Alfredo Fioravanti

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Alfredo Adolfo Fioravanti (1886–1963) was an Italian sculptor, who was part of the team that forged the Etruscan terracotta warriors in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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References

Authenticity in Art: The Scientific Detection of Forgery by Stuart James Fleming ISBN   0-85498-029-6