Agostino Patrizi de Piccolomini

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Agostino Patrizi de Piccolomini
Bishop of Pienza
Bishop of Montalcino
Church Catholic Church
Diocese Diocese of Pienza
Diocese of Montalcino
In office1484–1495
Predecessor Tommaso della Testa Piccolomini
Successor Francesco Todeschini-Piccolomini
Personal details
Died1495

Agostino Patrizi de Piccolomini (died 1495) was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Pienza (1484–1495) and Bishop of Montalcino (1484–1495). [1]

Contents

Biography

Having been private secretary of Pope Pius II, [2] on the latter's death on 14 August 1464, Patrizi entered the service of the pope's nephew, Cardinal Francesco Todeschini Piccolomini and in 1471, he accompanied the cardinal in that capacity on a journey to Germany to attend the Imperial Diet at Ratisbon. [3] Patrizi also served as a master of ceremonies in the papal chapel under Pope Paul II, resigning the post on 26 January 1484, subsequent to his appointment on 19 January as Bishop of Pienza and Bishop of Montalcino by Pope Sixtus IV. [1] [4] [5]

On 14 March 1484, he was consecrated bishop by Constantin Eruli, Bishop of Spoleto, with Gabriele Maccafani, Bishop of Marsi, and Giovanni Battista Capranica, Bishop of Fermo, serving as co-consecrators. [4] It was under his new title, Augustinus episcopus Pientinus et Ilcinensis. [6] that he participated in the papal consistory of 20 December 1484 and he is known to participated in the canonization of Saint Leopold of Austria on 6 January 1485. [7]

While he was to hold the titles of Bishop of Pienza and Bishop of Montalcino until his death in 1495, [1] [4] or perhaps more probably on 3 July 1496, [8] his real work was in Rome. He served as papal Master of Ceremonies from 1483, by appointment of Pope Paul II and after a brief interruption in 1484–1485, [9] he was reappointed by Pope Innocent VIII on 24 December 1485. [10] Having published on 1 March 1488 the first systematic description of ceremonies connected with the papal court, the Sacrarum caeremoniarum sive rituum ecclesiasticorum Sanctae Romanae ecclesiae libri tres. [11] he relinquished the post definitively in May that year.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Eubel, Konrad (1914). Hierarchia catholica medii et recentioris aevi. Vol. II (second ed.). Münster: Libreria Regensbergiana. p. 216.(in Latin)
  2. Mussari, p. 93, note 39.
  3. H. Kramer (1949), 'Agostino Patrizzis Beschreibung der Reise des Kardinallegaten Francesco Piccolomini zum Christentag in Regensburg 1471," Mitteilungen des Österr. Staatsarchivs, Erganzungsband 2 (Festschrift 1; 1949) 549-565. Francesco Buranelli (2006). Habemus papam : le elezioni pontificie da S. Pietro a Benedetto (in Italian). Roma: De Luca. p. 12.
  4. 1 2 3 Cheney, David M. "Bishop Agostino Patrizi de Piccolomini". Catholic-Hierarchy.org . Retrieved June 16, 2018. [self-published]
  5. Chow, Gabriel. "Bishop Agostino Patrizi de Piccolomini". GCatholic.org . Retrieved June 16, 2018. [self-published]
  6. Burchard I, p. 128.
  7. Burchard I, p. 135.
  8. Franz Wasner, "Fifteenth-century Tests on the Ceremonial of the papal 'Legatus a latere'." Traditio Vol. 14 (1958), pp. 295-358, at p. 336.
  9. Gaetano Moroni (ed.), Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica Vol. XLI (Venezia: Emiliana 1846), p. 177, column 2. Thuasne, in Burchard I, p. 2-3, note 2.
  10. Thuasne, in Burchard I, p. 2-3, note 2. Burchard I, p. 171.
  11. Agostino Patrizi Piccolomini (1582). Sacrarum caeremoniarum sive rituum ecclesiasticorum S. Rom. ecclesiae libri tres (in Latin). Venice: Apud Iuntas.

Sources

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Tommaso della Testa Piccolomini
Bishop of Pienza
1484–1495
Succeeded by
Francesco Todeschini-Piccolomini
Preceded by
Tommaso della Testa Piccolomini
Bishop of Montalcino
1484–1495
Succeeded by
Francesco Todeschini-Piccolomini