Akasaka Biz Tower

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Akasaka Biz Tower
Akasaka-Biz-Tower-01.jpg
Akasaka Biz Tower
General information
StatusComplete
TypeOffices, shops
Location Akasaka, Minato, Tokyo, Japan
Coordinates 35°40′24″N139°44′12″E / 35.673329°N 139.736611°E / 35.673329; 139.736611 Coordinates: 35°40′24″N139°44′12″E / 35.673329°N 139.736611°E / 35.673329; 139.736611
Construction started2005
Completed2008
Height
Roof179.3 m (588 ft)
Top floor39
Technical details
Floor count42 (39 above ground, 3 underground)
Floor area187,194 m2 (2,014,940 sq ft)

The Akasaka Biz Tower (赤坂Bizタワー) is a skyscraper located in Akasaka, Tokyo, Japan.

The super high-rise is a result of the "Akasaka 5-chome TBS Development Project" into the Akasaka Sacas (赤坂サカス) complex together with the TBS Broadcasting Center, the Akasaka Blitz music venue, and the Akasaka ACT Theater. [1]

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References

  1. "TBS会館などを来夏から取り壊し、港区赤坂の再開発" (in Japanese). NikkeiBP.net. 2003-08-03. Archived from the original on 2011-07-19. Retrieved 2009-01-31.