Addison Richards

Last updated

Addison Richards
Nick Carter, Master Detective 1939.JPG
Richards in the trailer for Nick Carter, Master Detective , 1939
Born
Addison Whitaker Richards, Jr.

(1902-10-20)October 20, 1902
DiedMarch 22, 1964(1964-03-22) (aged 61)
Resting placeOak Park Cemetery in Claremont, California
OccupationFilm and television actor
Years active1933–1964
Spouses
    Vivian Eccles
    (m. 1930;died 1946)
      Patricia Sarazln
      (m. 1952)
Children1

Addison Whittaker Richards, Jr. (October 20, 1902 March 22, 1964) was an American actor of film and television. Richards appeared in more than three hundred films between 1933 and his death.

Contents

Biography

A native of Zanesville, Ohio, Richards was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Addison Richards. His grandfather was a mayor of Zanesville. Following his father's death in 1942, the family moved to California. [1]

Richards was cast in many television series, including the syndicated 1950s crime drama, Sheriff of Cochise , starring John Bromfield. From 1955 to 1961, he appeared in six episodes in different roles on the NBC anthology series, The Loretta Young Show .

In 1956 Richards appeared as Doc Jennings in an uncredited role in the western movie The Fastest Gun Alive starring Glenn Ford . However, he often had more substantial supporting roles in films, especially Westerns, including playing George Armstrong Custer in Badlands of Dakota (1941) and the marshal in The Broken Star (1956).

From 1957-1958, he appeared in the recurring role of J.B. Barker in nine episodes of Jackie Cooper's NBC sitcom, The People's Choice . [2] In 1958, he was cast as Warden Johnson in the episode "Dead Reckoning" on the ABC/Warner Brothers western series, Colt .45 .

In 1957, in the first of three appearances on Dale Robertson's NBC western series, Tales of Wells Fargo , Richards played Governor Lew Wallace in the episode entitled, "Billy the Kid". Richards played the role of Evanson in the 1957 episode "Venus of Park Avenue" on the CBS crime drama, Richard Diamond, Private Detective .

In 1958 and 1959, Richards was cast as Doc Jay Calhoun in seven episodes, one uncredited, of the CBS western series, Trackdown. [3]

In 1959, Richards portrayed Mayor Thurston in the episode "Traildust" of CBS's western series, The Texan , starring Rory Calhoun. He was cast that same year as Martin Kingsley in two episodes of the NBC western series, Cimarron City . He appeared as Doc Gamble in three episodes of the radio series made briefly into a 1959 NBC sitcom, Fibber McGee and Molly . From 1960 to 1961, he appeared as Doc Landy in eight episodes of the NBC western series, the Deputy , with Henry Fonda and Allen Case. [2]

Richards portrayed Mark Stacy in the 1960 episode "Dennis and the Bees" of the CBS sitcom, Dennis the Menace , starring Jay North. He guest starred as Judge Danby in the 1961 episode "The Best Policy" of another NBC western series, The Tall Man . [2] Also, in 1961, in the TV series Rawhide , he played Frank Miller in the episode "Incident of the Running Iron".

Richards was cast in two episodes of the ABC sitcom, The Real McCoys : as R.T. Overland in "Weekend in Los Angeles" (1960) and as Colonel Martin in "You Can't Beat the Army" (1961). In 1961, he appeared in different roles in two episodes of the CBS crime drama, Checkmate . He was cast as an immigration officer in the 1962 episode "Mi's Citizenship" of the NBC family drama, National Velvet . [2]

Richards appeared on the CBS sitcoms, Pete and Gladys and in 1963 as Dean Hollister in The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis , starring Dwayne Hickman. He was cast as Frank Newton on an episode of Petticoat Junction in October 1963. He was cast twice in 1964 on CBS's The Beverly Hillbillies , with Buddy Ebsen. His last television role was as Colonel Saunders in the 1964 episode "The Permanent Recruit" of ABC's No Time for Sergeants , loosely based on the Andy Griffith film of the same name.

Personal life

Richards met Vivian Eccles in late 1929, marrying a year later and later had one child, daughter Ann. [4]

Richards died of a heart attack. His interment is at Oak Park Cemetery in Claremont, California. (A news story in the March 26, 1964, issue of the Santa Cruz Sentinel says that services were held at Forest Lawn Memorial Park.) [5]

Selected filmography

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Andy Devine</span> American actor (1905–1977)

Andrew Vabre Devine was an American character actor known for his distinctive raspy, crackly voice and roles in Western films, including his role as Cookie, the sidekick of Roy Rogers in 10 feature films. He also appeared alongside John Wayne in films such as Stagecoach (1939), The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and How the West Was Won. He is also remembered as Jingles on the TV series The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok from 1951 to 1958, as Danny McGuire in A Star Is Born (1937), and as the voice of Friar Tuck in the Disney Animation Studio film Robin Hood (1973).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Charles Lane (actor, born 1905)</span> American actor (1905–2007)

Charles Lane was an American character actor and centenarian whose career spanned 72 years. Lane gave his last performance at the age of 101 as a narrator in 2006. Lane appeared in many Frank Capra films, including Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), You Can't Take It with You (1938), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Arsenic and Old Lace (1944), It's a Wonderful Life (1946) and Riding High (1950).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Noah Beery Jr.</span> American actor (1913-1994)

Noah Lindsey Beery was an American actor often specializing in warm, friendly character roles similar to many portrayed by his Oscar-winning uncle, Wallace Beery. Unlike his more famous uncle, however, Beery Jr. seldom broke away from playing supporting roles. Active as an actor in films or television for well over half a century, he was best known for playing James Garner's character's father, Joseph "Rocky" Rockford, in the NBC television series The Rockford Files (1974–1980). His father, Noah Nicholas Beery enjoyed a similarly lengthy film career as an extremely prominent supporting actor in major films, although the elder Beery was also frequently a leading man during the silent film era.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jay Novello</span> American actor (1904–1982)

Jay Novello was an American radio, film, and television character actor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Douglas Fowley</span> American actor (1911–1998)

Douglas Fowley was an American movie and television actor in more than 240 films and dozens of television programs, He is probably best remembered for his role as the frustrated movie director Roscoe Dexter in Singin' in the Rain (1952), and for his regular supporting role as Doc Holliday in The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp. He is the father of rock and roll musician and record producer Kim Fowley.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Frank Albertson</span> American actor (1919–1964)

Francis Healey Albertson was an American actor who had supporting roles in films such as It's a Wonderful Life (1946) and Psycho (1960).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Don Beddoe</span> American actor (1903–1991)

Donald Theophilus Beddoe was an American character actor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Richard Webb (actor)</span> American actor (1915–1993)

John Richard Webb was an American film, television and radio actor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Regis Toomey</span> American actor (1898–1991)

John Francis Regis Toomey was an American film and television actor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Dick Elliott</span> American actor (1886–1961)

Richard Damon Elliott was an American character actor who played in over 240 films from the 1930s until the time of his death.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lloyd Corrigan</span> American actor (1900–1969)

Lloyd Corrigan was an American film and television actor, producer, screenwriter, and director who began working in films in the 1920s. The son of actress Lillian Elliott, Corrigan directed films, usually mysteries such as Daughter of the Dragon starring Anna May Wong, before dedicating himself more to acting in 1938. His short La Cucaracha won an Academy Award in 1935.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Don "Red" Barry</span> American actor (1912–1980)

Donald Barry de Acosta, also known as Red Barry and Milton Poimboeuf, was an American film and television actor. He was nicknamed "Red" after appearing as the first Red Ryder in the highly successful 1940 film Adventures of Red Ryder with Noah Beery Sr.; the character was played in later films by "Wild Bill" Elliott and Allan Lane. Barry went on to bigger budget films following Red Ryder, but none reached his previous level of success. He played Red Doyle in the 1964 Perry Mason episode 'The Case of the Simple Simon'.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Paul Fix</span> American film and television character actor, best known for his work in Westerns

Peter Paul Fix was an American film and television character actor who was best known for his work in Westerns. Fix appeared in more than 100 movies and dozens of television shows over a 56-year career between 1925 and 1981. Fix was best known for portraying Marshal Micah Torrance, opposite Chuck Connors's character in The Rifleman from 1958 to 1963. He later appeared with Connors in the 1966 Western film Ride Beyond Vengeance and The Time Tunnel episode, ""End of the World".

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Andy Clyde</span> Scottish–American actor (1892–1967)

Andrew Allan Clyde was a Scottish-born American film and television actor whose career spanned more than four decades. In 1921 he broke into silent films as a Mack Sennett comic, debuting in On a Summer Day. He was the fifth of six children of theatrical actor, producer and manager John Clyde. Clyde's brother David and his sister Jean also became screen actors.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Dick Foran</span> American actor (1910–1979)

John Nicholas "Dick" Foran was an American actor, known for his performances in Western musicals and for playing supporting roles in dramatic pictures.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Frank Ferguson</span> American actor (1906–1978)

Frank S. Ferguson was an American character actor with hundreds of appearances in both film and television.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Norma Varden</span> English-American actress (1898–1989)

Norma Varden Shackleton, known professionally as Norma Varden, was an English-American actress with a long film career.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">James Flavin</span> American actor (1906-1976)

James William Flavin Jr. was an American character actor whose career lasted for nearly half a century.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Dick Wessel</span> American actor (1913–1965)

Richard Michael Wessel was an American film actor who appeared in more than 270 films between 1935 and 1966. He is best remembered for his only leading role, a chilling portrayal of strangler Harry "Cueball" Lake in Dick Tracy vs. Cueball (1946), and for his appearances as comic villains opposite The Three Stooges.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Mary Treen</span> American actress

Mary Treen was an American film and television actress. A minor actress for much of her career, she managed to secure a plain, unassuming niche for herself in the Hollywood of the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s.

References

  1. "Author of "Since You Went Away" and Two Members of Cast Formerly of This Locality". Sunday Times Signal. Ohio, Zanesville. October 1, 1944. p. 1. Retrieved June 24, 2016 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  2. 1 2 3 4 "Addison Richards". Internet Movie Database . Retrieved January 10, 2013.
  3. Billy Hathorn, "Roy Bean, Temple Houston, Bill Longley, Ranald Mackenzie, Buffalo Bill, Jr., and the Texas Rangers: Depictions of West Texans in Series Television, 1955 to 1967", West Texas Historical Review , Vol. 89 (2013), p. 104
  4. "Former Ogden Actor Has Top Role". The Deseret News. Utah, Salt Lake City. April 6, 1943. p. 11. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  5. "Rites Held For Character Actor Addison Richards". Santa Cruz Sentinel. California, Santa Cruz. March 26, 1964. p. 8. Retrieved June 24, 2016 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg