Adolf IX of Berg

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Adolf IX of Berg (also referred to as Adolf VI) (c. 1280 – 3 April 1348) was the eldest son of Henry of Berg, Lord of Windeck and Agnes of the Mark. [1]

Henry of Berg, Lord of Windeck was the son of Adolf VII of Berg and Margaret of Hochstaden. He was the younger brother of Adolf VIII of Berg and William I of Berg.

In 1308, Adolf succeeded as Count of Berg upon the death of his uncle William I of Berg who had no children. Adolf was an important and loyal supporter of Ludwig IV of Bavaria, helping him since 1314 in the war of succession. As a result of Adolf's 1312 marriage to Agnes of Cleves, he received the Rhine customs of Duisberg as a dowry and these were confirmed as an imperial fief by Emperor Louis in 1314. He continued the constant feuds between the House of Berg and the Archbishops of Cologne. In 1327/28, he joined Louis on his trip to Rome where he was crowned as Emperor. Adolf received the privilege to mint silver which he did at Wipperfürth. In 1337 Adolf joined the English-German Alliance which caused the start of the Hundred Years' War.

William I of Berg was the son of Count Adolf VII of Berg and of Margaret of Hochstaden.

Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor Holy Roman Emperor

Louis IV, called the Bavarian, of the house of Wittelsbach, was King of the Romans from 1314, King of Italy from 1327, and Holy Roman Emperor from 1328.

Silver Chemical element with atomic number 47

Silver is a chemical element with symbol Ag and atomic number 47. A soft, white, lustrous transition metal, it exhibits the highest electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and reflectivity of any metal. The metal is found in the Earth's crust in the pure, free elemental form, as an alloy with gold and other metals, and in minerals such as argentite and chlorargyrite. Most silver is produced as a byproduct of copper, gold, lead, and zinc refining.

In 1312 Adolf was married to Agnes of Cleves (c. 1295 – aft. 1361), daughter of Dietrich VII, Count of Cleves and Margaret of Habsburg-Kiburg. He died on 3 April 1348 without children and was succeeded by his only surviving niece, Margaret of Ravensberg by right of her mother, and her husband Gerhard VI of Jülich as Count and Countess of Berg.

Dietrich VII, Count of Cleves

Dietrich VII (1256–1305) was Count of Cleves from 1275 through 1305. He was the son of Dietrich VI, Count of Cleves and his wife Aleidis von Heinsberg.

Margaret of Ravensberg was the daughter and heiress of Otto IV, Count of Ravensberg and Margaret of Berg-Windeck.

Gerhard VI of Jülich, Count of Berg and Ravensberg was the son of William V, Duke of Jülich and Joanna of Hainaut.

Thus, the Counties of Berg and Ravensburg came in 1348 under the house of Jülich, and were in 1437 united with the County of Jülich. In 1511 all three passed into the house of Cleves.

County of Ravensberg countship

The County of Ravensberg was a historical county of the Holy Roman Empire. Its territory was in present-day eastern Westphalia, Germany at the foot of the Osning or Teutoburg Forest.

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Duchy of Berg former German state and dukedom

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Duchy of Jülich duchy

The Duchy of Jülich comprised a state within the Holy Roman Empire from the 11th to the 18th centuries. The duchy lay left of the Rhine river between the Electorate of Cologne in the east and the Duchy of Limburg in the west. It had territories on both sides of the river Rur, around its capital Jülich – the former Roman Iuliacum – in the lower Rhineland. The duchy amalgamated with the County of Berg beyond the Rhine in 1423, and from then on also became known as Jülich-Berg.

Duchy of Cleves State of the Holy Roman Empire

The Duchy of Cleves was a State of the Holy Roman Empire which emerged from the mediaeval Hettergau (de). It was situated in the northern Rhineland on both sides of the Lower Rhine, around its capital Cleves and the towns of Wesel, Kalkar, Xanten, Emmerich, Rees and Duisburg bordering the lands of the Prince-Bishopric of Münster in the east and the Duchy of Brabant in the west. Its history is closely related to that of its southern neighbours: the Duchies of Jülich and Berg, as well as Guelders and the Westphalian county of Mark. The Duchy was archaically known as Cleveland in English.

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Margaret of Cleves, also spelled Margaretha or Margarethe was the wife of Count Adolf II of the Marck and mother of Adolf III of the Marck. She was a daughter of Count Dietrich VIII of Cleves and Margaret of Guelders, who was a daughter of Reginald I of Guelders.

References

  1. Walther Möller, Stammtafeln westdeutscher Adelsgeschlechter im Mittelalter (Darmstadt, 1922, reprint Verlag Degener & Co., 1995), Vol. 3, page 211.
Preceded by
William I
Count of Berg
13081348
Succeeded by
Gerhard VI of Jülich