipality of Arivechi, Sonora, Mexico in 1937. His works reflect his love for his home state, calling himself a "tarachilango", although his career obliged him to live for a long time in Mexico City.

Sylvia Aguilar Zéleny is a novelist and short story writer born in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico, in 1973. She studied Hispanic literature at the Universidad de Sonora and began her career as a teacher,at the Instituto Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey She has an MFAin creative writing from the University of Texas at El Paso. She learned to write through workshops given by other authors such as Abrigael Bohórquez, Héctor Manjarrez, David Martín del Cammpo and Cristina Rivera-Garza. Her works have appeared in Altanoche, La Tempestad, Las Hojas de la Mancuspia, Milenio, Néctar y Picnic and a large number of magazines. Her work has won Concurso de Libro Sonorense in 2003, the Concurso de Cuento Cristina Rivera-Garza in 2005, and an honorable mention in the Concurso de Libro Sonorense in 2000.

Mario Moreno Zazueta is a painter, etcher and art professor born in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico in 1942. He received his artistic training at the Academia Artes Plásticas of the Universidad de Sonora and at the Escuela Nacional de Pintura y Escultura La Esmeralda in Mexico City. After this, he also went to San Francisco, California to study as well. Moreno notes that his main artistic influence has been Héctor Martínez Arteche. Moreno’s work has been displayed in numerous shows and galleries in various parts of the world, where is work is known for its abstract experimentation with color, light and shadow. His best-known works include Premonición del atardecer, Llovió en alguna parte, El agua del norte nunca llega, Premonición del invierno and Las horas quietas. Today, he is a professor at the Universidad de Sonora.

Gustavo Arias Murueta is a Mexican painter, sculptor and poet, a member of the Salón de la Plástica Mexicana best known for his work in drawing, graphic arts and oil painting. He originally studied architecture at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México where he met artists such as Rufino Tamayo, David Alfaro Siqueiros and José Clemente Orozco. In the 1950s, he began to produce artworks, with his first exhibition in 1961. From then until the present he has had a career as an artist with individual and collective exhibitions in both Mexico and abroad. While his work has been heavily influenced by Orozco, he is considered part of the Generación de la Ruptura movement.

Vicente Gandía was a Mexican artist of Spanish origin who is best known for his depictions of nature and buildings. He originally trained to be an architect but abandoned this in favor of art, but with his art career beginning by drawing interiors. His major break came in 1968, with international expose which led to greater demand for his work. Recognitions for his art include membership in the Salón de la Plástica Mexicana, two awards from the same institution, a homage to the artist sponsored by the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia while still alive and two others after his death, one with the Festival Internacional Cervantino.

Pedro Pablo Preux was a Mexican tapestry maker of French origin, part of an effort to revive the craft as an art form in Europe under Jean Luçart then introducing and promoting the concept in Mexico in the 1960s and 1970s. Although tapestry making as art declined back to handcraft status starting in the 1980s, Preux’s efforts were recognized with membership in the Salón de la Plástica Mexicana and the Sistema Nacional de Creadores de Arte.

References

  1. Jimenez Gonzalez, Victor Manuel, ed. (2010). Sonora: Guía para descubrir los encantos del estado[Sonora: Guide to discover the charms of the state] (in Spanish). Mexico City: Editorial Océano de Mexico SA de CV. pp. 13–14. ISBN   978-607-400-319-2.