Alice Chetwynd Ley

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Alice Chetwynd Ley
BornAlice Chetwynd Humphrey
(1913-10-12)12 October 1913
Halifax, Yorkshire, England, UK
Died2004 (aged 9091)
Pen nameAliceChetwynd Ley
OccupationTeacher, novelist
NationalityBritish
Period1959–1989
Genre romance
SpouseKenneth James Ley
Children2
Richard James Humphrey Ley
Graham Kenneth Hugh Ley
Website
alicechetwyndley.co.uk

Alice Chetwynd Ley, née Humphrey (born 12 October 1913 in Halifax, Yorkshire, England, UK - d. 2004) was a British writer of romance novels from 1959 to 1989.

Contents

She was the sixth elected Chairman (1971–1973) of the Romantic Novelists' Association and was named honor life member. [1]

Biography

Born Alice Chetwynd Humphrey on 12 October 1913 in Halifax, Yorkshire, England, UK, she studied at King Edward VI Grammar School in Birmingham. On 3 February 1945, she married Kenneth James Ley. They had two sons; Richard James Humphrey Ley and Graham Kenneth Hugh Ley.

She was teacher at Harrow College of Higher Education. In 1962, she obtained a diploma in Sociology at London University, in connection thus she obtained the Gilchrist Award of 1962. She was lecturer in Sociology and Social History, from 1968 to 1971.

Under her married name, Alice Chetwynd Ley, she published romance novels from 1959 to 1986. She was also tutor in Creative Writing, from 1962 to 1984. She was elected the sixth Chairman (1971–1973) of the Romantic Novelists' Association and was named honor life member.

Alice Chetwynd died in 2004.

Bibliography

[2] [3]

Novels

Eversley Saga

  1. The Clandestine Betrothal (1967)
  2. The Toast of the Town (1968)
  3. A Season at Brighton (1971)

Anthea & Justin Rutherford Saga

  1. A Reputation Dies (1984)
  2. A Fatal Assignation (1987)
  3. Masquerade of Vengeance (1989)

References and sources

  1. Past RNA Officers, archived from the original on 11 March 2016, retrieved 7 April 2009
  2. Alice Chetwynd Ley at fantasticfiction
  3. Alice Chetwynd Ley at alicechetwyndley.co.uk


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