Aeromonas infection

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Aeromonas infections may cause skin infections manifesting as cellulitis, pustules, and furuncles. [1] :279 An infection usually only causes mild infections of the skin but can also cause a more a serious infection called gastroenteritis? [2] [3]

Cellulitis Human disease

Cellulitis is a bacterial infection involving the inner layers of the skin. It specifically affects the dermis and subcutaneous fat. Signs and symptoms include an area of redness which increases in size over a few days. The borders of the area of redness are generally not sharp and the skin may be swollen. While the redness often turns white when pressure is applied, this is not always the case. The area of infection is usually painful. Lymphatic vessels may occasionally be involved, and the person may have a fever and feel tired.

These can sometimes be spread by leech bites. [4]

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Group A streptococcal infection

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<i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> species of bacterium

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<i>Vibrio</i> genus of bacteria

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Gangrene serious and potentially life-threatening condition

Gangrene is a type of tissue death caused by a lack of blood supply. Symptoms may include a change in skin color to red or black, numbness, swelling, pain, skin breakdown, and coolness. The feet and hands are most commonly affected. Certain types may present with a fever or sepsis.

Necrotizing fasciitis infection that results in the death of the bodys soft tissue

Necrotizing fasciitis (NF), commonly known as flesh-eating disease, is an infection that results in the death of parts of the body's soft tissue. It is a severe disease of sudden onset that spreads rapidly. Symptoms include red or purple skin in the affected area, severe pain, fever, and vomiting. The most commonly affected areas are the limbs and perineum.

Plantar fasciitis Human disease

Plantar fasciitis is a disorder of the connective tissue which supports the arch of the foot. It results in pain in the heel and bottom of the foot that is usually most severe with the first steps of the day or following a period of rest. Pain is also frequently brought on by bending the foot and toes up towards the shin. The pain typically comes on gradually, and it affects both feet in about one third of cases.

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Mediastinitis inflammatory process affecting the mediastinum

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<i>Aeromonas</i> genus of bacteria

Aeromonas is a genus of Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that morphologically resemble members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Most of the 14 described species have been associated with human diseases. The most important pathogens are A. hydrophila, A. caviae, and A. veronii biovar sobria. The organisms are ubiquitous in fresh and brackish water.

Aeromonas veronii is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium found in fresh water and in association with animals. It can be a pathogen of humans and a beneficial symbiont of leeches. In humans A. veronii can cause diseases ranging from wound infections and diarrhea to septicemia in immunocompromised patients. Humans treated with medicinal leeches after vascular surgery can be at risk for infection from A. veronii and are commonly placed on prophylactic antibiotics. Most commonly ciprofloxacin is used but there have been reports of resistant strains leading to infection. In leeches, this bacterium is thought to function in the digestion of blood, provision of nutrients, or preventing other bacteria from growing.

Panton–Valentine leukocidin cytotoxin

Panton–Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is a cytotoxin—one of the β-pore-forming toxins. The presence of PVL is associated with increased virulence of certain strains (isolates) of Staphylococcus aureus. It is present in the majority of community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) isolates studied and is the cause of necrotic lesions involving the skin or mucosa, including necrotic hemorrhagic pneumonia. PVL creates pores in the membranes of infected cells. PVL is produced from the genetic material of a bacteriophage that infects Staphylococcus aureus, making it more virulent.

<i>Aeromonas hydrophila</i> species of bacterium

Aeromonas hydrophila is a heterotrophic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium mainly found in areas with a warm climate. This bacterium can be found in fresh or brackish water. It can survive in aerobic and anaerobic environments, and can digest materials such as gelatin and hemoglobin. A. hydrophila was isolated from humans and animals in the 1950s. It is the most well known of the species of Aeromonas. It is resistant to most common antibiotics and cold temperatures and is oxidase and indole positive.

<i>Elizabethkingia meningoseptica</i> species of bacterium

Elizabethkingia meningoseptica is a gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium widely distributed in nature. It may be normally present in fish and frogs; while it may be isolated from chronic infectious states, as in the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients. In 1959, the American bacteriologist Elizabeth O. King was studying unclassified bacteria associated with pediatric meningitis at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, when she isolated an organism that she named Flavobacterium meningosepticum. In 1994, it was reclassified in the genus Chryseobacterium and renamed Chryseobacterium meningosepticum(chryseos = "golden" in Greek, so Chryseobacterium means a golden/yellow rod similar to Flavobacterium). In 2005, a 16S rRNA phylogenetic tree of Chryseobacteria showed that C. meningosepticum along with C. miricola were close to each other but outside the tree of the rest of the Chryseobacteria and were then placed in a new genus Elizabethkingia named after the original discoverer of F. meningosepticum.

Apophysomyces is a genus of filamentous fungi that are commonly found in soil and decaying vegetation. Species normally grow in tropical to subtropical regions.

<i>Acinetobacter baumannii</i> species of bacterium

Acinetobacter baumannii is a typically short, almost round, rod-shaped (coccobacillus) Gram-negative bacterium. It can be an opportunistic pathogen in humans, affecting people with compromised immune systems, and is becoming increasingly important as a hospital-derived (nosocomial) infection. While other species of the genus Acinetobacter are often found in soil samples, it is almost exclusively isolated from hospital environments. Although occasionally it has been found in environmental soil and water samples, its natural habitat is still not known.

ST8:USA300 strain

ST8:USA300 is a strain of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that has emerged as a particularly antibiotic resistant epidemic that is responsible for rapidly progressive, fatal diseases including necrotizing pneumonia, severe sepsis and necrotizing fasciitis. The epidemiology of infections caused by MRSA is rapidly changing: in the past 10 years, infections caused by this organism have emerged in the community. The 2 MRSA clones in the United States most closely associated with community outbreaks, USA400 and USA300, often contain Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes and, more frequently, have been associated with skin and soft tissue infections. Outbreaks of community-associated (CA)-MRSA infections have been reported in correctional facilities, among athletic teams, among military recruits, in newborn nurseries, and among sexually active homosexual men. CA-MRSA infections now appear to be endemic in many urban regions and cause most MRSA infections.

<i>Streptococcus canis</i> species of bacterium

Streptococcus canis is a group G beta-hemolytic species of Streptococcus. It was first isolated in dogs, giving the bacterium its name. These bacteria are characteristically different from Streptococcus dysgalactiae, which is a human-specific group G species that has a different phenotypic chemical composition. S. canis is important to the skin and mucosal health of cats and dogs, but under certain circumstances, these bacteria can cause opportunistic infections. These infections were known to afflict dogs and cats prior to the formal description of the species in Devriese et al., 1986. However, additional studies revealed cases of infection in other mammal species, including cattle and even humans. Instances of mortality from S. canis in humans are very low with only a few reported cases, while actual instances of infection may be underreported due to mischaracterizations of the bacteria as S. dysgalactiae. This species, in general, is highly susceptible to antibiotics, and plans to develop a vaccine to prevent human infections are currently being considered.

References

  1. James, William D.; Berger, Timothy G.; et al. (2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN   0-7216-2921-0.
  2. Abuhammour, W.; Hasan, R.A.; Rogers, D. "Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Aeromonas hydrophilia in an immunocompetent child". Pediatr Emerg Care. 22: 48–51. doi:10.1097/01.pec.0000195755.66705.f8. PMID   16418613.
  3. Minnaganti, V.R.; Patel, P.J.; Iancu, D.; Schoch, P.E. "Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Aeromonas hydrophila". Heart Lung. 29: 306–8. doi:10.1067/mhl.2000.106723. PMID   10900069.
  4. Benjamin Maetz, Ralph Abbou, Jean Baptiste Andreoletti, and Catherine Bruant-Rodier, "Infections following the application of leeches: two case reports and review of the literature," 2012.