Andrew Lesnie

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Andrew Lesnie

ACS, ASC
Andrew Lesnie.jpg
Born1 January 1956
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Died28 April 2015(2015-04-28) (aged 59)
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Occupation Cinematographer
Years active1978–2014
Awards Academy Award for Best Cinematography
The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)

Andrew Lesnie ACS ASC (1 January 1956 – 28 April 2015) was an Australian cinematographer. He was best known as the cinematographer for The Lord of the Rings trilogy (2001–2003) and its prequel The Hobbit trilogy (2012–2014), both directed by New Zealand director Peter Jackson. He received the Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work on The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring in 2002.

Contents

Early life and career

Lesnie was born in Sydney, New South Wales, on 1 January 1956, [1] the son of Shirley (Lithgow) and Allan Lesnie, who worked for the family's company, butcher suppliers Harry Lesnie Pty Ltd.

He was educated at Sydney Grammar School. Andrew was well liked and popular at school. Lesnie finished 6th form and his Higher School Certificate in 1974. [2] He started his career in 1978 as an assistant camera operator on the film Patrick (1978) while he was still in school at Australian Film, Television and Radio School (AFTRS). [3] sd

His first job after graduation in 1979 was as a cameraman on the Logie Award-winning Australian magazine-style afternoon TV show Simon Townsend's Wonder World . Simon Townsend gave Lesnie almost daily opportunities to develop his craft with little restriction over a wide variety of stories and situations, and to experiment with camera and lighting techniques in hundreds of locations and situations. After two years of working on the show, Lesnie moved on to numerous Australian film and television productions, including the mini-series Bodyline . [4]

Later, he worked as a second camera assistant on the film The Killing of Angel Street (1981). [3]

Lesnie would then go on to develop his craft as he photographed films such as Stations (1983), The Delinquents (1989), Temptation of the Monk (1993), and Spider and Rose (1994). [3]

Career

His work began receiving major attention after the release of the anthropomorphic pig story Babe (1995) and its sequel, Babe: Pig in the City . He was director of photography on Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings trilogy, and received an Oscar for his work on The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring in 2002. Since then, he filmed several other Jackson-directed films, including King Kong and The Lovely Bones , and also filmed The Hobbit films directed by Jackson.

The Lord of the Rings trilogy (2001–03)

Lesnie used motion picture camera company Arri's Arriflex 435, Arriflex 535, and ArriCam Studio 35mm film cameras for the trilogy. He used Carl Zeiss Ultra Prime Lenses and Kodak's 5279 (tungsten-balanced) film stock to photograph the films. [5]

Lesnie planned far ahead into the production with Peter Jackson with previsualisation programs to help establish frame sizes and angles, as well as construction of sets. [6] During filming, Lesnie emphasised earthly colours in the makeup and wardrobe of the cast and extras. [7]

At the acceptance speech for his Oscar win for Fellowship of the Ring, Lesnie dedicated his acceptance to chief lighting technician Brian Bansgrove, who he described as a major contributor to the quality of the film's cinematography. [8]

The Hobbit trilogy (2012–14)

For production, Lesnie used Red Digital Cinema's Epic cameras as well as Carl Zeiss Ultra Prime Lenses to photograph the film. Jackson and Lesnie decided to shoot the film in 3D with as many as 15 stereoscopic camera rigs (2 cameras each) with 3ality. [9] They also decided to shoot the film in an uncommon frame rate of 48 frames per second versus the industry standard of 24 frames per second. This would make Lesnie the first cinematographer to employ such a method that claims to induce more clarity, reduce motion blur, and make 3D easier to watch. [10] [11]

The Water Diviner

Lesnie's final film, The Water Diviner , directed by and starring Russell Crowe, was released in Australia in December 2014 and in America in November 2015, one week before his death.

Personal life

Lesnie lived on Sydney's north coast. He was a member of both the Australian Cinematographers Society and the American Society of Cinematographers. Lesnie died of a heart attack in his Sydney home on 28 April 2015. [12]

Filmography

YearFilmDirectorNotes
1986 Fair Game Mario Andreacchio
1987 Dark Age Arch Nicholson
1989 The Delinquents Chris Thomson
1991 The Girl Who Came Late Kathy Mueller
1993 Temptation of a Monk Clara LawWith Arthur Wong
Nominated- Hong Kong Film Award for Best Cinematography
1995 Babe Chris Noonan
1996 Two If by Sea Bill Bennett
1997 Doing Time for Patsy Cline Chris Kennedy AACTA Award for Best Cinematography
1998 Babe: Pig in the City George Miller
The Sugar Factory Robert Carter
2001 The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring Peter Jackson Academy Award for Best Cinematography
Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Cinematography
Dallas–Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Cinematography
Nominated- BAFTA Award for Best Cinematography
Nominated- American Society of Cinematographers Award for Outstanding Cinematography
Nominated- Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Cinematography
Nominated- Satellite Award for Best Cinematography
2002 The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Nominated- BAFTA Award for Best Cinematography
Nominated- Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Cinematography
Nominated- Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Cinematography
Nominated- Satellite Award for Best Cinematography
2003 The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King BAFTA Award for Best Cinematography
Dallas–Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Cinematography
Florida Film Critics Circle Award for Best Cinematography
Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Cinematography
Nominated- American Society of Cinematographers Award for Outstanding Cinematography
Nominated- Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Cinematography
Nominated- Satellite Award for Best Cinematography
2004 Love's Brother Jan Sardi Nominated- AACTA Award for Best Cinematography
2005 King Kong Peter JacksonNominated- American Society of Cinematographers Award for Outstanding Cinematography
Nominated- Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Cinematography
2007 I Am Legend Francis Lawrence
2009 The Lovely Bones Peter Jackson Dallas–Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Cinematography
Nominated- Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Cinematography
Nominated- Houston Film Critics Society Award for Best Cinematography
Bran Nue Dae Rachel Perkins
2010 The Last Airbender M. Night Shyamalan
2011 Rise of the Planet of the Apes Rupert Wyatt
2012 The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey Peter Jackson
2013 The Turning Simon Stone Segment "Reunion" [13]
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Peter Jackson
2014 Healing Craig Monahan
The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies Peter Jackson
The Water Diviner Russell Crowe

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References

  1. Sydney Morning Herald
  2. http://www.smh.com.au/comment/obituaries/acclaimed-cinematographer-andrew-lesnie-leaves-staggeringly-influential-oeuvre-20150717-giedjn.html
  3. 1 2 3 Moran, Albert and Vieth, Errol (2005).The A to Z of Australian and New Zealand Cinema Scarecrow Press, Inc.
  4. The Australian Film and Television Companion – compiled by Tony Harrison, Simon & Schuster, Australia (1994)
  5. "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring". shotonwhat.com. Archived from the original on 25 March 2014.
  6. Gray, Simon (December 2002). "A Fellowship in Peril (p.3)"
  7. Gray, Simon (December 2002). "A Fellowship in Peril (p.2)"
  8. "The contenders: Nominees for 16th annual ASC awards. (ASC Awards).(American Society of Cinematographers)". 15 February 2002. Archived from the original on 21 March 2017.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  9. "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey". shotonwhat.com.
  10. Egan, Jack (21 December 2012) "Contendor – Director of Photography Andrew Lesnie, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey"
  11. Kilday, Gregg (13 November 2013) "Despite 'The Hobbit,' Hollywood Isn't Adopting 48 Frames Per Second"
  12. "Cinematographer Andrew Lesnie has died from a heart attack". Herald Sun. 28 April 2015.
  13. "THE TURNING" (PDF). ABC Online . Retrieved 28 April 2015.