Anilingus

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Depiction of anilingus

Anilingus (from the Latin anus + -lingus, from lingere, "to lick", variantly spelled "analingus" [1] [2] ) is the oral and anal sex act in which a person stimulates the anus of another by using the mouth, including lips, tongue, or teeth. It is also called anal–oral contact and anal–oral sex, and is additionally known by slang names.

Contents

Health risks include fecal–oral transmission of diseases.

Etymology and alternative names

The term anilingus entered English through the 1899 F. J. Rebman translation of Edition 10 of sexologist Richard von Krafft-Ebing's 1886 book Psychopathia sexualis . [3] [4]

Colloquial names include "rimming", "rim job", "eating ass" or "tossing the salad".

Practice

General

Pleasure for the giver during anilingus is usually based more on the principle of the act. [5] [6] The anus has a relatively high concentration of nerve endings and can be an erogenous zone, and the recipient may receive pleasure from external anal stimulation. The person receiving anilingus is regarded as the passive partner in the act, and the person performing anilingus is the active partner. People may engage in anilingus for its own sake, before anal fingering or penetration, or as part of foreplay. Studies indicate that anilingus is a rare sexual practice between women. [7] [8]

Technique

Anilingus can involve a variety of techniques to stimulate the anus, including kissing or licking; it may also involve the tongue moving around the edge of the anus or up and down the insides of the cheeks of the buttocks, and in and out of the anus.

Anilingus can be performed in a number of sex positions including:

Health risks and prevention

Health risk

Anilingus has potential health risks arising from the oral contact with human feces. Diseases which may be transmitted by contact with feces include: bacterial diseases including shigellosis (bacillary dysentery); viral systemic diseases including hepatitis A, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, poliomyelitis, human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpes simplex virus; parasites including intestinal parasites; and infections and inflammations chlamydia infection, gastroenteritis, conjunctivitis, gonorrhea, lymphogranuloma venereum [12] and other sexually transmitted infections. [13]

Applying the mouth to the genitals immediately after applying it to the anus can introduce the bacterium Escherichia coli ("E. coli") into the urethra, leading to a urinary tract infection. HIV/AIDS is not believed to be easily transmitted through anilingus. [14]

Anilingus with a number of casual partners increases the health risks associated with the practice. Generally, people carrying infections that may be passed on during anilingus appear healthy. Parasites may be in the feces if undercooked meat was consumed. The feces contain traces of hepatitis A only if the infected person has eaten contaminated food.

Another recent study suggests a correlation between oral sex and throat cancer. It is believed that this is due to the transmission of HPV because this virus has been implicated in most cervical cancers. The study concludes that people who had one to five oral-sex partners in their lifetime had approximately a doubled risk of throat cancer compared with those who never engaged in this activity. Those with more than five oral-sex partners had a 250% increased risk compared with those who never engaged in this activity. [15]

Prevention

Safe sex practices may include thorough washing of the anal region before anilingus to wash away most external fecal particles and reduce the risk of contraction of fecal-sourced infection. An enema can also reduce the risk of direct fecal contact. [16] A dental dam may also be used, and another safe sex practice is to avoid unprotected sex which involves fellatio after anal intercourse.

If the receiving partner has wounds or open sores on the genitals, or if the giving partner has wounds or open sores on or in the mouth, or bleeding gums, this poses an increased risk of sexually transmitted infections. Brushing the teeth, flossing, undergoing dental work, and eating crunchy foods (such as potato chips) relatively soon before or after performing anilingus also increases the risk of transmission, because all of these activities can cause small scratches on the inside of the lips, cheeks, and palate. These wounds, even when they are microscopic, increase the chances of contracting sexually transmitted infections that can be transmitted orally under these conditions.

As punishment

Forced and mostly public anilingus was used as a form of humiliation and punishment, usually of prisoners. The use of the practice in the Thirty Years' War was described by Grimmelshausen in Simplicius Simplicissimus (1668). [17] The practice is commonly referred to as "arse licking", and the term is still at times applied to the behaviour of someone who is overly respectful or helpful to someone in authority. [18]

In the United States prison system, anilingus is one of the ways one prisoner pays his dues to another inmate. In prison slang, this activity is known as "tossing a salad". [19] [20]

See also

Related Research Articles

Anal sex Insertion of the penis into the anus, or other sexual activity involving the anus

Anal sex or anal intercourse is generally the insertion and thrusting of the erect penis into a person's anus, or anus and rectum, for sexual pleasure. Other forms of anal sex include fingering, the use of sex toys for anal penetration, oral sex performed on the anus (anilingus), and pegging. Although anal sex most commonly means penile–anal penetration, sources sometimes use anal intercourse to exclusively denote penile–anal penetration, and anal sex to denote any form of anal sexual activity, especially between pairings as opposed to anal masturbation.

Fellatio Oral sex on the penis by a sexual partner

Fellatio is an oral sex act involving a person stimulating the penis of another person by using the mouth, throat, or both. Oral stimulation of the scrotum may also be termed fellatio, or colloquially as teabagging. If fellatio is performed on oneself, the act is called autofellatio.

Safe sex Ways to reduce the risk of acquiring STDs

Safe sex is sexual activity using methods or devices to reduce the risk of transmitting or acquiring sexually transmitted infections (STIs), especially HIV. "Safe sex" is also sometimes referred to as safer sex or protected sex to indicate that some safe sex practices do not completely eliminate STI risks. It is also sometimes used colloquially to describe methods aimed at preventing pregnancy that may or may not also lower STI risks.

A sex position is a position of the body that people use for sexual intercourse or other sexual activities. Sexual acts are generally described by the positions the participants adopt in order to perform those acts. Though sexual intercourse generally involves penetration of the body of one person by another, sex positions commonly involve penetrative or non-penetrative sexual activities.

Doggy style Sex position

Doggy style is a sex position in which a person bends over, crouches on all fours, or lies on their abdomen, for sexual intercourse, other forms of sexual penetration or other sexual activity. Doggy style is a form of a rear-entry position, others being with the receiving partner lying on the side in the spoons sex position or the reverse cowgirl sex position. Non-penetrative sex in this position may also be regarded as doggy style.

Fecal–oral route Disease transmission via pathogens from fecal particles

The fecal–oral route describes a particular route of transmission of a disease wherein pathogens in fecal particles pass from one person to the mouth of another person. Main causes of fecal–oral disease transmission include lack of adequate sanitation, and poor hygiene practices. If soil or water bodies are polluted with fecal material, humans can be infected with waterborne diseases or soil-transmitted diseases. Fecal contamination of food is another form of fecal-oral transmission. Washing hands properly after changing a baby's diaper or after performing anal hygiene can prevent foodborne illness from spreading.

Frot Penis-to-penis sexual contact

Frot is a non-penetrative form of male-to-male sexual activity that usually involves direct penis-to-penis contact. The term was popularized by gay male activists who disparaged the practice of anal sex, but has since evolved to encompass a variety of preferences for the act, which may or may not imply particular attitudes towards other sexual activities. Owing to its non-penetrative character, frot has the safe sex advantage of minimizing the transmission risk for HIV/AIDS; however, it still carries the risk of skin-to-skin sexually transmitted infections, such as HPV and pubic lice (crabs), both of which can be transmitted even when lesions are not visible.

Men who have sex with men (MSM), also known as males who have sex with males, are male persons who engage in sexual activity with members of the same sex, regardless of how they identify themselves. They may identify as gay, homosexual, bisexual, pansexual, or heterosexual; or dispense with sexual identification altogether.

Anal cancer

Anal cancer is a cancer which arises from the anus, the distal opening of the gastrointestinal tract. Symptoms may include bleeding from the anus or a lump near the anus. Other symptoms may include pain, itchiness, or discharge from the anus. A change in bowel movements may also occur.

Transmission (medicine) Passing of a pathogen from one organism to another

In medicine, public health, and biology, transmission is the passing of a pathogen causing communicable disease from an infected host individual or group to a particular individual or group, regardless of whether the other individual was previously infected.

Anal masturbation

Anal masturbation is an erotic stimulation focusing on the anus and rectum. For humans, common methods of anal masturbation include manual stimulation of the anal opening, and the insertion of an object or objects such as fingers, tongue, phallic-shaped items, water play, or sex toys such as anal beads, butt plugs, dildos, vibrators, or specially designed prostate massagers.

Oral sex Sexual activity involving the stimulation of the genitalia by the use of the mouth

Oral sex, sometimes referred to as oral intercourse, is sexual activity involving the stimulation of the genitalia of a person by another person using the mouth and the throat. Cunnilingus is oral sex performed on the vulva or vagina, while fellatio is oral sex performed on the penis. Anilingus, another form of oral sex, is oral stimulation of the anus. Oral stimulation of other parts of the body, such as by kissing or licking, is not considered oral sex.

Genital herpes Infection by herpes simplex viruses of the genitals

Genital herpes is an infection by the herpes simplex virus (HSV) of the genitals. Most people either have no or mild symptoms and thus do not know they are infected. When symptoms do occur, they typically include small blisters that break open to form painful ulcers. Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, aching, or swollen lymph nodes, may also occur. Onset is typically around 4 days after exposure with symptoms lasting up to 4 weeks. Once infected further outbreaks may occur but are generally milder.

Ass to mouth is a slang term associated with the porn industry describing anal sex immediately followed by oral sex. The term is primarily used to describe a sexual practice whereby an erect penis is removed from a receptive partner's anus and then directly put into their mouth, or possibly the mouth of another.

Non-penetrative sex Sexual activity that usually does not include sexual penetration

Non-penetrative sex or outercourse is sexual activity that usually does not include sexual penetration. It generally excludes the penetrative aspects of vaginal, anal, or oral sexual activity, but includes various forms of sexual and non-sexual activity, such as frottage, mutual masturbation, kissing, or cuddling. Some forms of non-penetrative sex, particularly when termed outercourse, include penetrative aspects, such as penetration that may result from forms of fingering or oral sex.

Lesbian sexual practices Sexual practices between women

Lesbian sexual practices are sexual activities involving women who have sex with women, regardless of their sexual orientation. A woman who has sex with another woman may identify as a lesbian if she is sexually attracted to women, or bisexual if she is not exclusively sexually attracted to women, or dispense with sexual identification altogether. The term may also be applied to a heterosexual or asexual woman who is unsure of or is exploring her sexuality.

Sexually transmitted infection Infection transmitted through human sexual behavior

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs), also referred to as sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), are infections that are commonly spread by sexual activity, especially vaginal intercourse, anal sex and oral sex. STIs often do not initially cause symptoms, which results in a greater risk of passing the disease on to others. Symptoms and signs of STIs may include vaginal discharge, penile discharge, ulcers on or around the genitals, and pelvic pain. STIs can be transmitted to an infant before or during childbirth, which may result in poor outcomes for the infant. Some STIs can cause infertility.

Human anus

In humans, the anus is the external opening of the rectum. Two sphincters control the exit of feces from the body during an act of defecation, which is the primary function of the anus. These are the internal anal sphincter and the external anal sphincter, which are circular muscles that normally maintain constriction of the orifice and which relaxes as required by normal physiological functioning. The inner sphincter is involuntary and the outer is voluntary. It is located behind the perineum which is located behind the vagina or scrotum.

Cunnilingus Oral sex on the vulva or vagina by a sexual partner

Cunnilingus is an oral sex act performed by a person on the vulva or vagina of another person. The clitoris is the most sexually sensitive part of the human female genitalia, and its stimulation may result in a woman becoming sexually aroused or achieving orgasm.

Gay sexual practices Sexual practices between men

Gay sexual practices are sexual activities involving men who have sex with men (MSM), regardless of their sexual orientation or sexual identity. Evidence shows that sex between men is significantly underreported in surveys due to social desirability bias.

References

  1. Jordan Tate (2007). The Contemporary Dictionary of Sexual Euphemisms. DSt. Martin's Press. pp.  8–9, 106. ISBN   0-312-36298-6.
  2. Jack Morin (2000). Anal Pleasure & Health: A Guide for Men and Women. Down There Press. p. 147. ISBN   0-940208-20-2.
  3. Mark Forsyth. The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll through the Hidden Connections of the English Language. Icon Books, 2011, p. 49.
  4. "anilingus". Oxford English Dictionary (3rd ed.). Oxford University Press. September 2005. Retrieved 16 July 2018. (Subscription or participating institution membership required.)
  5. Newman, Felice (2004). The Whole Lesbian Sex Book: A Passionate Guide for All of Us. Cleis Press Inc. p. 174. ISBN   978-1-57344-199-5.
  6. Taormino, Tristan (2006). The Ultimate Guide to Anal Sex for Women. Cleis Press Inc. p. 92. ISBN   978-1-57344-221-3.
  7. Jonathan Zenilman; Mohsen Shahmanesh (2011). Sexually Transmitted Infections: Diagnosis, Management, and Treatment. Jones & Bartlett Publishers. pp. 329–330. ISBN   0495812943 . Retrieved 14 May 2014.
  8. Diamant AL, Lever J, Schuster M (June 2000). "Lesbians' Sexual Activities and Efforts to Reduce Risks for Sexually Transmitted Diseases". J Gay Lesbian Med Assoc. 4 (2): 41–8. doi:10.1023/A:1009513623365.
  9. Adam Cowell. "Rimming - GayLifeUK". gaylifeuk.com. Archived from the original on 29 May 2014. Retrieved 10 December 2012.
  10. Morin, J. (1998). Anal pleasure and Health. Oakland, CA: Down there press.
  11. Tate, Jordan. (9 January 2007) The Contemporary Dictionary of Sexual Euphemisms. Publisher St. Martin's Press ISBN   0-312-36298-6
  12. LGBT Foundation. "Lymphogranuloma Venereum - LGBT Foundation". lgbt.foundation. Archived from the original on 26 June 2015. Retrieved 25 June 2015.
  13. "Is Oral Sex Safe?". University Health Center at the University of Georgia. Archived from the original on 10 October 2007. Retrieved 12 October 2007.Cite journal requires |journal= (help) (from internet archive)
  14. "What's Rimming?". Columbia University's internet health service. Archived from the original on 14 July 2016. Retrieved 12 October 2007.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  15. Roxanne Khamsi (9 May 2007). "Oral sex can cause throat cancer". NewScientist.com news service. Archived from the original on 30 September 2007. Retrieved 12 October 2007.
  16. Castleman, Michael (27 April 2010). "Rimming: The curious couple's guide to oral-anal play". Psychology Today. Retrieved 23 November 2012.
  17. Simplicissimus, The German Adventurer, trans. John C. Osborne, Newfound Press, 2008. ISBN   978-0-9797292-5-6
  18. "arse-licking definition and synonyms - Macmillan Dictionary". macmillandictionary.com.
  19. Byrne, J.; Hummer, D. (2007). "In search of the "Tossed Salad Man" (and others involved in prison violence): New strategies for predicting and controlling violence in prison". Aggression and Violent Behavior. 12 (5): 531. doi:10.1016/j.avb.2007.02.001.
  20. Marc Levin for HBO (1996). Prisoners of the War on Drugs (Documentary). IMDb . Retrieved 31 August 2013.