Alexander Haggart

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Alexander Haggart
Alexander Haggart.png
Member of the House of Commons of Canada
In office
1909–1911
Constituency Winnipeg
Personal details
Born(1848-01-20)January 20, 1848
Peterborough, Ontario
DiedFebruary 19, 1927(1927-02-19) (aged 79)
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Political party Conservative
Spouse(s)
Elizabeth Littlehales
(m. 1887)
Education Victoria University
OccupationJurist, politician

Alexander Haggart (January 20, 1848 February 19, 1927) was a Canadian lawyer, judge and political figure in Manitoba. He represented Winnipeg in the House of Commons of Canada from 1909 to 1911 as a Conservative. [1]

Biography

He was born in Peterborough, Canada West, the son of Archibald Haggart and Elizabeth McGregor, and was educated at Victoria University in Cobourg. [2] He was called to the Ontario bar in 1878, first practised law in Toronto and then moved to Winnipeg in 1880, [3] where he practised in partnership with Hugh John Macdonald and Albert Clements Killam. Haggart served as a member of the Winnipeg School Board. [4] In 1887, he married Elizabeth Littlehales. [5] He resigned his seat in the House of Commons in 1911 to allow Robert Rogers to run for election. [1] He was president of the Law Society of Manitoba from 1906 to 1910. Haggart served in the Manitoba Court of Appeal from 1912 to 1920, retiring due to poor health. [3] He died in Winnipeg at the age of 79. [4]

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References

  1. 1 2 Alexander Haggart – Parliament of Canada biography
  2. Bryce, George (1906). "Manitoba, its resources and people". p. 427. Archived from the original on June 15, 2011. Retrieved July 29, 2009.
  3. 1 2 Harvey, Cameron (1977). "The Law Society of Manitoba, 1877-1977". pp. 236–7. Archived from the original on June 15, 2011. Retrieved July 29, 2009.
  4. 1 2 "Alexander Haggart (1848-1927)". Manitoba Historical Society. Retrieved July 29, 2009.
  5. "Who's who in western Canada". Canadian Press Association. 1911. p. 195. Archived from the original on June 15, 2011. Retrieved July 29, 2009.