Anbyon County

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Anbyŏn County

안변군
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha
   McCune-Reischauer Anbyŏn-gun
   Revised Romanization Anbyeon-gun
North Korea-Anbyon County-Chonsam Cooperative Farm-01.jpg
Chŏnsam Cooperative Farm, Anbyŏn
NK-Gangwon-Anbyon.png
Map of Kangwon showing the location of Anbyon
Country North Korea
Province Kangwon Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 2 workers' districts, 28 ri

Anbyŏn is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. Originally included in South Hamgyŏng province, it was transferred to Kangwŏn province in a September 1946 reshuffling of local government.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

Kangwon Province (North Korea) Province in North Korea

Kangwon Province is a province of North Korea, with its capital at Wŏnsan. Before the division of Korea in 1945, Kangwŏn Province and its South Korean neighbour Gangwon Province formed a single province that excluded Wŏnsan.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers and to the south it is bordered by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Contents

Physical features

The southwest portion of the county is bounded by the Masingryŏng (마식령산맥) and Taebaek mountains, which meet at the pass of Ch'ugaryŏng (추가령). The highest point is Paegamsan.

Taebaek Mountains mountain range on the Korean peninsula

The Taebaek Mountains are a mountain range that stretches across North Korea and South Korea. They form the main ridge of the Korean peninsula.

Anbyŏn's major streams include the Namdaech'ŏn and the Hakch'ŏn. The Anbyŏn Plain is situated along the Namdaech'ŏn's course. The temperature is warmer in the north than in the south.

Administrative divisions

Anbyŏn county is divided into 1 ŭp (town), 2 rodongjagu (workers' districts) and 28 ri (villages):

  • Anbyŏn-ŭp
  • Apkang-rodongjagu
  • Ryongdae-rodongjagu
  • Chungp'yŏng-ri
  • Ch'ŏnsam-ri
  • Hakch'ŏl-li
  • Hwasal-li
  • Kwap'yŏng-ri
  • Mihyŏl-li
  • Mop'ung-ri
  • Munsu-ri
  • Naesal-li
  • Namgye-ri
  • Ogye-ri
  • Ong-ri
  • Paehwa-ri
  • Paeyang-ri
  • Pisal-li
  • Pongsal-li
  • P'unghwa-ri
  • Ryŏngsil-li
  • Ryongsŏng-ri
  • Ryukhwa-ri
  • Samsŏng-ri
  • Sangŭm-ri
  • Sap'yŏng-ri
  • Sinhwa-ri
  • Songsal-li
  • Suraktong-ri
  • Tongp'o-ri
  • Wŏllang-ri

Economy

Agriculture

In the Anbyŏn Plain, rice-farming is the predominant industry. Orcharding also plays an important role.

Manufacturing

Tile manufacturing also takes place.

Mining

There are local deposits of gold, silver, copper and zinc, but they are not widely exploited.

Zinc Chemical element with atomic number 30

Zinc is a chemical element with the symbol Zn and atomic number 30. Zinc is a slightly brittle metal at room temperature and has a blue-silvery appearance when oxidation is removed. It is the first element in group 12 of the periodic table. In some respects zinc is chemically similar to magnesium: both elements exhibit only one normal oxidation state (+2), and the Zn2+ and Mg2+ ions are of similar size. Zinc is the 24th most abundant element in Earth's crust and has five stable isotopes. The most common zinc ore is sphalerite (zinc blende), a zinc sulfide mineral. The largest workable lodes are in Australia, Asia, and the United States. Zinc is refined by froth flotation of the ore, roasting, and final extraction using electricity (electrowinning).

Electricity generation

In 2000, construction of the Anbyŏn Youth Power Station, a hydroelectric facility, was completed. The workers were honored with a personal communique from Kim Jong-il. [1]

Kim Jong-il General Secretary of the Workers Party of Korea

Kim Jong-il was the second leader of North Korea. He ruled from the death of his father Kim Il-sung, the first leader of North Korea, in 1994 until his own death in 2011. He was an unelected dictator and was often accused of human rights violations.

Film-making

Anbyŏn is the setting for many North Korean films. Thus it has been dubbed the Hollywood of North Korea.

Chemicals

A chemical weapons storage facility is believed to be located in the county's Chiha-ri precinct. The facility is said to include numerous tunnels dug deep into the mountains, and may also host some biological weapons. [2]

Transport

The Kangwŏn and Kŭmgangsan Ch'ŏngnyŏn lines of the Korean State Railway pass through the county, which is also served by road.

Wildlife

Anbyŏn contains a 1000 ha site, Anbyŏn Field, that has been identified as an Important Bird Area by BirdLife International because it is a wintering ground for red-crowned cranes. [3]

See also

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References

  1. "Kim Jong Il proclaims completion of Anbyon Youth Power Station". KCNA. Retrieved 2006-11-09.
  2. "Anbyon: Chiha-ri Chemical Corporation". GlobalSecurity.org. Archived from the original on 9 November 2006. Retrieved 2006-11-09.
  3. "Anbyon field". Important Bird Areas factsheet. BirdLife International. 2013. Archived from the original on 2007-07-10. Retrieved 2013-04-05.

Coordinates: 39°01′48″N127°30′00″E / 39.03000°N 127.50000°E / 39.03000; 127.50000