Achillius of Larissa

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Saint Achillius
Hosios Loukas (diakonikon, arch) - Achillios.jpg
Mosaic in Hosios Loukas
Bishop of Larissa
Bornunknown
DiedAD 330
Larissa, Thessaly
Venerated in Orthodox Church
Roman Catholic Church
Major shrine the island of St. Achillius in Small Prespa Lake, Greece
Feast 15 May
Patronage Larissa

Saint Achillius of Larissa, also known as Achilles, [1] Ailus, [2] Achillas, [1] or Achilius [3] (Greek : Άγιος Αχίλλειος) (died 330 AD), was one of the 318 persons present at the First Council of Nicaea. His feast day is on 15 May. [4]

Greek language language spoken in Greece, Cyprus and Southern Albania

Greek is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece, Cyprus and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea. It has the longest documented history of any living Indo-European language, spanning more than 3000 years of written records. Its writing system has been the Greek alphabet for the major part of its history; other systems, such as Linear B and the Cypriot syllabary, were used previously. The alphabet arose from the Phoenician script and was in turn the basis of the Latin, Cyrillic, Armenian, Coptic, Gothic, and many other writing systems.

First Council of Nicaea council of Christian bishops convened in Nicaea in 325

The First Council of Nicaea was a council of Christian bishops convened in the Bithynian city of Nicaea by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in AD 325.

Contents

Life

Achillius was metropolitan of Larissa in Thessaly, Greece. Achillius is mainly remembered for his vehement defense of orthodoxy during the Council of Nicea and a miracle he performed in testimony against Arianism.

Metropolitan bishop ecclesiastical office

In Christian churches with episcopal polity, the rank of metropolitan bishop, or simply metropolitan, pertains to the diocesan bishop or archbishop of a metropolis.

Larissa Place in Greece

Larissa is the capital and largest city of the Thessaly region, the fourth-most populous in Greece according to the population results of municipal units of 2011 census and capital of the Larissa regional unit. It is a principal agricultural centre and a national transport hub, linked by road and rail with the port of Volos, the cities of Thessaloniki and Athens. Larissa, within its municipality, has 162,591 inhabitants, while the regional unit of Larissa reached a population of 284,325. The urban area of the city, although mostly contained within the Larissa municipality, also includes the communities of Giannouli, Platykampos, Nikaia, Terpsithea and several other suburban settlements, bringing the wider urban area population of the city to about 174,012 inhabitants and extends over an area of 572.3 km2 (221.0 sq mi).

Thessaly Place in Thessaly and Central Greece, Greece

Thessaly is a traditional geographic and modern administrative region of Greece, comprising most of the ancient region of the same name. Before the Greek Dark Ages, Thessaly was known as Aeolia, and appears thus in Homer's Odyssey.

Taking up a stone, Achillius called to the Arians: 'If Christ is a creature of God, as you say, tell oil to flow from this stone.' The heretics kept silent, amazed at this demand by St. Achillius. Then the saint continued: 'And if the Son of God is equal to the Father, as we believe, then let oil flow from this stone.' And oil flowed out, to the amazement of all. [2]

An oil is any nonpolar chemical substance that is a viscous liquid at ambient temperatures and is both hydrophobic and lipophilic. Oils have a high carbon and hydrogen content and are usually flammable and surface active.

Heresy belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs

Heresy is any belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs, in particular the accepted beliefs of a church or religious organization. A heretic is a proponent of such claims or beliefs. Heresy is distinct from both apostasy, which is the explicit renunciation of one's religion, principles or cause, and blasphemy, which is an impious utterance or action concerning God or sacred things.

Son of God religious title, designating a monarch, messiah, demigod, or deity

Historically, many rulers have assumed titles such as son of God, son of a god or son of heaven.

Upon returning from the Council, Achillius is reputed to have "cast down many pagan temples, built many churches, [and] cast out many demons". [5] The 1910 Catholic Encyclopedia makes issue to reference Achillius in its article about the bishopric of Larissa.

Paganism non-Abrahamic religion, or modern religious movement such as nature worship

Paganism is a term first used in the fourth century by early Christians for people in the Roman Empire who practiced polytheism. This was either because they were increasingly rural and provincial relative to the Christian population, or because they were not milites Christi. Alternate terms in Christian texts for the same group were hellene, gentile, and heathen. Ritual sacrifice was an integral part of ancient Graeco-Roman religion and was regarded as an indication of whether a person was pagan or Christian.

Exorcism practice of evicting demons or other spiritual entities from a person or an area

Exorcism is the religious or spiritual practice of evicting demons or other spiritual entities from a person, or an area, that are believed to be possessed. Depending on the spiritual beliefs of the exorcist, this may be done by causing the entity to swear an oath, performing an elaborate ritual, or simply by commanding it to depart in the name of a higher power. The practice is ancient and part of the belief system of many cultures and religions.

<i>Catholic Encyclopedia</i> English-language encyclopedia

The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church, also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia and the Original Catholic Encyclopedia, is an English-language encyclopedia published in the United States and designed to serve the Roman Catholic Church. The first volume appeared in March 1907 and the last three volumes appeared in 1912, followed by a master index volume in 1914 and later supplementary volumes. It was designed "to give its readers full and authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine".

We must mention especially, St. Achilius, in the fourth century, whose feast is on 15 May, and who is celebrated for his miracles. [3]

Veneration

Achillius died in Larissa in the year 330. When Samuel, Emperor of Bulgaria, conquered Thessaly, he translated the relics of Achillius to Prespa, to an island in a lake that was subsequently named after the saint. [6] A district of Larissa is called Saint Achellios after this saint.

Translation (relic) movement of a holy relic from one location to another

In Christianity, the translation of relics is the removal of holy objects from one locality to another ; usually only the movement of the remains of the saint's body would be treated so formally, with secondary relics such as items of clothing treated with less ceremony. Translations could be accompanied by many acts, including all-night vigils and processions, often involving entire communities.

Prespa was a medieval town, situated in the homonymous area in south-western Macedonia. It was a residence and burial place of the Bulgarian emperor Samuel and according to some sources capital of the First Bulgarian Empire and seat of the Bulgarian Patriarchate in the last decades of the 10th century.

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 Catholic Online. "St. Achillas". Saints & Angels. Archived from the original on 4 February 2007. Retrieved 2007-01-18.
  2. 1 2 Velimirovich, Nikolai. "St Achillius, Bishop of Larissa". The Prologue From Ochrid. Archived from the original on 2007-10-19. Retrieved 2007-01-18.
  3. 1 2 "Larissa". Catholic Encyclopedia. 9. Robert Appleton Company. 1910. Archived from the original on 5 February 2007. Retrieved 2007-01-18.
  4. (in Greek) Ὁ Ἅγιος Ἀχίλλιος Ἐπίσκοπος Λαρίσης. ΜΕΓΑΣ ΣΥΝΑΞΑΡΙΣΤΗΣ.
  5. "God is Wonderful in His Saints". "Our Father among the Saints Achillius, Bishop of Larissa". Orthodox Saints commemorated in May. Archived from the original on 13 February 2007. Retrieved 2007-01-18.
  6. See Macedonia Historical Maps, which cites "St Achillius" as a "small island with Byzantine churches" in Prespa.

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