Ace Parker

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References

  1. Bowling, Lewis (November 2013). "The Ace of them all: Duke legend Ace Parker passes away at age 101; was the oldest living Pro Football Hall of Famer". GoDuke the Magazine. Winston-Salem, North Carolina: Blue Devil IMG Sports Network. 5 (3): 14–16.
  2. 1 2 "Ace Parker Celebrates 100th Birthday Today – Duke University Blue Devils | Official Athletics Site". GoDuke.com. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  3. "Pinch Hitting Records". baseball-almanac.com. Retrieved April 4, 2012.
  4. "May 7, 1937 Philadelphia Athletics at St. Louis Browns Box Score and Play by Play". Baseball-Reference.com. May 7, 1937. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  5. "April 26, 1938 New York Yankees at Philadelphia Athletics Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. April 26, 1938. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  6. "Ace Parker dead at 101 - Pro Football Hall of Fame Official Site". www.profootballhof.com. Retrieved November 9, 2018.
Ace Parker
Ace Parker.png
Parker pictured in the Chanticleer 1936, Duke yearbook
Born(1912-05-17)May 17, 1912
DiedNovember 6, 2013(2013-11-06) (aged 101)
Portsmouth, Virginia

Football career
No. 7, 31, 88
Position: Quarterback,
Halfback
Personal information
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:178 lb (81 kg)
Career information
College: Duke (1934–1936)
NFL Draft: 1937  / Round: 2 / Pick: 13
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Passing yards:4,698
Passing touchdowns:30
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

Baseball career
Shortstop
Batted: Right
Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 24, 1937, for the Philadelphia Athletics
Last MLB appearance
September 4, 1938, for the Philadelphia Athletics