Adolfo de la Huerta

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Adolfo de la Huerta
Adolfo de la Huerta.jpg
38th President of Mexico
In office
June 1, 1920 November 30, 1920
Preceded by Venustiano Carranza
Succeeded by Álvaro Obregón
Personal details
Born
Felipe Adolfo de la Huerta Marcor

(1881-05-26)May 26, 1881 [1]
Guaymas, Sonora
DiedJuly 9, 1955(1955-07-09) (aged 74)
Mexico, DF
NationalityMexican
Political party Liberal Constitutionalist Party (PLC), later National Cooperativist Party (PNC)
Spouse(s)Clara Oriol

Felipe Adolfo de la Huerta Marcor (Spanish pronunciation:  [aˈðolfo ðelaˈweɾta] ; May 26, 1881 – July 9, 1955), known as Adolfo de la Huerta, was a Mexican politician and 38th President of Mexico from June 1 to November 30, 1920, following the overthrow of Mexican president Venustiano Carranza.

President of Mexico Head of state of the country of Mexico

The President of Mexico, officially known as the President of the United Mexican States, is the head of state and government of Mexico. Under the Constitution, the president is also the Supreme Commander of the Mexican armed forces. The current President is Andrés Manuel López Obrador, who took office on December 1, 2018.

Venustiano Carranza Mexican politician and president of Mexico

Venustiano Carranza Garza was one of the main leaders of the Mexican Revolution, whose victorious northern revolutionary Constitutionalist Army defeated the counter-revolutionary regime of Victoriano Huerta and then defeated fellow revolutionaries after Huerta's ouster. He secured power in Mexico, serving as head of state from 1915–1917. With the promulgation of a new revolutionary Mexican Constitution of 1917, he was elected president, serving from 1917 to 1920.

Contents

Biography

He was born on May 26, 1881.

As Governor of the northern state of Sonora, he led the Revolution of Agua Prieta, which put an end to the presidency of Venustiano Carranza, who was killed during the revolt. It was then that de la Huerta was appointed interim President by Congress. [2]

Sonora State of Mexico

Sonora, officially Estado Libre y Soberano de Sonora, is one of 31 states that, with Mexico City, comprise the 32 federal entities of United Mexican States. It is divided into 72 municipalities; the capital city is Hermosillo. Sonora is bordered by the states of Chihuahua to the east, Baja California to the northwest and Sinaloa to the south. To the north, it shares the U.S.–Mexico border with the states of Arizona and New Mexico, and on the west has a significant share of the coastline of the Gulf of California.

Plan of Agua Prieta

The Plan of Agua Prieta was a manifesto, or plan, drawn up by three revolutionary generals of the Mexican Revolution, declaring themselves in revolt against the government of President Venustiano Carranza. It was proclaimed by Obregón on 22 April 1920, in English and 23 April in Spanish in the northern border city of Agua Prieta, Sonora.

Pancho Villa and his army surrendered during de la Huerta's presidency. When Álvaro Obregón was declared the victor of the 1920 presidential election, de la Huerta stepped down and became the Secretariat of Finance and Public Credit, [3] and in that role, negotiated the De la Huerta–Lamont Treaty.

Pancho Villa Mexican revolutionary

Francisco "Pancho" Villa was a Mexican revolutionary general and one of the most prominent figures of the Mexican Revolution.

Álvaro Obregón Mexican politician, president of Mexico

Álvaro Obregón Salido was a general in the Mexican Revolution, who became President of Mexico from 1920 to 1924. He supported Sonora's decision to follow Governor of Coahuila Venustiano Carranza as leader of a revolution against the Huerta regime. Carranza appointed Obregón commander of the revolutionary forces in northwestern Mexico and in 1915 appointed him as his minister of war. In 1920, Obregón launched a revolt against Carranza, in which Carranza was assassinated; he won the subsequent election with overwhelming support.

The De la Huerta–Lamont Treaty was a treaty signed in 1922 between Mexico and the International Committee of Bankers on Mexico (ICBM) on Mexico's substantial debts after the Mexican Revolution.

De la Huerta started a failed revolt in 1923 against fellow Sonoran president Obregón, whom he denounced as corrupt, [4] after Obregón endorsed Plutarco Calles as his successor. [5] Catholics, conservatives and a considerable portion of the army officers, who felt Obregón had reversed Carranza's policy of favoring the army at the expense of the farmer-labor sector, supported de la Huerta. [5] With his superb organizing ability and popular support, Obregón crushed the rebellion and forced de la Huerta into exile. [5] On March 7, 1924, de la Huerta fled to Los Angeles and Obregón ordered the execution of every rebel officer with a rank higher than a major. [5]

Plutarco Elías Calles President of Mexico (1924–1928)

Plutarco Elías Calles was a Mexican general and politician. He was the powerful interior minister under President Álvaro Obregón, who chose Calles as his successor. The 1924 Calles presidential campaign was the first populist presidential campaign in the nation's history, as he called for land redistribution and promised equal justice, more education, additional labor rights, and democratic governance. Calles indeed tried to fulfill his promises during his populist phase (1924–26) but later entered a State atheism phase (1926–28).

Los Angeles City in California

Los Angeles, officially the City of Los Angeles and often known by its initials L.A., is the most populous city in California, the second most populous city in the United States, after New York City, and the third most populous city in North America. With an estimated population of four million, Los Angeles is the cultural, financial, and commercial center of Southern California. The city is known for its Mediterranean climate, ethnic diversity, Hollywood and the entertainment industry, and its sprawling metropolis. Los Angeles is the largest city on the West Coast of North America.

He was later invited to return to Mexico by President Lázaro Cárdenas in 1935 and died on July 9, 1955 in Mexico City. [1]

Lázaro Cárdenas President of Mexico

Lázaro Cárdenas del Río was a general in the Constitutionalist Army during the Mexican Revolution and a statesman who served as President of Mexico between 1934 and 1940. He is best known for nationalization of the oil industry in 1938 and the creation of Pemex, the government oil company. He also revived agrarian reform in Mexico, expropriating large landed estates and distributing land to small holders in collective holdings (ejidos).

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Adolfo de la Huerta". Archived from the original on 12 February 2010. Retrieved 2010-02-18.
  2. "Obregon Last Man to Serve Full Term as President". Reading Times . p. 4. Retrieved 5 January 2016 via Newspapers.com.
  3. "Gen. Obregon's Death Ends Stirring Career". The Wilkes-Barre Record. p. 10 via Newspapers.com.
  4. http://mexicanhistory.org/MexicanRevolutiontimeline.htm
  5. 1 2 3 4 http://www.mexconnect.com/articles/280-the-mexican-revolution-consolidation-1920-40-part-2

Further reading

Enrique Krauze Mexican academic and writer

Enrique Krauze Kleinbort, widely known as Enrique Krauze, is a Mexican public intellectual, historian, essayist, critic, producer, and publisher. He has written numerous books about the Mexican Revolution and leading figures in Mexican history, as well as economic analysis of the nation's history. The journalist Jon Lee Anderson describes him as "arguably [Mexico]'s most prominent public intellectual".

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Political offices
Preceded by
Venustiano Carranza
President of Mexico
June 1 – November 30, 1920
Succeeded by
Álvaro Obregón