Albert Naughton

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Albert Naughton
Albert Naughton - Widnes.jpeg
Personal information
Full nameAlbert Naughton
Born19 January 1929
Widnes, England
Died (aged 84)
Onchan, Isle of Man
Playing information
Height6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight12 st 6 lb (79 kg)
Position Centre, Loose forward
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1946/47–49 Widnes 95211065
1949–61 Warrington 34816700501
Total44318810566
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1949–53 Lancashire 73009
1953–56 England 30000
1954 Great Britain 20000
Source: [1] [2] [3]

Albert Naughton (19 January 1929 – 27 September 2013), also known by the nickname of "Ally", was an English World Cup winning professional rugby league footballer who played as a centre or loose forward in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s.

Contents

He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Lancashire, and at club level for Widnes and Warrington (captain). [1]

Background

Ally Naughton's birth was registered in Prescot district, Lancashire, England. [4] He retired to live in the Isle of Man, and he died aged 84 in Onchan, Isle of Man.

Playing career

International honours

Naughton won caps for England while at Warrington in 1953 against France (2 matches), in 1956 against France, [2] and won caps for Great Britain while at Warrington in the 1954 Rugby League World Cup against France (2 matches). [3]

Naughton played left-centre, i.e. number 4 Great Britain's 13-13 draw with France in the 1954 Rugby League World Cup second group match at Stade Municipal, Toulouse on Sunday 7 November 1954, and Great Britain's 16-12 victory over France in the 1954 Rugby League World Cup Final at Parc des Princes, Paris on Saturday 13 November 1954.

Mick Sullivan moved from centre to replace Frank Kitchen on the wing for Great Britain's 13-13 draw with France in the 1954 Rugby League World Cup second group match at Stade Municipal, Toulouse on Sunday 7 November 1954, and Great Britain's 16-12 victory over France in the 1954 Rugby League World Cup Final at Parc des Princes, Paris on Saturday 13 November 1954, with Ally Naughton replacing Mick Sullivan at left-centre, i.e. number 4.

Naughton also represented Great Britain while at Warrington between 1952 and 1956 against France (2 non-Test matches). [5]

Championship Final appearances

Naughton played in Warrington's 11-26 defeat by Workington Town in the Championship Final during the 1950–51 season, the 7-3 victory over Oldham in the Championship Final during the 1954–55 season at Maine Road on Saturday 14 May 1955, and played loose forward in the 10-25 defeat by Leeds in the Championship Final during the 1960–61 season at Odsal Stadium, Bradford, this was also his last match for Warrington. [6]

Challenge Cup Final appearance

Naughton played left-centre, i.e. number 4, in Warrington's 19-0 victory over Widnes in the 1949–50 Challenge Cup Final during the 1949–50 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 6 May 1950, in front of a crowd of 94,249, but was injured with an aggravated calf injury for both the 4-4 draw with Halifax in the 1953–54 Challenge Cup Final during the 1953–54 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 1 May 1954, and the 18-4 victory in the 1953–54 Challenge Cup Final replay during the 1953–54 season at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Wednesday 5 May 1954 in front of a 102,569+ crowd, he was replaced by a young Jim Challinor.

Naughton was on the winning side against his older brother John "Johnny" Naughton, the Widnes second-row, in the Challenge Cup Final during the 1949–50 season.

County Cup Final appearances

Albert Naughton played left-centre, i.e. number 4, and scored a try in Warrington's 5-28 defeat by Wigan in the 1950–51 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1950–51 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 4 November 1950, [7] and played in the 5-4 victory over St. Helens in the 1959–60 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1954–55 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 31 October 1959.

Club career

Naughton became the most expensive player in rugby league when he left Widnes for Warrington for £4,600 during the 1949–50 season, based on increases in average earnings, this would be approximately £396,900 in 2016), [8] he made his début for the Warrington in a friendly match in France, before making his competitive début, and scoring a try in the 17-0 victory over Whitehaven at Wilderspool Stadium. [9]

Honoured at Warrington Wolves

Naughton was inducted into the Warrington Wolves Hall of Fame in 2006 alongside Parry Gordon and George Thomas. [10]

Genealogical information

Naughton's marriage to Deirdre "De" (née Farrell) was registered during third ¼ 1956 in Prescot district. [11] Albert Naughton was the younger brother of the rugby league second-row who played in the 1940s and 1950s for Widnes; John "Johnny" Naughton (born 5 January 1920 in Prescot district), [12] Teresa "Tess" Naughton (birth registered during fourth ¼ 1921 in Prescot district), and rugby league footballer, Daniel "Danny" Naughton.

Outside of rugby league

Naughton took over from Harry Bath as landlord of the Britannia Inn, Scotland Road, Warrington during February 1957. [13]

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References

  1. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. 1 2 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 4 October 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. 1 2 "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 4 October 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  4. "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  5. Edgar, Harry (2007). Rugby League Journal Annual 2008 Page-110. Rugby League Journal Publishing. ISBN   0-9548355-3-0
  6. "Warrington legend Albert Naughton passes away at the age of 84". skysports.com. 30 September 2013. Retrieved 5 December 2013.
  7. "1950–1951 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  8. "Measuring Worth – Relative Value of UK Pounds". Measuring Worth. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  9. "Warrington great Naughton dies". sportinglife.com. 31 December 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  10. "Hall of Fame at Wire2Wolves.com". wire2wolves.com. 31 December 2012. Archived from the original on 9 April 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  11. "Marriage details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  12. "Johnny Naughton Statistics at rugby.widnes.tv". rugby.widnes.tv. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  13. "Albert Naughton, Warrington Wolves' last Championship-winning captain, dies aged 84". warringtonguardian.co.uk. 30 September 2013. Retrieved 2 October 2013.
Achievements
Preceded by
Jimmy Ledgard
Rugby league transfer record
Widnes to Warrington

1949–1950
Succeeded by
Joe Egan