Aiguille Verte

Last updated
Aiguille Verte
Aiguille Verte ateabutnoe.jpg
The Aiguille Verte (centre) and the Aiguille d'Argentière (far left)
Highest point
Elevation 4,122 m (13,524 ft)
Prominence 689 m (2,260 ft)
Isolation 7.2 kilometres (4.5 mi)
Coordinates 45°56′05″N6°58′12″E / 45.93472°N 6.97000°E / 45.93472; 6.97000 Coordinates: 45°56′05″N6°58′12″E / 45.93472°N 6.97000°E / 45.93472; 6.97000
Naming
English translationGreen needle
Language of name French
Geography
France relief location map.jpg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Aiguille Verte
France
Location Haute-Savoie, France
Parent range Mont Blanc Massif, Graian Alps
Climbing
First ascent 29 June 1865 by Edward Whymper, Christian Almer and Franz Biner

The Aiguille Verte (French pronunciation:  [eɡɥij vɛʁt] ; 4,122 m (13,524 ft)), which is French for "Green Needle", is a mountain in the Mont Blanc massif in the French Alps.

Contents

It was first climbed on 29 June 1865 by Edward Whymper, Christian Almer and Franz Biner, a fortnight before the fateful first ascent of the Matterhorn. Whymper was unable to climb with his usual guide, Michel Croz, who had to wait for a client in Chamonix. As a result, Whymper hired the services of Christian Almer, who had been with Alfred Wills on the Wetterhorn in 1854. Whymper describes the push for the summit:

At the top of the small gully we crossed over the intervening rocks into the large one [the eponymous Whymper couloir]. At last ice replaced snow, and we turned over to the rocks upon its left. Charming rocks they were; granitic in texture, gritty, holding the nails well. At 9.45 we parted from them, and completed the ascent by a little ridge of snow which descended in the direction of the Aiguille du Moine. At 10.15 we stood on the summit (13, 541 feet [sic]), and devoured our bread and cheese with a good appetite. [1]

The second ascent was by Charles Hudson, T. S. Kennedy and Michel Croz via the Moine ridge. The first ascent of the Arête Sans was accomplished by Nicolas Jaeger in 1972.

Incidents

There have been a number of incidents where climbers have been killed or gone missing during climbing Aiguille Verte. The body of Patrice Hyvert, a French climber who went missing on 1 March 1982, was found on 9 July 2014. [2]

See also



Related Research Articles

Edward Whymper 19th/20th-century English mountaineer

Edward Whymper FRSE was an English mountaineer, explorer, illustrator, and author best known for the first ascent of the Matterhorn in 1865. Four members of his climbing party were killed during the descent. Whymper also made important first ascents on the Mont Blanc massif and in the Pennine Alps, Chimborazo in South America, and the Canadian Rockies. His exploration of Greenland contributed an important advance to Arctic exploration. Whymper wrote several books on mountaineering, including Scrambles Amongst the Alps.

Aiguille de Bionnassay mountain in the Mont-Blanc massif in the Alps

The Aiguille de Bionnassay is a mountain in the Mont Blanc massif of the Alps in France and Italy. It has been described as "one of the most attractive satellite peaks of Mont Blanc", and is located on its western side. The mountain's south and east ridges form the frontier between the two countries, and its summit is a knife-edge crest of snow and ice. Reaching it via any route provides a "splendid and serious snow and ice climb".

Grandes Jorasses mountain in the Mont Blanc massif in the Alps

The Grandes Jorasses is a mountain in the Mont Blanc massif, on the boundary between Haute-Savoie in France and Aosta Valley in Italy.

Barre des Écrins mountain in the French Alps

The Barre des Écrins is a mountain in the French Alps with a peak at 4102m altitude. It is the highest peak of the Massif des Écrins and the Dauphiné Alps and the most southerly alpine peak in Europe that is higher than 4,000 m. It is the only 4,000 m mountain in France that lies outside the Mont Blanc Massif. Before the annexation of Savoy in 1860 it was the highest mountain in France.

Charles Hudson (climber) Anglican chaplain, British mountain climber

Charles Hudson was an Anglican chaplain and mountain climber from Skillington, Lincolnshire, England.

Aiguille du Dru mountain

The Aiguille du Dru is a mountain in the Mont Blanc massif in the French Alps. It is situated to the east of the village of Les Praz in the Chamonix valley. "Aiguille" means "needle" in French.

Golden age of alpinism

The golden age of alpinism was the decade in mountaineering between Alfred Wills's ascent of the Wetterhorn in 1854 and Edward Whymper's ascent of the Matterhorn in 1865, during which many major peaks in the Alps saw their first ascents.

Aiguille Blanche de Peuterey mountain in the Mont Blanc massif in the Alps

The Aiguille Blanche de Peuterey is a mountain of the Mont Blanc massif in Italy. It is considered the most difficult and serious of the alpine 4000-m mountains to climb.

Aiguille dArgentière mountain in Switzerland

The Aiguille d'Argentière is a mountain in the Mont Blanc massif on the border between France and Switzerland.

Les Droites mountain in the Mont Blanc massif in the Alps

Les Droites is a mountain in the Mont Blanc massif in the French Alps and is the lowest of the 4000-metre peaks in the Alps. The mountain has two summits:

Christian Almer Swiss mountain guide (1826-1898)

Christian Almer was a Swiss mountain guide and the first ascentionist of many prominent mountains in the western Alps during the golden and silver ages of alpinism.

Mont Dolent mountain

Mont Dolent is a mountain in the Mont Blanc massif and lies on the border between Italy, Switzerland and France.

Michel Croz French mountain climber and guide

Michel Auguste Croz was a French mountain guide and the first ascentionist of many mountains in the western Alps during the golden age of alpinism. He is chiefly remembered for his death on the first ascent of the Matterhorn and for his climbing partnership with Edward Whymper.

Adolphus Warburton Moore British climber

Adolphus Warburton Moore (1841–1887) was a British civil servant and mountaineer.

Horace Walker English mountaineer

Horace Walker (1838–1908) was an English mountaineer who made many notable first ascents, including Mount Elbrus and the Grandes Jorasses.

James Eccles FGS was an English mountaineer and geologist who is noted for making a number of first ascents in the Alps during the silver age of alpinism.

Jean-Marc Boivin French multiple extreme sports participant

Jean-Marc Boivin was a French mountaineer, extreme skier, hang glider and paraglider pilot, speleologist, BASE jumper, award-winning film maker, and author. The holder of several altitude records for hang gliding and paragliding, the creator of numerous first ascents and first ski descents in the Alps, a member of the team that broke the record for a sub-glacial dive and the first person to paraglide from the summit of Mount Everest, Boivin was a pioneer of extreme sports. He died from injuries incurred after BASE jumping off Angel Falls in Venezuela, the highest waterfall in the world.

Armand Charlet French mountaineer and guide

Armand Charlet was a French mountaineer and mountain guide.

Tour Ronde mountain

The Tour Ronde is a mountain in the Mont Blanc massif of the Alps, situated on the border between France and Italy. It is a prominent mountain, some 3.5 km north-east of Mont Blanc, but is effectively part of a continuation of the south eastern spur of Mont Maudit which forms a frontier ridge between the two countries. It is easily accessible to mountaineers and provides not only a very good viewpoint from its summit of the Brenva face and the major peaks on the southern side of Mont Blanc, but it also offers a popular introduction to alpine climbing of all grades, including a north face ascent.

Goûter Route

The Goûter Route is one of the two normal mountaineering routes used to reach the summit of Mont Blanc in the Alps, ascending to a height of 4,808 metres (15,774 ft). The route lies on the north side of the mountain, in France. Usually reckoned as the easiest route up Mont Blanc, it is extremely popular with mountaineers, seeing thousands of ascents per year.

References

  1. E. Whymper, Scrambles amongst the Alps, 6th edition, London: John Murray, 1936, p. 284
  2. https://huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/09/patrice-hyvert-body-found-mont-blanc_n_5570551.html