Albert Steffen

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Albert Steffen
Albert Steffen - 1916.jpg
Born(1884-12-10)December 10, 1884
DiedJuly 13, 1963(1963-07-13) (aged 78)
Dornach, Switzerland
NationalitySwiss
OccupationPoet, artist

Albert Steffen (December 10, 1884, Wynau, Switzerland – July 13, 1963, Dornach, Switzerland) was a poet, painter, dramatist, essayist, and novelist. He joined the Theosophical Society in Germany in 1910, and the Anthroposophical Society in 1912 and became its president after the death of its founder, Rudolf Steiner, in 1925. Steffen was chief editor of the society's journal, Das Goetheanum, from 1921-1963. [1]

Wynau Place in Bern, Switzerland

Wynau is a municipality in the Oberaargau administrative district in the canton of Bern in Switzerland.

Switzerland federal republic in Central Europe

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a country situated in western, central, and southern Europe. It consists of 26 cantons, and the city of Bern is the seat of the federal authorities. The sovereign state is a federal republic bordered by Italy to the south, France to the west, Germany to the north, and Austria and Liechtenstein to the east. Switzerland is a landlocked country geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi). While the Alps occupy the greater part of the territory, the Swiss population of approximately 8.5 million people is concentrated mostly on the plateau, where the largest cities are to be found: among them are the two global cities and economic centres Zürich and Geneva.

Dornach Place in Solothurn, Switzerland

Dornach is a municipality in the district of Dorneck in the canton of Solothurn in Switzerland.

Steffen wrote many plays (Hiram and Solomon, Manes' Experience of Death), novels (Oasis of Humanity, The Renewal of the Association), and essays (The Artist Between West and East). Other than a volume of poetry published with the American poet Percy MacKaye, containing both of their poetry translated by each other, [2] few of his works have appeared in English.

Percy MacKaye American writer

Percy MacKaye (1875–1956) was an American dramatist and poet.

His earliest works, predating his encounter with anthroposophy, already manifest a spiritual awareness. His later works, which reflect a vision of the world permeated by metaphysical powers of good and evil, draw on a wide range of esoteric European and Asian traditions. [1]

Good and evil dichotomy in religion, ethics, and philosophy

In religion, ethics, philosophy, and psychology "good and evil" is a very common dichotomy. In cultures with Manichaean and Abrahamic religious influence, evil is usually perceived as the dualistic antagonistic opposite of good, in which good should prevail and evil should be defeated. In cultures with Buddhist spiritual influence, both good and evil are perceived as part of an antagonistic duality that itself must be overcome through achieving Śūnyatā meaning emptiness in the sense of recognition of good and evil being two opposing principles but not a reality, emptying the duality of them, and achieving a oneness.

Evil profound immorality

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References

  1. 1 2 "Steffen, Albert", Merriam Webster's Encyclopedia of Literature, 2002
  2. Albert Steffen and Percy MacKaye, In another Land -- Im anderen Land. Dornach 1937