Alumni Stadium

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Alumni Stadium
Alumni
AlumniStadium1.jpg
View of the interior of a stadium showing the seats and above them, the press and private boxes
Relief map of USA Massachusetts.png
Red pog.svg
Alumni Stadium
Location in Massachusetts
Usa edcp relief location map.png
Red pog.svg
Alumni Stadium
Location in the United States
Location140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467
Coordinates 42°20′6″N71°09′59″W / 42.33500°N 71.16639°W / 42.33500; -71.16639 Coordinates: 42°20′6″N71°09′59″W / 42.33500°N 71.16639°W / 42.33500; -71.16639
Owner Boston College
Operator Boston College
Capacity 44,500 (1995–present)
32,000 (1971–1994)
26,000 (1957–1970)
Surface1957–1969 Grass
1970–2003 AstroTurf
2004–2012 FieldTurf
2012–present AstroTurf GameDay Grass 3D60H
Construction
Broke groundApril 15, 1957 [1]
OpenedSeptember 21, 1957
Renovated1995
Expanded1971, 1995
Construction costUS$350,000
($3.12 million in 2018 dollars [2] )
ArchitectM. A. Dyer Company [3]
General contractorBowen Construction Co.
Tenants
Boston College Eagles (NCAA) (1957–present)
Boston Patriots (AFL) (1969)

Alumni Stadium is a football stadium located on the lower campus of Boston College in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, approximately six miles west of downtown Boston. It is the home of the Boston College Eagles. Its present seating capacity is 44,500.

College football Collegiate rules version of American/Canadian football, played by colleges and universities

College football is gridiron football consisting of American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football rules first gained popularity in the United States.

Stadium Place or venue for (mostly) outdoor sports, concerts, or other events

A stadium is a place or venue for (mostly) outdoor sports, concerts, or other events and consists of a field or stage either partly or completely surrounded by a tiered structure designed to allow spectators to stand or sit and view the event.

Boston College private research university in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, United States

Boston College is a private Jesuit research university in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. The university has more than 9,300 full-time undergraduates and nearly 5,000 graduate students. The university also has historical ties to Boston College High School in Dorchester, as both the high school and the college were once on one campus in the South End of Boston. It is a member of the 568 Group and the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities. Its main campus is a historic district and features some of the earliest examples of collegiate gothic architecture in North America.

Contents

History

Alumni Stadium's south facade, facing Beacon Street. Alumni Stadium stands.jpg
Alumni Stadium's south façade, facing Beacon Street.

Alumni Field, Boston College's first stadium opened in 1915 and was located just south of Gasson Quadrangle, on the site of the present Stokes Hall, a newly-built academic building for the humanities that opened in 2013. Before the building of Stokes, the area was known as The Dustbowl, a nickname that originated as a description of Alumni Field in the years when it was intensely used as a practice field, a baseball diamond, and a running track. Formally dedicated "as a memorial to the boys that were" on October 30, 1915, Alumni Field and its distinctive "maroon goal-posts on a field of green" were hailed in that evening's edition of the Boston Saturday Evening Transcript as "one of the sights in Boston." The original grandstands, which could accommodate 2,200 spectators in 1915, were enlarged over the subsequent years to 25,000. Nonetheless Alumni Field often proved too small for BC football games which were frequently held at Fenway Park, and later Braves Field, beginning in the 1930s.

Fenway Park Baseball stadium in Boston, Massachusetts

Fenway Park is a baseball park located in Boston, Massachusetts near Kenmore Square. Since 1912, it has been the home for the Boston Red Sox, the city's American League baseball team, and since 1953, its only Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise. It is the oldest ballpark in MLB. Because of its age and constrained location in Boston's dense Fenway–Kenmore neighborhood, the park has been renovated or expanded many times, resulting in quirky features including "The Triangle," Pesky's Pole, and the Green Monster in left field. It is the fourth-smallest among MLB ballparks by seating capacity, second-smallest by total capacity, and one of eight that cannot accommodate at least 40,000 spectators.

Braves Field former baseball stadium in Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Braves Field was a baseball park located in Boston, Massachusetts. Today the site is home to Nickerson Field on the campus of Boston University. The stadium was home of the Boston Braves of the National League from 1915–1952, prior to the Braves' move to Milwaukee in 1953. The stadium hosted the 1936 Major League Baseball All-Star Game and Braves home games during the 1948 World Series. The Boston Red Sox used Braves Field for their home games in the 1915 and 1916 World Series since the stadium had a larger seating capacity than Fenway Park. Braves Field was the site of Babe Ruth's final season, playing for the Braves in 1935. From 1929 to 1932, the Boston Red Sox played select regular season games periodically at Braves Field. On May 1, 1920, Braves Field hosted the longest major league baseball game in history – 26 innings, which eventually ended in a 1–1 tie.

Alumni Field, precursor to Alumni Stadium, ca. 1920 BCalumnifield.jpg
Alumni Field, precursor to Alumni Stadium, ca. 1920

On September 21, 1957, Alumni Stadium opened on Boston College's lower campus. The new stadium incorporated a football field encircled by a regulation track with a seating capacity of 26,000. The dedication game, a match-up with the Midshipmen of the U.S. Naval Academy, was orchestrated with the help of BC benefactor and then-Massachusetts Senator John F. Kennedy. Kennedy, who had received his honorary degree at Commencement Exercises in Alumni Field the previous year, would return to Alumni Stadium on a number of occasions over the course of his political career, including a 1963 Convocation Address, one of his last public appearances.

Seating capacity number of people who can be seated in a specific space, in terms of both the physical space available, and limitations set by law

Seating capacity is the number of people who can be seated in a specific space, in terms of both the physical space available, and limitations set by law. Seating capacity can be used in the description of anything ranging from an automobile that seats two to a stadium that seats hundreds of thousands of people. The largest sporting venue in the world, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, has a permanent seating capacity for more than 235,000 people and infield seating that raises capacity to an approximate 400,000.

Navy Midshipmen football

The Navy Midshipmen football team represents the United States Naval Academy in NCAA Division I FBS college football. The Naval Academy completed its final season as an FBS independent school in 2014, and became a single-sport member of the American Athletic Conference beginning in the 2015 season. The team has been coached by Ken Niumatalolo since December 2007. Navy has 19 players and three coaches in the College Football Hall of Fame and won the college football national championship in 1926 according to the Boand and Houlgate poll systems. The 1910 team also was undefeated and unscored upon. The mascot is Bill the Goat.

John F. Kennedy 35th president of the United States

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, often referred to by initials JFK and Jack, was an American politician who served as the 35th president of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963. Kennedy served at the height of the Cold War, and the majority of his work as president dealt with managing relations with the Soviet Union and Cuba. A Democrat, Kennedy represented Massachusetts in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate prior to becoming president.

Alumni Stadium has hosted numerous intellectual and cultural luminaries, religious leaders and heads of state as the venue for Boston College's annual Commencement Exercises since 1957. In addition to being the permanent home of the Boston College football team, Alumni Stadium hosted the Boston Patriots of the American Football League during the 1969 season.

American Football League Professional football league that merged with National Football League in 1970

The American Football League (AFL) was a major professional American football league that operated for ten seasons from 1960 until 1969, when it merged with the older National Football League (NFL), and became the American Football Conference. The upstart AFL operated in direct competition with the more established NFL throughout its existence. It was more successful than earlier rivals to the NFL with the same name, the 1926, 1936 and 1940 leagues, and the later All-America Football Conference.

As the home of the Boston College Eagles, Alumni Stadium has been the site of numerous notable moments in Boston College football history. On September 17, 2005, Alumni Stadium hosted BC's inaugural game as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

Atlantic Coast Conference American collegiate athletics conference

The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic conference located in the Southern United States. Based in Greensboro, North Carolina, the conference consists of fifteen member universities, each of whom compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)'s Division I, with its football teams competing in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest levels for athletic competition in US-based collegiate sports. The ACC sponsors competition in twenty-five sports with many of its member institutions' athletic programs held in high regard nationally. Current members of the conference are Boston College, Clemson University, Duke University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Florida State University, North Carolina State University, Syracuse University, the University of Louisville, the University of Miami, the University of North Carolina, the University of Notre Dame, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Virginia, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Wake Forest University.

Renovations

In 1971, the stadium was expanded to 32,000 seats and artificial turf and lights were installed. [4] The stadium was rebuilt again in 1988 as matching upper decks and a new press box were added. [5] The stadium underwent a major renovation before the 1994 season which eliminated the track and increased capacity to 44,500. Since 1998, a 65-foot (20 m)-high bubble of inflatable vinyl has covered the stadium from December to March and allowed the field to be used as a winter practice facility. The field surface itself was converted to FieldTurf before the 2004 season. In the summer before the 2005 football season, the $27 million Yawkey Athletics Center opened at Alumni Stadium's north end zone, and the logo of the Atlantic Coast Conference was added to the FieldTurf. For the 2012 season, Alumni Stadium was outfitted with new FieldTurf.

FieldTurf

FieldTurf is a brand of artificial turf playing surface. It is manufactured and installed by FieldTurf Tarkett, a division of French company Tarkett Inc. FieldTurf is headquartered in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and its primary manufacturing facility is located in Calhoun, Georgia, United States. With a design intended to more accurately replicate real grass, the new product rapidly gained popularity in the late 1990s and changed the industry.

Alumni Stadium panorama Alumni Stadium panorama.jpg
Alumni Stadium panorama

See also

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References

  1. Oslin, Reid; Flutie, Doug. Tales From The Boston College Sideline. Champaign, Illinois: Sports Publishing LLC. p. 109. ISBN   1-58261-546-2 . Retrieved September 29, 2011.
  2. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–" . Retrieved January 2, 2019.
  3. Architect's Drawing of the New Boston College Gymnasium and Football Stadium
  4. "Alumni Stadium: A to Z". www.bc.edu.
  5. "Alumni Stadium: A to Z". www.bc.edu.
Preceded by
Fenway Park
Home of the
Boston Patriots

1969
Succeeded by
Harvard Stadium