Amos G. Throop

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34°21′N117°47.9′W / 34.350°N 117.7983°W / 34.350; -117.7983 ., known for its 360-degree views stretching from the Mojave Desert all the way to the Pacific Ocean, sits on the Pacific Crest Trail and is also named after Mr. Throop. Another landmark named after him is Throop Unitarian Universalist Church, a Pasadena Unitarian Universalist congregation founded in 1923. Throop Street at 1300 West in Chicago also is named for him.

He was allegedly a descendant of Sir Adrian Scrope, the famous regicide, possibly of the English Scrope family. Amos Gager Throop's daughter, Martha married John C. Vaughan, founder of The Vaughan Seed Company. [5]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Centennial List of Mayors, City Clerks, City Attorneys, City Treasurers, and Aldermen, elected by the people of the city of Chicago, from the incorporation of the city on March 4, 1837 to March 4, 1937, arranged in alphabetical order, showing the years during which each official held office". Archived from the original on 4 September 2018. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  2. Council, Chicago (Ill ) City (1892). Journal of the Proceedings of the City Council . Retrieved 27 December 2020.
  3. "History of Caltech (includes photo of Throop)". Archived from the original on 4 August 2010. Retrieved 2010-07-26.
  4. U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Throop Peak
  5. "Martha Throop Vaughan" . Retrieved 2014-05-19.


Amos Gager Throop
Amos G. Throop 1840 (a).jpg
Throop in 1840
3rd Mayor of Pasadena
In office
1888–1890
Political offices
Preceded by
M.M. Parker
Mayor of Pasadena
1888-1890
Succeeded by
T.P. Lukens
Preceded by
Roscoe Thomas
Member of the Pasadena Board of City Trustees, Seat 1
1888-1890
Succeeded by
T.P. Lukens