Allanson, Western Australia

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Allanson
Western Australia
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Allanson
Coordinates 33°20′S116°06′E / 33.33°S 116.1°E / -33.33; 116.1 Coordinates: 33°20′S116°06′E / 33.33°S 116.1°E / -33.33; 116.1
Population555 (2016 census) [1]
Established1912
Postcode(s) 6225
Elevation190 m (623 ft)
Location
LGA(s) Shire of Collie
State electorate(s) Collie-Preston
Federal Division(s) Forrest

Allanson is a town on the banks of the Collie River in the South West Region of Western Australia just west of Collie. The Coalfields Highway passes through the town.

Land was originally set aside for coal miners so that they could live close to the mines in 1898. A railway station named West Collie opened in the same year. The original townsite, also called West Collie, was gazetted in 1906. The original townsite was later discovered to be placed over commercially viable coal seams so a new townsite was founded in 1911 located a short distance from the original.

The new town was gazetted in 1912 and changed its name in 1916 to Allanson. The town was named after an MLA for the seat of Collie, Arthur Alan Wilson, who was in office from 1908 to 1947. [2]

Allanson restored its original bush school in 2002 after it operated in the town from 1911 to 1989 before being closed. A book A History of Allanson: Our Little Bush School has been written about people's memories of the school and community. [3]

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References

  1. Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Allanson (Locality)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 22 April 2019. OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
  2. Western Australian Land Information Authority. "History of country town names – A" . Retrieved 30 September 2008.
  3. "Collie Mail - Third edition for Allanson bush school book". 2003. Archived from the original on 5 August 2008. Retrieved 29 September 2008.