Allardyce Range

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Central South Georgia: Cumberland Bay; Thatcher Peninsula with King Edward Cove (Grytviken); Allardyce Range with the summit Mt. Paget (NASA imagery). Thatcher-Peninsula.jpg
Central South Georgia: Cumberland Bay; Thatcher Peninsula with King Edward Cove (Grytviken); Allardyce Range with the summit Mt. Paget (NASA imagery).

Coordinates: 54°25′S36°32′W / 54.417°S 36.533°W / -54.417; -36.533 The Allardyce Range (Spanish : Cordillera de San Telmo) is a mountain range rising south of Cumberland Bay and dominating the central part of South Georgia, a UK overseas territory. [1] It extends for 50 km (31 mi) from Mount Globus in the northwest to Mount Brooker in the southeast, with peaks of 2,000 to 2,935 m (6,562 to 9,629 ft) and including Mount Paget (2,935 m or 9,629 ft) the highest peak of the range and also the highest point in the UK territory. Other peaks of the range include Mount Roots.

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Spanish language Romance language

Spanish or Castilian, is a Romance language that originated in the Iberian Peninsula and today has over 450 million native speakers in Spain and in the Americas. It is a global language and the world's second-most spoken native language, after Mandarin Chinese.

Mountain range A geographic area containing several geologically related mountains

A mountain range or hill range is a series of mountains or hills ranged in a line and connected by high ground. A mountain system or mountain belt is a group of mountain ranges with similarity in form, structure, and alignment that have arisen from the same cause, usually an orogeny. Mountain ranges are formed by a variety of geological processes, but most of the significant ones on Earth are the result of plate tectonics. Mountain ranges are also found on many planetary mass objects in the Solar System and are likely a feature of most terrestrial planets.

Although not shown on the charts of South Georgia by Cook in 1775 or Bellingshausen in 1819, peaks of this range were doubtless seen by those explorers. The range was named c. 1915 after Sir William Lamond Allardyce (1861–1930), Governor of the Falkland Islands and Dependencies, 1904–14. [2]

James Cook 18th-century British explorer

Captain James Cook was a British explorer, navigator, cartographer, and captain in the Royal Navy. He made detailed maps of Newfoundland prior to making three voyages to the Pacific Ocean, during which he achieved the first recorded European contact with the eastern coastline of Australia and the Hawaiian Islands, and the first recorded circumnavigation of New Zealand.

Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen 19th-century Russian Navy officer, cartographer, and explorer

Fabian Gottlieb Thaddeus von Bellingshausen, a Baltic German naval officer in the Imperial Russian Navy, cartographer and explorer, who ultimately rose to the rank of admiral. He participated in the First Russian circumnavigation of the globe and subsequently became a leader of another circumnavigation expedition that discovered the continent of Antarctica.

Falkland Islands archipelago in the South Atlantic Ocean

The Falkland Islands is an archipelago in the South Atlantic Ocean on the Patagonian Shelf. The principal islands are about 300 miles east of South America's southern Patagonian coast, and about 752 miles from the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, at a latitude of about 52°S. The archipelago, with an area of 4,700 square miles, comprises East Falkland, West Falkland and 776 smaller islands. As a British overseas territory, the Falklands have internal self-governance, and the United Kingdom takes responsibility for their defence and foreign affairs. The Falkland Islands' capital is Stanley on East Falkland.

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Mount Paget mountain in South Georgia

Mount Paget is a summit of Allardyce Range on the South Atlantic/Antarctic island of South Georgia. It is the highest peak on the island, and also the highest peak in any territory under the sovereignty of the United Kingdom, twice the height of Ben Nevis, the highest mountain on the island of Great Britain.

Trojan Range

The Trojan Range is a mountain range rising to 2,760 metres (9,055 ft), extending northward from Mount Francais along the east side of Iliad Glacier, Anvers Island, in the Palmer Archipelago of the British Antarctic Territory. It was surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1955 and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) for the Trojans, one of the opposing sides in the Trojan War in Homer's Iliad.

Nordenskjöld Peak is a conspicuous, partly snow-covered mountain, 2,355 m (7,726 ft), which rises at the head of Nordenskjöld Glacier and stands close east of Mount Roots in the Allardyce Range of South Georgia. The name derives from nearby Nordenskjöld Glacier, and was given by David Ferguson, Scottish geologist who visited South Georgia in 1911-12.

Thatcher Peninsula South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands

Thatcher Peninsula is a mountainous peninsula in north-central South Georgia. Its total area is approximately 5,640 hectares, with roughly 1,620 ha covered in vegetation. It erminates to the north in Mai Point, rising between Cumberland West Bay to the west, and Cumberland East Bay and Moraine Fjord to the east. It is bounded to the southwest and south by Lyell Glacier and Hamberg Glacier. King Edward Cove on the east side of the peninsula is the site of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Grytviken station and the disused whaling station of the same name.

Mount Brooker is a mountain, 1,880 metres (6,170 ft) high, standing at the head of Webb Glacier and forming the last major summit in the southeast part of the Allardyce Range of South Georgia. The feature was identified as "Pic" or "Pikstock" by the German group of the International Polar Year Investigations, 1882–83. It was first climbed in 1955 by Ian M. Brooker, for whom it is named, and E.C. Webb, members of the British South Georgia Expedition, 1954–55, led by George Sutton.

Mount Sugartop mountain in South Georgia

Mount Sugartop is a prominent, partly snow-covered mountain, 2,325 m, standing 5 miles (8 km) northwest of Mount Paget in the Allardyce Range of South Georgia. The name "Sugarloaf Peak" has appeared on maps for this feature for many years, but the South Georgia Survey, following its 1951-52 surveying expedition, reported that the name Mount Sugartop is well established locally for this mountain. This latter name is approved on the basis of local usage.

Mount Cunningham mountain in South Georgia

Mount Cunningham is a mountain at the west end of South Georgia's Esmark Glacier. It is situated between Jossac Bight and Queen Maud Bay. With an elevation of 1,218 metres (3,996 ft), it is the 16th highest mountain in South Georgia. The mountain was named after Scottish mountaineer John Crabbe Cunningham as a memorial after his death on 31 January 1980, following a climbing accident when struck by waves off Holyhead.

Gjelstad Pass is a pass through the western part of the Allardyce Range of South Georgia, between Mount Corneliussen and Smillie Peak. It is the only pass yet discovered which gives access overland to the area south of the Allardyce Range. It was surveyed by the South Georgia Survey in the period 1951–57, and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for A. Gjelstad, a Norwegian engineer and factory owner, who between 1926 and 1932 invented various devices of great practical value to the whaling industry, including the "whale-claw," an apparatus for grasping the tails of whales for hauling them up the slipways of factory ships.

Smillie Peak is a rock peak, 1,765 m, standing 1 mile (1.6 km) east of Mount Corneliussen in the west extremity of the Allardyce Range of South Georgia. Surveyed by the SGS, 1951–52, and named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) for Gordon Smillie, SGS surveyor.

Paulsen Peak is a rock peak, 1,875 m, standing near the head of Lyell Glacier, 2 miles (3.2 km) northwest of Mount Sugartop in the Allardyce Range of South Georgia. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC), following mapping by the SGS, 1951–52, for Harald B. Paulsen (1898–1951), a leading figure in the Norwegian whaling industry.

Hodges Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Hodges Glacier is a small glacier 1 nautical mile (2 km) west of Grytviken, South Georgia, flowing from the south side of Petrel Peak to the foot of Mount Hodges. The name was recommended by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee and derives from association with Mount Hodges.

Nachtigal Peak is a rocky peak on a spur projecting northward from the southeast extremity of the Allardyce Range, South Georgia. It rises to 1,160 m (3,810 ft) at the west side of the head of Cook Glacier, 4 nautical miles east of Nordenskjold Peak. The name "Kleine Pic" was given to this feature by the German group of the International Polar Year Investigations, 1882-83. The SGS, 1951–52, reported that "Kleine Pic" is not particularly descriptive or distinctive for the peak described, and that name has been rejected. The name Nachtigal Peak, recommended by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1954, derives from nearby Nachtigal Glacier, which was named by the German group of 1882-83.

Mount Corneliussen is a mountain, 1,540 metres (5,050 ft) high, standing 1 nautical mile (2 km) north of Mount Globus at the west end of the Allardyce Range of South Georgia. It was surveyed by the South Georgia Survey in the period 1951–57, and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Norwegian engineers Carl and Erling Corneliussen, who between 1923 and 1938 were responsible for improvements in whaling equipment, especially devices in connection with explosive harpoons.

Sutton Crag is a crag, 1,490 metres (4,890 ft), standing north of and connected by a long ridge to the west peak of Mount Paget in the Allardyce Range of South Georgia. Charted and unofficially named Sentinel or Sentinel Peak by the British South Georgia Expedition, 1954-55. To avoid duplication with other "sentinel" names, the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1957 named this feature for George A. Sutton, leader of the expedition, who reached the summit in 1954.

Swinhoe Peak is a peak, 845 m, standing between Hamberg Glacier and Hestesletten on the north side of South Georgia. The peak was mapped by the Swedish Antarctic Expedition, 1901–04, under Nordenskjold. It was surveyed by the South Georgia Survey in the period 1951-57. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) for Ernest Swinhoe, Manager of the South Georgia Exploration Co., who visited South Georgia in 1905 to prospect for minerals and to consider the establishment of an experimental sheep ranch.

Mount Fagerli is a mountain rising to 1,880 metres (6,170 ft) in the Allardyce Range of South Georgia, standing 1 nautical mile (2 km) southwest of Marikoppa on the north side of Kjerulf Glacier. It was surveyed by the South Georgia Survey in the period 1951–57, and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Soren Fagerli, Manager of the Compañía Argentina de Pesca station in Grytviken from 1938 to 1948.

Henriksen Buttress is a prominent rock buttress, 1,970 metres (6,460 ft) high, standing 2 nautical miles (4 km) southeast of Mount Sugartop in the central part of the Allardyce Range of South Georgia. It was surveyed by the South Georgia Survey in the period 1951–57, and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Henrik N. Henriksen who, in 1909, built the South Georgia Whaling Company station at Leith Harbour, and was manager there from 1909 until 1920.

Mount Kling is a mountain, 1,845 m, between Nordenskjold Peak and Mount Brooker in the Allardyce Range of South Georgia. It was surveyed by the South Georgia Survey in the period 1951-57, and named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) for Alfred Kling, navigator of the Deutschland during the German Antarctic Expedition, 1911–12, under Filchner.

Solvay Mountains

The Solvay Mountains are a mountain range that rises to 1590 m and extends in an ENE–WSW direction in the south part of Brabant Island, in the Palmer Archipelago of Antarctica. They were discovered by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition of 1897–99, under Adrien de Gerlache, and named by him for Ernest-John Solvay, a supporter of the expedition. The name originally extended along the entire east coast of the island but has been limited to the prominent mountains in the south, while the principal group of mountains farther north was subsequently named Stribog Mountains, separated from Solvay Mountains by Aluzore Gap.

Larssen Peak is a peak, 1,550 metres (5,100 ft) high, between the Three Brothers and Marikoppa in the Allardyce Range of South Georgia. It was surveyed by the South Georgia Survey in the period 1951–57, and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Harald Larssen, manager at the Compañía Argentina de Pesca station, Grytviken, 1951–54.

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