Achaicus of Corinth

Last updated
Saint

Achaicus of Corinth
Born Greek: Achaikos
Hometown Corinth, Peloponnese, Greece
Venerated in Eastern Orthodox Church, Roman Catholic Church
Feast June 15

Achaicus (Achaikos, "belonging to Achaia") [1] was a Corinthian Christian who according to the Bible, together with Fortunatus and Stephanas, carried a letter from the Corinthians to St. Paul, and from St. Paul to the Corinthians (1 Corinthians 16:17; cf. also 16:15). [2] [3]

Life

By Eastern Orthodox Church tradition, Achaicus is also often numbered as one of the Seventy disciples, a group of early followers sent out by Jesus in Luke's gospel. The Biblical account does not mention the names of the seventy disciples, but various lists including Achaicus have been compiled since the 7th century, [4] such as in the Orthodox Study Bible . [5] It's not known whether the three Corinthians walked to Ephesus, a distance of about 900 miles, or crossed the Aegean Sea by ship in two weeks or more. We don't know whether the trip to Ephesus "was a specially commissioned assignment or a regular part of other responsibilities that brought them to the area anyway". But we know for sure they reliably carried two letters and linked a pastor to his people. [6]

Veneration

Achaicus is venerated as saint by Eastern Orthodox Church, Roman Catholic Church and other Christian Churches. In the Orthodox Church, he is commemorated with a feast day on June 15, with his companion Fortunatas. [5] He is also remembered on the Synaxis of the Seventy Apostles on January 4. [7]

Related Research Articles

Saint Titus Greek saint

Titus was an early Christian missionary and church leader, a companion and disciple of Paul the Apostle, mentioned in several of the Pauline epistles including the Epistle to Titus. He is believed to be a Gentile converted to Christianity by Paul and, according to tradition, he was consecrated as Bishop of the Island of Crete.

Apollos

Apollos was a 1st-century Alexandrian Jewish Christian mentioned several times in the New Testament. A contemporary and colleague of Paul the Apostle, he played an important role in the early development of the churches of Ephesus and Corinth.

Barnabas one of the earliest Christian disciples

Barnabas, born Joseph, was according to tradition an early Christian, one of the prominent Christian disciples in Jerusalem. According to Acts 4:36, Barnabas was a Cypriot Jew. Named an apostle in Acts 14:14, he and Paul the Apostle undertook missionary journeys together and defended Gentile converts against the Judaizers. They traveled together making more converts, and participated in the Council of Jerusalem. Barnabas and Paul successfully evangelized among the "God-fearing" Gentiles who attended synagogues in various Hellenized cities of Anatolia.

First Epistle to the Corinthians Book of the Bible (Letter)

The First Epistle to the Corinthians, usually referred to as First Corinthians or 1 Corinthians is a Pauline epistle of the New Testament of the Christian Bible. The epistle is attributed to Paul the Apostle and a co-author named Sosthenes, and is addressed to the Christian church in Corinth. Scholars believe that Sosthenes was the amanuensis who wrote down the text of the letter at Paul's direction. It addresses various issues that had arisen in the Christian community at Corinth.

Luke the Evangelist One of the four traditionally ascribed authors of the canonical Gospels

Luke the Evangelist is one of the Four Evangelists—the four traditionally ascribed authors of the canonical Gospels. The Early Church Fathers ascribed to him authorship of both the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, which would mean Luke contributed over a quarter of the text of the New Testament, more than any other author. Prominent figures in early Christianity such as Jerome and Eusebius later reaffirmed his authorship, although a lack of conclusive evidence as to the identity of the author of the works has led to discussion in scholarly circles, both secular and religious.

Saint Timothy Early Christian evangelist and bishop from Roman Anatolia

Timothy was an early Christian evangelist and the first Christian bishop of Ephesus, who tradition relates died around the year AD 97.

John the Apostle apostle of Jesus; son of Zebedee and Salome, brother of James,; traditionally identified with John the Evangelist, John of Patmos, and the Beloved Disciple

John the Apostle was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus according to the New Testament. Generally listed as the youngest apostle, he was the son of Zebedee and Salome or Joanna. His brother was James, who was another of the Twelve Apostles. The Church Fathers identify him as John the Evangelist, John of Patmos, John the Elder and the Beloved Disciple, and testify that he outlived the remaining apostles and that he was the only one to die of natural causes. The traditions of most Christian denominations have held that John the Apostle is the author of several books of the New Testament, although this has been disputed by scholars.

Agabus prophet

Agabus was an early follower of Christianity mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles as a prophet. He is traditionally remembered as one of the Seventy Disciples described in Luke 10:1-24.

Silas Ancient Roman saint and bishop

Silas or Silvanus was a leading member of the Early Christian community, who accompanied Paul the Apostle on parts of his first and second missionary journeys.

James, brother of Jesus Important figure in Early Christianity

James the Just, or a variation of James, brother of the Lord, was the brother of Jesus, according to the New Testament. He was an early leader of the Jerusalem Church of the Apostolic Age, to which Paul was also affiliated. He died in martyrdom in 62 or 69 AD.

Seventy disciples early students of Jesus mentioned in the Gospel of Luke

The seventy disciples or seventy-two disciples were early emissaries of Jesus mentioned in the Gospel of Luke. According to Luke, the only gospel in which they appear, Jesus appointed them and sent them out in pairs on a specific mission which is detailed in the text.

Onesiphorus was a Christian referred to in the New Testament letter of Second Timothy. According to the letter, supposedly sent by St. Paul, Onesiphorus sought out Paul who was imprisoned at the time in Rome.

Aristarchus of Thessalonica Ancient Roman saint

Aristarchus or Aristarch, "a Greek Macedonian of Thessalonica", was an early Christian mentioned in a few passages of the New Testament. He accompanied Saint Paul on his journey to Rome. Along with Gaius, another Macedonian, Aristarchus was seized by the mob at Ephesus and taken into the theater. Later, Aristarchus returned with Paul from Greece to Asia. At Caesarea, he embarked with Paul on a ship of Edremit (Adramyttium) bound for Myra in Lycia ; whether he traveled with him from there to Rome is not recorded. Aristarchus is described as Paul's "fellow prisoner" and "fellow laborer" in Colossians 4:10 and Philemon 1:24, respectively.

Fortunatus is person mentioned by St Paul in I Corinthians 16:17: I was glad when Stephanas, Fortunatus, and Achaicus arrived, because they have supplied what was lacking from you.

Outline of Christianity Overview of and topical guide to Christianity

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Christianity:

Development of the New Testament canon Development of the New Testament canon

The canon of the New Testament is the set of books Christians regard as divinely inspired and constituting the New Testament of the Christian Bible. For most, it is an agreed-upon list of twenty-seven books that includes the Canonical Gospels, Acts, letters of the Apostles, and Revelation. The books of the canon of the New Testament were written before 120 AD.

Apostles The primary disciples of Jesus

In Christian theology and ecclesiology, apostles, particularly the Twelve Apostles, were the primary disciples of Jesus according to the New Testament and the Qur’an. During the life and ministry of Jesus in the 1st century AD, the apostles were his closest followers and became the primary teachers of the gospel message of Jesus.

Stephanas was a member of the church at Corinth, whose family were among the limited number of believers who the Paul the apostle had baptized there and who Paul refers to as the “first-fruits of Achaia”.

1 Corinthians 1

1 Corinthians 1 is the first chapter of the First Epistle to the Corinthians in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. It is authored by Paul the Apostle and Sosthenes in Ephesus, composed between 52–55 CE, and sent to the church in Corinth.

1 Corinthians 16

1 Corinthians 16 is the sixteenth chapter of the First Epistle to the Corinthians in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. It is authored by Paul the Apostle and Sosthenes in Ephesus, composed between 52–55 CE, and sent to the church in Corinth. This chapter contains the closing statements of the letter, with Paul's travel plans, final instructions, and greetings. Verse 8 confirms that Paul was in Ephesus when the letter was composed, and verse 21 confirms that the majority of the letter was scribed by an amanuensis.

References

  1. Achaicus Archived 2013-04-21 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved on 29 Mar 2018
  2. Wikisource-logo.svg Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Achaicus"  . Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  3. Orchard, Bernard (1982). A Synopsis of the Four Gospels, in a New Translation. Mercer University Press. p. 49.
  4. Metzger, Bruce (1980). New Testament Studies: Philological, Versional, and Patristic. BRILL. p. 31. ISBN   978-90-04-06163-7.
  5. 1 2 The Orthodox Study Bible. Thomas Nelson. 2008. p. 1822. ISBN   978-1-4185-7636-3.
  6. The ripple effect: Stephanas, Fortunatus, and Achaicus Retrieved on 29 Mar 2018
  7. "Synaxis of the Seventy Apostles". Orthodox Church in America. Retrieved 19 August 2013.