Albert, 4th duc de Broglie

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Albert, duc de Broglie
Broglie Albert.JPG
Prime Minister of France
In office
24 May 1873 22 May 1874
Preceded by Jules Dufaure
Succeeded by Ernest Courtot de Cissey
In office
17 May 1877 23 November 1877
Preceded by Jules Simon
Succeeded by Gaëtan de Rochebouët
Personal details
Born(1821-06-13)13 June 1821
Paris
Died19 January 1901(1901-01-19) (aged 79)
Paris
Political party Orléanist
Arms de Broglie Blason famille Broglie.svg
Arms de Broglie

Jacques-Victor-Albert, 4th duc de Broglie (French:  [albɛʁ də bʁɔj, - bʁœj]; 13 June 1821 19 January 1901) was a French monarchist politician, diplomat and writer (of historical works and translations).

Contents

Broglie was briefly Prime Minister of France, from May 1873 to May 1874.

Biography

Albert de Broglie was born in Paris, France, the eldest son of Victor, 3rd duc de Broglie, a liberal statesman of the July Monarchy, [1] and Albertine, baroness Staël von Holstein, the fourth child of Madame de Staël. He was therefore the great-grandson of Jacques Necker.

After a brief diplomatic career at Madrid and Rome, the revolution of 1848 caused Albert de Broglie to withdraw from public life and devote himself to literature. He had already published a translation of the religious system of Leibniz (1846). He now at once made his mark by his contributions to the Revue des deux mondes and the Orleanist and clerical organ Le Correspondant. These, and other contributions, brought him the succession to Lacordaire's seat in the Académie française in 1862, joining his father in this august society. [1]

In 1870 he succeeded his father as the 4th duc de Broglie, having previously been styled prince de Broglie. In the following year he was elected to the National Assembly for the département of the Eure, and a few days later (on 19 February) was appointed French Ambassador to London. [2]

In March 1872, however, in consequence of criticisms of his negotiations concerning the commercial treaties between Britain and France, he resigned his post and took his seat in the Assembly, where he became the leading light of the monarchical campaign against President Thiers. [3]

On the replacement of the latter by Marshal Mac-Mahon, the duc de Broglie became President of the Council and Minister for Foreign Affairs (May 1873), but in the reconstruction of the ministry on 26 November, after the passing of the Septennate, transferred himself to become the Minister of the Interior. His tenure of office was marked by an extreme conservatism, which roused the bitter hatred of the Republicans, while he alienated the Legitimist Party by his friendly relations with the Bonapartists, and the Bonapartists by an attempt to effect a compromise between the rival claimants to the monarchy. [3]

The result was the fall of the cabinet on 16 May 1874. Three years later (on 16 May 1877) he was entrusted with the formation of a new Cabinet, with the object of appealing to the country and securing a new chamber more favorable to the reactionaries than its predecessor had been. The result, however, was a decisive Republican majority. The duc de Broglie was defeated in his own district, and resigned office on 20 November. Defeated in 1885, he abandoned politics and reverted to his historical work, publishing a series of historical studies and biographies. He died in Paris on 19 January 1901, aged 79. [3]

1st Ministry (25 May – 26 November 1873)

PortfolioHolderParty
Vice-President of the Council of Ministers Albert de Broglie Royalist
Ministers
Minister of Foreign Affairs Albert de Broglie Royalist
Minister of the Interior Charles Beulé Royalist
Minister of Justice Jean Ernoul Royalist
Minister of Finance Pierre Magne Royalist
Minister of War General François Charles du Barail Bonapartiste
Minister of the Navy and Colonies Admiral Charles de Dompierre d'Hornoy None
Minister of Public Education, Fine Arts and Worship Anselme BatbieNone
Minister of Public Works Alfred Deseilligny Royalist
Minister of Agricolture and Commerce Marie Roullet de La Bouillerie Royalist

2nd Ministry (26 November 1873 – 22 May 1874)

PortfolioHolderParty
Vice-President of the Council of Ministers Albert de Broglie Royalist
Ministers
Minister of the Interior Albert de Broglie Royalist
Minister of Justice Octave Depeyre Royalist
Minister of Finance Pierre Magne Royalist
Minister of Foreign Affairs Louis Decazes Royalist
Minister of War General François Charles du Barail Bonapartiste
Minister of the Navy and Colonies Admiral Charles de Dompierre d'Hornoy None
Minister of Public Education, Fine Arts and Worship Oscar Bardi de Fourtou Royalist
Minister of Public Works Charles de Larcy Royalist
Minister of Agricolture and Commerce Alfred Deseilligny Royalist

3rd Ministry (17 May – 23 November 1877)

PortfolioHolderParty
President of the Council of Ministers Albert de Broglie Royalist
Ministers
Minister of Justice Albert de Broglie Royalist
Minister of Foreign Affairs Louis Decazes Royalist
Minister of the Interior Oscar Bardi de Fourtou Royalist
Minister of Finance Eugène Caillaux Royalist
Minister of War Brig. Gen. Jean Auguste Berthaut None
Minister of the Navy and Colonies Vice Admiral Albert Gicquel des Touches None
Minister of Public Education, Fine Arts and Worship Joseph Brunet Royalist
Minister of Public Works Auguste Paris Royalist
Minister of Agricolture and Commerce Alfred de Meaux Royalist

Bibliography

De Broglie edited: [3]

He published: [3]

Family

The Princesse de Broglie, the 1853 portrait of Princesse Albert de Broglie, nee Josephine-Eleonore-Marie-Pauline de Galard de Brassac de Bearn by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres. Ingres Princess Albert de Broglie.jpg
The Princesse de Broglie , the 1853 portrait of Princesse Albert de Broglie, née Joséphine-Eléonore-Marie-Pauline de Galard de Brassac de Béarn by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres.

On 18 June 1845, styled Prince de Broglie, he married Joséphine-Eléonore-Marie-Pauline de Galard de Brassac de Béarn (1825–1860). [4]

They had the following children:

Honours and titles

Notes

  1. 1 2 Chisholm 1911, p. 627.
  2. Chisholm 1911, pp. 627, 628.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 Chisholm 1911, p. 628.
  4. Tinterow, Gary; Conisbee, Philip; Naef, Hans (1999). Portraits by Ingres: Image of an Epoch. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. p. 447. ISBN   0-8109-6536-4.<

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References

Attribution

Further reading

Political offices
Preceded by
Comte de Rémusat
Minister of Foreign Affairs
1873
Succeeded by
Louis Decazes
Preceded by
Charles Beulé
Minister of the Interior
1873–1874
Succeeded by
Oscar Bardi de Fourtou
Preceded by
Louis Martel
Minister of Justice
1877
Succeeded by
François Le Pelletier
French nobility
Preceded by
Victor de Broglie
Duke of Broglie
1870–1901
Succeeded by
Victor de Broglie