Anaku

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Anaku (アナク) is a kata derived from Ananku (See Karate kata). It is translated as Expression Pivoting Form or Pivoting Swallow Form. This kata is typically taught to Go Kyu (Green Belt Kata). [1]

Anaku is used to teach two principles: shifting from Kiba Dachi to Zenkutsu Dachi to Kiba Dachi, and T'ung Gee Hsing's principle of pounding, which is hitting the same spot multiple times.

Chotoku Kyan is credited with recomposing this kata for Karate in 1895.

Bunkai

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References

  1. "Black Belt - Google Books". June 1998. Retrieved 2015-03-11.