Alice Stanley, Countess of Derby

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Alice Montagu
Countess of Derby
Born(1862-08-15)15 August 1862
Westminster
Died23 July 1957(1957-07-23) (aged 94)
Coworth Park
Spouse(s) Edward Stanley, 17th Earl of Derby
Issue
Father William Montagu, 7th Duke of Manchester
Mother Luise Fredericke Auguste, Countess von Alten

Alice Maud Olivia Stanley, Countess of Derby (née Montagu; 15 August 1862, Westminster 23 July 1957, Coworth Park) was born the daughter of the 7th Duke of Manchester and his wife, Countess Louise von Alten.

Westminster area of central London, within the City of Westminster

Westminster is a government district and former capital of the Kingdom of England in Central London within the City of Westminster, part of the West End, on the north bank of the River Thames. Westminster's concentration of visitor attractions and historic landmarks, one of the highest in London, includes the Palace of Westminster, Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Cathedral.

William Montagu, 7th Duke of Manchester British politician

William Drogo Montagu, 7th Duke of Manchester KP, known as Lord Kimbolton from 1823 to 1843 and as Viscount Mandeville from 1843 to 1855, was a British peer and Conservative Member of Parliament.

Marriage

On 5 January 1889, she married Lord Stanley of Bickerstaffe. Lord Stanley succeeded to his father's title of Earl of Derby in 1908, whereupon she became Countess of Derby. They had two sons and one daughter. [1] From 1900 to 1910,[ citation needed ] Alice was a Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Alexandra. [1]

Edward Stanley, 17th Earl of Derby British politician

Edward George Villiers Stanley, 17th Earl of Derby,, styled Mr Edward Stanley until 1886, then The Hon Edward Stanley and then Lord Stanley from 1893 to 1908, was a British soldier, Conservative politician, diplomat, and racehorse owner. He was twice Secretary of State for War and also served as British Ambassador to France.

Earl of Derby title in the Peerage of England

Earl of Derby is a title in the Peerage of England. The title was first adopted by Robert de Ferrers, 1st Earl of Derby, under a creation of 1139. It continued with the Ferrers family until the 6th Earl forfeited his property toward the end of the reign of Henry III and died in 1279. Most of the Ferrers property and the Derby title were then held by the family of Henry III. The title merged in the Crown upon Henry IV's accession to the throne in 1399.

In August 1901, Lady Stanley named the battleship HMS Exmouth, built by Cammell Laird at Birkenhead. [2] In April 1913 the Countess also had the honor of christening the newest and largest Cunard Company steamship, The RMS Aquitania, at Clydebank, Scotland.

Battleship large armored warship with a main battery consisting of heavy caliber guns

A battleship is a large armored warship with a main battery consisting of large caliber guns. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries the battleship was the most powerful type of warship, and a fleet of battleships was considered vital for any nation that desired to maintain command of the sea.

HMS <i>Exmouth</i> (1901)

HMS Exmouth was a Duncan-class pre-dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy. Built to counter a group of fast Russian battleships, Exmouth and her sister ships were capable of steaming at 19 knots, making them the fastest battleships in the world. The Duncan-class battleships were armed with a main battery of four 12-inch (305 mm) guns and they were broadly similar to the London-class battleships, though of a slightly reduced displacement and thinner armour layout. As such, they reflected a development of the lighter second-class ships of the Canopus-class battleship. Exmouth was laid down by Laird Brothers at Birkenhead in August 1899, launched in August 1901, and completed in May 1903.

Cammell Laird British shipbuilding company

Cammell Laird is a British shipbuilding company. The company came about following the merger of Laird Brothers of Birkenhead and Johnson Cammell & Co. of Sheffield at the turn of the twentieth century. The company also built railway rolling stock until 1929, when that side of the business was separated and became part of the Metropolitan-Cammell Carriage and Wagon Company.

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References

  1. 1 2 Grieves, Keith (2004). "Stanley, Edward George Villiers, seventeenth earl of Derby (1865–1948)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/36243.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  2. "Naval & Military intelligence - HMS Exmouth". The Times (36549). London. 2 September 1901. p. 5.