Administrative regions of Greece

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Administrative regions of Greece
Διοικητικές περιφέρειες της Ελλάδας  (Greek)
Un-greece.png
Category Unitary state
Location Hellenic Republic
Number13 Regions
1 Autonomous Region
Populations197,810 (North Aegean) – 3,812,330 (Attica)
Areas2,307 km2 (891 sq mi) (Ionian Islands) – 18,810 km2 (7,260 sq mi) (Central Macedonia)
Government Central government
Regional governments
Theocratic government (Athos)
Subdivisions Regional units

The administrative regions of Greece (Greek : περιφέρειες, romanized: periféries) are the country's thirteen first-level administrative entities, each comprising several second-level units, originally known as prefectures and, since 2011, as regional units.

Contents

History

The current regions were established in July 1986 (the Presidential Decree officially establishing them was signed in 1987), by decision of the Interior Minister Menios Koutsogiorgas as second-level administrative entities, complementing the prefectures (Law 1622/1986). [1] Before 1986, there was a traditional division into broad historical–geographical regions (γεωγραφικά διαμερίσματα), which, however, was often arbitrary; not all of the pre-1986 traditional historical-geographic regions had official administrative bodies. Although the post-1986 regions were mostly based on the earlier divisions, they are usually smaller and, in a few cases, do not overlap with the traditional definitions: for instance, the region of Western Greece, which had no previous analogue, comprises territory belonging to the Peloponnese peninsula and the traditional region of Central Greece.

As part of a decentralization process inspired by Interior Minister Alekos Papadopoulos, they were accorded more powers in the 1997 Kapodistrias reform of local and regional government. They were transformed into fully separate entities by the 2010 Kallikratis Plan (Law 3852/2010), which entered into effect on 1 January 2011. In the 2011 changes, the government-appointed general secretary (γενικός γραμματέας) was replaced with a popularly elected regional governor (περιφερειάρχης) and a regional council (περιφερειακό συμβούλιο) with 5-year terms. Many powers of the prefectures, which were also abolished or reformed into regional units, were transferred to the region level. The regional organs of the central government were in turn replaced by seven decentralized administrations, which group from one to three regions under a government-appointed general secretary.

List of administrative regions

Peripheries of Greece numbered.svg

  1. Attica / Αττική
  2. Central Greece / Στερεά Ελλάδα
  3. Central Macedonia / Κεντρική Μακεδονία
  4. Crete / Κρήτη
  5. Eastern Macedonia and Thrace / Ανατολική Μακεδονία και Θράκη
  6. Epirus / Ήπειρος
  7. Ionian Islands / Ιόνια νησιά
  8. North Aegean / Βόρειο Αιγαίο
  9. Peloponnese / Πελοπόννησος
  10. South Aegean / Νότιο Αιγαίο
  11. Thessaly / Θεσσαλία
  12. Western Greece / Δυτική Ελλάδα
  13. Western Macedonia / Δυτική Μακεδονία
  14. Monastic Republic of Mount Athos / Άγιον Όρος
Map showing modern regions of Greece

Bordering the region of Central Macedonia there is one autonomous region, Mount Athos (Agion Oros, or "Holy Mountain"), an autonomous monastic community under Greek sovereignty. It is located on the easternmost of the three large peninsulas jutting into the Aegean from the Chalkidiki peninsula.

Administrative RegionSeatArea
(km2)
Population
(residents)
Population Density
(residents/km2)
Gross domestic product
(million €)
Per capita gross domestic product
()
1 Attica Athens 3,8083,812,3301001.11110,54628,997
2 Central Greece Lamia 15,549546,87035.1710,53719,007
3 Central Macedonia Thessaloniki 18,8111,874,59099.6632,28516,559
4 Crete Heraklion 8,336621,34074.5411,24318,421
5 Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Komotini 14,157606,17042.829,26515,272
6 Epirus Ioannina 9,203336,65036.585,07914,221
7 Ionian Islands Corfu 2,307206,47089.504,13017,726
8 North Aegean Mytilene 3,836197,81051.573,33016,638
9 Peloponnese Tripoli 15,490581,98037.579,80916,580
10 South Aegean Ermoupoli 5,286308,61058.387,64624,828
11 Thessaly Larissa 14,037730,73052.0611,60815,772
12 Western Greece Patras 11,350680,19059.9310,65914,332
13 Western Macedonia Kozani 9,451282,12029.855,50618,786
(14) Mount Athos Karyes 3362,1466.38

See also

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References

  1. Ν.1622/86 «Τοπική Αυτοδιοίκηση - Περιφερειακή Ανάπτυξη - Δημοκρατικός Προγραμματισμός», (ΦΕΚ 92/τ.Α΄/14-7-1986)