Alexander Forrester (politician)

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Alexander Forrester ( c. 1711 – 2 July 1787) [1] was a British barrister and politician.

Circa – frequently abbreviated c., ca., or ca and less frequently circ. or cca. – signifies "approximately" in several European languages and as a loanword in English, usually in reference to a date. Circa is widely used in historical writing when the dates of events are not accurately known.

Forrester's family were Scottish Jacobites who had gone into exile in France with King James II, but little is known of his parents. [2]

Jacobitism political ideology

Jacobitism was the name of the political movement in Great Britain and Ireland that aimed to restore the House of Stuart to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland. The movement was named after Jacobus, the Latin form of James.

Forrester was educated at the Inner Temple, and became a successful barrister. After 1758, he specialised in cases before the House of Lords, including election petitions [2]

Inner Temple one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, commonly known as Inner Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court in London. To be called to the Bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales, a person must belong to one of these Inns. It is located in the wider Temple area of the capital, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.

Judicial functions of the House of Lords Historical judicial role of the UK House of Lords

The House of Lords of the United Kingdom, in addition to having a legislative function, historically also had a judicial function. It functioned as a court of first instance for the trials of peers, for impeachment cases, and as a court of last resort within the United Kingdom. In the latter case the House's jurisdiction was essentially limited to the hearing of appeals from the lower courts. Appeals were technically not to the House of Lords, but rather to the Queen-in-Parliament. By constitutional convention, only those lords who were legally qualified heard the appeals, since World War II usually in what was known as the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords rather than in the chamber of the House.

An election petition refers to the procedure for challenging the result of a Parliamentary election.

He was a Member of Parliament for Dunwich from 1658 to 1761, [1] for Okehampton from 1761 to 1768, [3] and for Newcastle-under-Lyme from 1768 to 1774. [4]

Dunwich was a parliamentary borough in Suffolk, one of the most notorious of all the rotten boroughs. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons from 1298 until 1832, when the constituency was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

Okehampton was a parliamentary borough in Devon, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons in 1301 and 1313, then continuously from 1640 to 1832, when the borough was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

Newcastle-under-Lyme (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Newcastle-under-Lyme is a constituency in north Staffordshire created in 1354 and represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2001 by Paul Farrelly of the Labour Party. It was the last to be co-represented by a member of the Conservative Party when it was dual-member, before the 1885 General Election which followed the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 coupled with the Reform Act 1884. In 1919 the local MP, industrialist and major local employer Josiah Wedgwood shifted his allegiance from the Liberal Party — the Lloyd George Coalition Liberals allying with the Conservatives — to the Labour Party and the seat has elected the Labour candidate who has stood since that date, a total of 29 elections in succession. Labour came close to losing the seat in 1969, 1986, 2015 and 2017.

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References

  1. 1 2 Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "D" (part 4)
  2. 1 2 Namier, Sir Lewis (1964). L. Namier; J. Brooke (eds.). "FORRESTER, Alexander (?1711-87), of Lincoln's Inn". The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1754-1790. Boydell and Brewer. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  3. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "O"
  4. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "N" (part 1)
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Sir Jacob Downing, Bt
Soame Jenyns
Member of Parliament for Dunwich
1758–1761
With: Sir Jacob Downing, Bt
Succeeded by
Eliab Harvey
Henry Fox
Preceded by
George Brydges Rodney
Robert Vyner
Member of Parliament for Okehampton
17611768
With: Wenman Coke
Succeeded by
Thomas Pitt
Thomas Brand
Preceded by
Sir Lawrence Dundas, Bt
Thomas Gilbert
Member of Parliament for Newcastle-under-Lyme
17681774
With: John Wrottesley 1768
Sir George Hay from 1768
Succeeded by
Sir George Hay
Viscount Chewton