Alfred Earle (bishop)

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Alfred Earle
Bishop of Marlborough
Memorial to Alfred Earle in Exeter Cathedral.jpg
Memorial in Exeter Cathedral
Diocese Diocese of London
In office1888–1918
Other posts Archdeacon of Totnes (1872–1888)
Dean of Exeter (1900–1918)
Orders
Ordination1858
Consecration1888
by  Edward Benson
Personal details
Born(1827-12-22)22 December 1827
Died28 December 1918(1918-12-28) (aged 91)
Torquay, Devon, United Kingdom
Nationality British
Denomination Anglican
Parents Henry Earle
Alma mater Hertford College, Oxford

Alfred Earle [1] (22 December 1827 28 December 1918) was the Bishop of Marlborough from 1888 to his death. [2] [3]

He was born the son of surgeon Henry Earle and was educated at Eton College and Hertford College, Oxford. He was ordained in 1858 and was a Curate of St Edmund's Salisbury and then Rector of Monkton Farleigh [4] (1863–1865) [5] before becoming vicar of West Alvington, South Huish, and South Milton. [5] He then spent fifteen years in Totnes, as, from approximately October 1872 [6] until his consecration in 1888, the Archdeacon of Totnes, and where he also became a rural dean and a Canon Residentiary of Exeter Cathedral (1886–1888). [5]

He was consecrated a bishop by Edward Benson, Archbishop of Canterbury, at St Paul's Cathedral on St Matthias' day (24 February) 1888. [7] [8] As Bishop of Marlborough, he was suffragan to Frederick Temple and Mandell Creighton as successive Bishops of London, and was given charge of the western part of the Diocese of London. [9] Alongside his bishopric, he also held two successive livings: Rector of St Michael, Cornhill (1888–1895), and Rector of St Botolph-without-Bishopsgate and a Prebendary of St Paul's (1896–1900). [5] Earle was often in ill-health during this period, and Alfred Barry (former Primate of Australia) frequently deputised for him; when Earle resigned his responsibilities for West London in June 1900, Barry took these up (but not the See). [10]

Installed as Dean of Exeter on 28 August 1900, Earle left London but nominally retained his See [11] until his death. He resigned the Deanery during 1918, [12] and died at the end of the year, [13] at Torquay, Devon, [14] in the week following his 91st birthday. [15]

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References

  1. The Times, 28 January 1888, p. 11, "University Intelligence: The degree of DD has been conferred on the Ven Alfred Earle"
  2. "The New Suffragan Bishop Of London". The Times , 9 January 1888, p. 10
  3. "Suffragan Bishop of London’s stipend"
  4. "Some old Devon churches"
  5. 1 2 3 4 Papers of Alfred Earle
  6. "Church news" . Church Times (#505). 4 October 1872. p. 447. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 4 January 2017 via UK Press Online archives.
  7. "Consecration of suffragan bishops" . Church Times (#1310). 2 March 1888. p. 186. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 4 January 2017 via UK Press Online archives.
  8. The Times , 25 February 1888, p. 10, "Consecration Of Suffragan Bishops"
  9. "Personal" . Church Times (#1955). 13 July 1900. p. 38. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 4 January 2017 via UK Press Online archives.
  10. "Church news" . Church Times (#1951). 15 June 1900. p. 690. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 19 September 2020 via UK Press Online archives.
  11. "Personal" . Church Times (#1962). 31 August 1900. p. 210. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 4 January 2017 via UK Press Online archives.
  12. "Church news" . Church Times (#2886). 17 May 1918. p. 370. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 4 January 2017 via UK Press Online archives.
  13. "Summary" . Church Times (#2919). 3 January 1919. p. 3. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 4 January 2017 via UK Press Online archives.
  14. "Clerical obituary" . Church Times (#2919). 3 January 1919. p. 9. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 4 January 2017 via UK Press Online archives.
  15. "Personal" . Church Times (#2917). 20 December 1918. p. 476. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 4 January 2017 via UK Press Online archives.
Church of England titles
Preceded by
John Downall
Archdeacon of Totnes
18721888
Succeeded by
Charles Wilkinson
In abeyance
Title last held by
Thomas Lancaster
Bishop of Marlborough
18881918
In abeyance
Preceded by
Benjamin Cowie
Dean of Exeter
19001918
Succeeded by
Henry Gamble