Adekunle Fajuyi

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Adekunle Fajuyi
Fajuyi-Adekunle.JPG
Military Governor of Western Nigeria
In office
15 January 1966 29 July 1966
Succeeded by Robert Adeyinka Adebayo
Personal details
Born26 June 1926
Ado Ekiti, Nigeria
Died29 July 1966(1966-07-29) (aged 40)
Ibadan
Political partyNone (Military)

Francis Adekunle Fajuyi MC BEM (26 June 1926 – 29 July 1966) was a Nigerian soldier of Yoruba origin. [1] [2] [3] and the first military governor of the former Western Region, Nigeria.

Military Cross third-level military decoration of the British Armed Forces, Commonwealth officers

The Military Cross (MC) is the third-level military decoration awarded to officers and other ranks of the British Armed Forces, and formerly awarded to officers of other Commonwealth countries.

British Empire Medal British medal awarded for meritorious civil or military service

The British Empire Medal is a British medal awarded for meritorious civil or military service worthy of recognition by the Crown. The current honour was created in 1922 to replace the original medal, which had been established in 1917 as part of the Order of the British Empire.

Yoruba people Ethnic group of West Africa

The Yorùbá people are an African ethnic group that inhabits western Africa. The Yoruba constitute about 44 million people in total. The majority of this population is from Nigeria, where the Yorùbá make up 21% of the country's population, according to the CIA World Factbook, making them one of the largest ethnic groups in Africa. Most Yoruba people speak the Yoruba language, which is the Niger-Congo language with the largest number of native, L1 or first language speakers.

Originally a clerk, Fajuyi of Ado Ekiti joined the army in 1943 and as a sergeant in the Nigeria Signal Squadron, Royal West African Frontier Force, was awarded the British Empire Medal in 1951 [4] for helping to contain a mutiny in his unit over food rations. He was trained at the Eaton Hall Officer Candidate School in the United Kingdom from July 1954 until November 1954, when he was short-service commissioned. [5] In 1961, as the 'C' Company commander with the 4 battalion, Queen's Own Nigeria Regiment under Lt. Col. Price, Major Fajuyi was awarded the Military Cross for actions in North Katanga and extricating his unit from an ambush. [6] On completion of Congo operations, Fajuyi became the first indigenous commander of the 1st battalion in Enugu, a position he held until just before the first coup of January 1966, when he was posted to Abeokuta as garrison commander. When Major General Ironsi emerged as the new C-in-C on 17 January 1966, he appointed Fajuyi the first military governor of the Western Region.

Ado Ekiti Place in Ekiti State, Nigeria

Ado Ekiti is a city in southwest Nigeria, the state capital and headquarters of the Ekiti State. The population in 2006 was 308,621. The people of Ado Ekiti are mainly of the Ekiti sub-ethnic group of the Yoruba. Ado Ekiti City has a State owned University - the University of Ado Ekiti now Ekiti State University Ado-Ekiti, a privately owned University - Afe Babalola University Ado-Ekiti, a Polytechnic - the Federal Polytechnic, Ado-Ekiti, Federal University Oye, FUOYE, Oye-Ekiti, privately owned polytechnic Crown polytechnic, Odo,Ado-Ekiti two local television and radio stations, Nigeria Television Authority Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State Television (BSES), Radio Ekiti, Progress FM Ado Ekiti.One private Radio Voice fm Various commercial enterprises operate in Ado Ekiti. The city is the trade centre for a farming region where yams, cassava, grain, and tobacco are grown. Cotton is also grown for weaving.

The West African Frontier Force (WAFF) was a multi-battalion field force, formed by the British Colonial Office in 1900 to garrison the West African colonies of Nigeria, Gold Coast, Sierra Leone and Gambia. In 1928, it received royal recognition, becoming the Royal West African Frontier Force (RWAFF).

Mutiny is a criminal conspiracy among a group of people to openly oppose, change, or overthrow a lawful authority to which they are subject. The term is commonly used for a rebellion among members of the military against their superior officers, but it can also occasionally refer to any type of rebellion against authority figures or governances.

Assassination

He was assassinated by the revenge seeking counter-coupists led by Major T. Y Danjuma on July 29, 1966, at Ibadan, along with General Johnson Aguiyi-Ironsi, the Head of State and Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces of the Federal Republic of Nigeria; who had arrived in Ibadan on July 28, 1966 to address a conference of natural rulers of Western Nigeria. [7] The bloody overthrow of the civilian regime of Prime Minister Sir Tafawa Balewa's government had taken place six months earlier in which the Prime Minister and other top government functionaries, especially of northern Nigerian extraction, were killed.

Ibadan Metropolis in Oyo, Nigeria

Ibadan is the capital and most populous city of Oyo State, Nigeria. With a population of over 3 million, it is the third most populous city in Nigeria after Lagos and Kano; it is the country's largest city by geographical area. At the time of Nigeria's independence in 1960, Ibadan was the largest and most populous city in the country, and the second most populous in Africa behind Cairo.

Johnson Aguiyi-Ironsi Nigerian soldier

Johnson Thomas Umunnakwe Aguiyi-Ironsi MVO, MBE was the first Nigerian Military Head of State. He seized power in the ensuing chaos following the 15 January 1966 military coup, serving as the Nigerian Head of State from 16 January 1966 until his assassination on 29 July 1966 by a group of mutinous Northern Nigerian soldiers who were led by Major Theophilus Danjuma, Major Ibrahim Badamusi Babangida, and General Murtala Mohammed were army soldiers who revolted against his government in what was popularly called the July Counter Coup.

Commander is a common naval and air force officer rank. Commander is also used as a rank or title in other formal organisations, including several police forces.

Related Research Articles

The history of Nigeria can be traced to prehistoric settlers (Nigerians) living in the area as early as 1100 BC. Numerous ancient African civilizations settled in the region that is today Nigeria, such as the Kingdom of Nri, the Benin Empire, and the Oyo Empire. Islam reached Nigeria through the Borno Empire between and Hausa States around during the 11th century, while Christianity came to Nigeria in the 15th century through Augustinian and Capuchin monks from Portugal. The Songhai Empire also occupied part of the region. Lagos was invaded by British forces in 1851 and formally annexed in 1861. Nigeria became a British protectorate in 1901. Colonization lasted until 1960, when an independence movement succeeded in gaining Nigeria its independence.

C. Odumegwu Ojukwu Nigerian politician and military leader

Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu was a Nigerian military officer and politician who served as the military governor of the Eastern Region of Nigeria in 1966 and the leader of the breakaway Republic of Biafra from 1967 to 1970. He was active as a politician from 1983 to 2011, when he died aged 78.

Nigerian Civil War 1967–1970 civil war in Nigeria

The Nigerian Civil War, also known as the Biafran War and the Nigerian-Biafran War, was a war fought between the government of Nigeria and the secessionist state of Biafra. Biafra represented nationalist aspirations of the Biafran people, whose leadership felt they could no longer coexist with the Northern-dominated federal government. The conflict resulted from political, economic, ethnic, cultural and religious tensions which preceded Britain's formal decolonization of Nigeria from 1960 to 1963. Immediate causes of the war in 1966 included ethno-religious riots in Northern Nigeria, a military coup, a counter-coup and persecution of Igbo living in Northern Nigeria. Control over the lucrative oil production in the Niger Delta played a vital strategic role.

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Patrick Chukwuma Kaduna Nzeogwu was born on 26 February 1937 in Kaduna and died in a mysterious circumstance on 29 July 1967 in Nsuka sector during the Nigeria Civil War.

Major General Joseph Nanven Garba was a Nigerian general, diplomat, and politician who served as president of the United Nations General Assembly from 1989 to 1990.

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This article is about the particular significance of the year 1966 to Nigeria and its people. See also: Timeline of Nigerian history.

The 1966 Nigerian counter-coup, or the so-called "July Rematch", was the second of many military coups in Nigeria. It was masterminded by Lt. Colonel Murtala Muhammed and many northern military officers. The coup began as a mutiny at roughly midnight on July 28, 1966 and was a reaction to the killings of Northern politicians and Officers by mostly Igbo soldiers on January 15, 1966 The July mutiny/counter coup resulted in the murder of Nigeria's first military Head of State General Johnson Aguiyi-Ironsi and Lt Colonel Adekunle Fajuyi in Ibadan by disgruntled northern non-commissioned officers (NCOs). Upon the termination of Ironsi's government, Lt. Colonel Yakubu Gowon was appointed Head of State by the July 1966 coup conspirators.

Mobolaji Johnson Nigerian politician

Mobolaji Olufunso Johnson is a retired Nigerian Army Brigadier and former military Governor of Lagos State from May 1967 to July 1975 during the military regime of General Yakubu Gowon. As Governor of Lagos, his administration supervised the unpopular demolition of Ajele Cemetery in the early 1970s.

Robert Adeyinka Adebayo was a Nigerian Army Major General who served as governor of the now defunct Western State of Nigeria, 1966–1971. He was also Chief of Staff of the Nigerian Army and was Commandant of the Nigerian Defence Academy.

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Chief Victor Babaremilekun Adetokunboh Fani-Kayode, Q.C., SAN, CON (1921–1995) was a leading Nigerian politician, aristocrat, nationalist, statesman and lawyer. He was elected deputy premier of the Western Region of Nigeria in 1963 and he played a major role in Nigeria's legal history and politics from the late 1940s until 1995.

Sir Francis Akanu Ibiam was a distinguished medical missionary who was appointed Governor of Eastern Region, Nigeria from December 1960 until January 1966 during the Nigerian First Republic. From 1919 to 1951, he was known as Francis Ibiam, and from 1951 to 1967, Sir Francis Ibiam.

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The 1966 Nigerian coup d'état began on 15 January 1966, when mutinous Nigerian soldiers led by Chukwuma Kaduna Nzeogwu and Emmanuel Ifeajuna killed 22 people including the Prime Minister of Nigeria, many senior politicians, many senior Army officers, and sentinels on protective duty. The coup plotters attacked the cities of Kaduna, Ibadan, and Lagos while also blockading the Niger and Benue River within a two-day span of time before the coup plotters were subdued. The General Officer Commanding, of the Nigerian Army, Johnson Aguiyi-Ironsi then used the coup as a pretext to annex power, ending Nigeria's nascent democracy. It was one of the events that led to the Nigerian Civil War.

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T. O. S. Benson

Theophilus Owolabi Shobowale Benson, commonly known as T.O.S. Benson, was a Nigerian lawyer who became one of the most prominent Yoruba politicians in the period leading up to Nigerian independence in 1960. He served as the Minister of Information, Broadcasting and Culture in the first post-independence government. Benson was imprisoned for several months after the first military coup of 1966. He returned to practice as a barrister, and was recognised as a prominent Yoruba chief.

Lalupon is a community on the outskirt of Ibadan located in Lagelu Local Government of Oyo State.

References

  1. I. A. Akinjogbin. Milestones and concepts in Yoruba history and culture: a key to understanding Yoruba history. Olu-Akin Publishers, 2002. p. 120.
  2. Beatrice Akpu Inyang Eleje. Roots, My Love, My Destiny. iUniverse, 2012. ISBN   978-1-4759-3467-0.
  3. Frederick Forsyth (2015). Biafra Story: The Making of an African Legend. Pen and Sword. p. 30. ISBN   978-1-4738-6099-5.
  4. London Gazette: 1 June 1951 Issue 39243, Page 3087
  5. London Gazette: 21 January 1955, Issue 40389, Page 500
  6. London Gazette 19 December 1961 Issue 42545, Page 9289
  7. Sally Dyson. Nigeria: the birth of Africa's greatest country : from the pages of Drum magazine. Spectrum Books, 1998. ISBN   978-978-029-014-6.