Anchored Cross

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The anchored cross, or mariner's cross, is a stylized cross in the shape of an anchor. It is a symbol which is shaped like a plus sign with anchor-like protrusions at the end of each arm, hence the name. The symbol can be used to signify 'fresh start' or 'hope', as in The Bible, Hebrews 6.19: "Which hope we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and stedfast, and which entereth into that within the veil". [1]

Anchor Device used to connect a vessel to the bed of a body of water to prevent the craft from drifting

An anchor is a device, normally made of metal, used to connect a vessel to the bed of a body of water to prevent the craft from drifting due to wind or current. The word derives from Latin ancora, which itself comes from the Greek ἄγκυρα (ankura).

The mariner's cross is also referred to as St. Clement's Cross in reference to the way he was martyred. [2]

Pope Clement I 4th Pope of the Catholic Church

Pope Clement I, also known as Saint Clement of Rome, is listed by Irenaeus and Tertullian as Bishop of Rome, holding office from 88 to his death in 99. He is considered to be the first Apostolic Father of the Church.

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References

  1. King James Bible Hebrews 6.19
  2. Stracke, Richard (2015-10-20). "Saint Clement: The Iconography". Christian Iconography.