Action of 14 February 1795

Last updated
Action of 14 February 1795
Part of the French Revolutionary Wars
Date14 February 1795
Location
Result Spanish victory
Belligerents
Flag of France.svg France Flag of Spain (1785-1873, 1875-1931).svg Spain
Commanders and leaders
Mr.Guet   (POW) Juan de Lángara
José Jordán
Strength
1 frigate 1 ship of the line
Casualties and losses
1 frigate captured,
280 killed, wounded or captured [1]
unknown

The Action of 14 February 1795 was a minor naval engagement of the French Revolutionary Wars fought in the Gulf of Roses between a ship of the line of Juan de Lángara’s fleet and a French squadron of a frigate and a corvette. For orders of Lángara, the Spanish Ship of the Line Reina María Luisa of 112 guns, chased the French frigate, named Iphigenie , more than one day, forcing finally her to strike her colors. The corvette, which separated three days before in a storm, was supposed to be lost. [2]

French Revolutionary Wars series of conflicts fought between the French Republic and several European monarchies from 1792 to 1802

The French Revolutionary Wars were a series of sweeping military conflicts lasting from 1792 until 1802 and resulting from the French Revolution. They pitted the French Republic against Great Britain, Austria and several other monarchies. They are divided in two periods: the War of the First Coalition (1792–97) and the War of the Second Coalition (1798–1802). Initially confined to Europe, the fighting gradually assumed a global dimension. After a decade of constant warfare and aggressive diplomacy, France had conquered a wide array of territories, from the Italian Peninsula and the Low Countries in Europe to the Louisiana Territory in North America. French success in these conflicts ensured the spread of revolutionary principles over much of Europe.

Gulf of Roses province

The Gulf of Roses is the most northeastern bay on the Catalan coast of Spain.

Juan de Lángara Admiral of the Spanish Navy

Juan Francisco de Lángara y Huarte was a Spanish naval officer and Minister of Marine.

Several days later, on 30 March, when the Montañés of 74 guns was carrying the prize, she was attacked by a strong French squadron of eight ships of the line and two frigates which initially waved the Spanish flag. [3] Thanks to her superior speed, she was able to reach the port of Sant Feliu de Guíxols, and after a hard fight in which she fired 1,100 cannonballs, [4] the attacking forces were rejected with the only loss aboard the Montañés of three men killed and few wounded. [4] The French withdrew to Menorca.

The Montañés was a 74 gun third-rate Spanish ship of the line. The name ship of her class, she was built in the Ferrol shipyards and paid for by the people of Cantabria. She was built following José Romero y Fernández de Landa's system as part of the San Ildefonso class, though her were amended by Retamosa to refine her buoyancy. She was launched in May 1794 and entered service the following year. With 2400 copper plates on her hull, she was much faster than other ships of the same era, reaching 14 knots downwind and 10 knots upwind.

Sant Feliu de Guíxols Municipality in Catalonia, Spain

Sant Feliu de Guíxols is a municipality in the comarca of the Baix Empordà in Catalonia, Spain. It is situated on the Costa Brava and is an important port and tourist centre. The district abuts to the north, the upmarket s'Agaró resort built round the Sant Pol Beach. In addition to tourism and the port the cork industry is a traditionally local industry. The town contains a large monastery which now houses the town museum and is a protected historico-artistic monument. The C-253 road runs north along the coast to Platja d'Aro and Palamós, while the C-65 road runs inland from the town. The GI-682 provides a dramatic cliff top drive to Tossa de Mar to the south.

Menorca one of the Balearic Islands

Menorca or Minorca is one of the Balearic Islands located in the Mediterranean Sea belonging to Spain. Its name derives from its size, contrasting it with nearby Majorca.

Notes

  1. Marcelino p.203
  2. Debrett p.39
  3. Marcelino p.204
  4. 1 2 Marcelino p.205

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