Al Clark (film editor)

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Al Clark
Manuel Rojas and Randolph Scott in Buchanan Rides Alone.png
Manuel Rojas and Randolph Scott in Buchanan Rides Alone
Born(1902-09-15)September 15, 1902
Illinois United States
DiedJuly 13, 1971(1971-07-13) (aged 68)
Los Angeles, California, United States
OccupationFilm editor
Years active1933–1969
Spouse(s)Hazel Clark
ChildrenGeorge Clark

Al Clark (September 15, 1902 – July 13, 1971) was a prolific American film editor whose career spanned four decades, most of which was spent at Columbia Pictures. He was nominated for 5 Academy Awards and 1 Emmy during his career. He is credited with editing over 120 films, and towards the end of his career, in the 1960s, he also edited several television series. [1]

Contents

Career

Clark began his career in 1933 at the Poverty Row studio, Tower Productions. [1] The first film he worked on was the crime drama, The Important Witness . [2] In 1934 he would begin his long association with Columbia Pictures, on Lambert Hillyer's crime drama, Men of the Night . [3] His work on the 1937 screwball comedy, The Awful Truth , starring Irene Dunne and Cary Grant, earned him the first of his five Academy Award for Best Film Editing nominations. [4] In 1939 Clark co-edited, along with Gene Havlick, Frank Capra's classic Mr. Smith Goes to Washington , which stars Jean Arthur and James Stewart. The two editors were nominated for an Academy Award, losing to the editors for Gone With the Wind . [5] His third nomination came in 1940 for the classic political drama, All the King's Men , shared with Robert Parrish. The winner that year was Harry W. Gerstad for Champion . [6] In 1958, he and William A. Lyon edited the western Cowboy , starring Glenn Ford and Jack Lemmon. However, the editing award that year went to Adrienne Fazan for Gigi . [7] Clark's fifth and final Oscar nomination came in 1961, for his work on Pepe , which he co-edited by Viola Lawrence. That year the Oscar went to Daniel Mandell for The Apartment . [8] His long association with Columbia came to an end in 1962, with Clark's work on The Interns . [9] After his departure from Columbia, Clark edited only two more films: the 1963 comedy Hootenanny Hoot , for MGM; [10] and the 1969 Elvis Presley western, Charro! . [11]

Beginning in 1952 on NBC's Cavalcade of America , Clark worked sporadically on television shows. His television credits include Dennis the Menace (1959), The Twilight Zone (1963), Gilligan's Island (1964), Perry Mason (1963–65), and I Dream of Jeannie (1965). His final work in television was from 1967 to 1968 on The High Chaparral . His work on Ben Casey garnered him an Emmy Award nomination in 1963. [12]

Filmography

(Per AFI database) [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Al Clark". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 20, 2017. Retrieved August 21, 2017.
  2. "The Important Witness: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on August 26, 2017. Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  3. "Men of the Night: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on August 26, 2017. Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  4. "The 10th Academy Awards: 1938". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on September 1, 2017. Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  5. "The 12th Academy Awards: 1940". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on September 1, 2017. Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  6. "The 22nd Academy Awards: 1950". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on September 1, 2017. Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  7. "The 31st Academy Awards: 1959". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on September 1, 2017. Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  8. "The 33rd Academy Awards: 1961". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on September 1, 2017. Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  9. "The Interns: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on August 29, 2017. Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  10. "Hootenanny Hoot: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on August 29, 2017. Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  11. "Charro!: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 5, 2014. Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  12. "15th Emmy Awards Nominees and Winners: Outstanding Achievement in Film Editing for Television – 1963". National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on August 30, 2017. Retrieved August 29, 2017.