Anjō

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Anjō

安城市
Den park2.jpg
Mikawaanjo Skyline01.jpg
Upper stage: Den Park
Lower stage: Skyline of Mikawaanjō
Flag of Anjo, Aichi.svg
Flag
Emblem of Anjo, Aichi.svg
Seal
Anjo in Aichi Prefecture Ja.svg
Location of Anjō within Aichi Prefecture
Japan location map with side map of the Ryukyu Islands.svg
Red pog.svg
Anjō
 
Coordinates: 34°57′31.4″N137°4′49.2″E / 34.958722°N 137.080333°E / 34.958722; 137.080333 Coordinates: 34°57′31.4″N137°4′49.2″E / 34.958722°N 137.080333°E / 34.958722; 137.080333
Country Japan
Region Chūbu (Tōkai)
Prefecture Aichi
Government
  MayorGaku Kamiya
Area
  Total86.05 km2 (33.22 sq mi)
Elevation
10 m (30 ft)
Population
 (October 1, 2019)
  Total188,693
  Density2,200/km2 (5,700/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+9 (Japan Standard Time)
- Tree Japanese Black Pine
- Flower Scarlet Sage
Phone number0566-76-1111
Address18-23 Sakuramachi, Anjō-shi, Aichi-ken 446-8501
Website Official website
DownTown of Anjo Miyukihonmachi, Anjo, Aichi Prefecture 446-0032, Japan - panoramio (2).jpg
DownTown of Anjō
Meiji Irrigation canal Meiji Irrigation canal.jpg
Meiji Irrigation canal

Anjō (安城市, Anjō-shi) is a city in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. As of 1 October 2019, the city had an estimated population of 188,693 in 76,087 households, [1] and a population density of 2,193 persons per km². The total area of the city was 86.05 square kilometres (33.22 sq mi).

Contents

Geography

Anjō is situated in southern Aichi Prefecture, approximately 30 kilometres (19 mi) from central Nagoya, in the center of the Okazaki Plain, on the west bank of the Yahagi River. National Route 1 and National Route 23 provide the main east-west access through the city, with Aichi Prefectural Route 48 running between the two.

Neighboring municipalities

Aichi Prefecture

Demographics

Per Japanese census data, [2] the population of Anjō has grown rapidly over the past 70 years.

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1940 46,737    
1950 61,037+30.6%
1960 66,793+9.4%
1970 94,307+41.2%
1980 123,843+31.3%
1990 142,251+14.9%
2000 158,824+11.7%
2010 178,738+12.5%

Climate

The city has a climate characterized by hot and humid summers, and relatively mild winters (Köppen climate classification Cfa). The average annual temperature in Anjō is 15.6 °C. The average annual rainfall is 1576 mm with September as the wettest month. The temperatures are highest on average in August, at around 27.7 °C, and lowest in January, at around 4.4 °C. [3]

History

The area of present-day Anjō has been continuously occupied since preshistoric times. Archaeologists have found numerous remains from the Japanese Paleolithic period and burial mounds from the Kofun period. During the Nara period, the area was assigned to ancient Hekikai County, and was divided into several shōen during the Heian period, largely under the control of the Fujiwara clan or the Taira clan. However, in the Kamakura period, parts of the territory came under the control of the Jōdo Shinshū sect, who challenged the secular authority of the various samurai clans, most notably the Matsudaira clan. During the Sengoku period, numerous fortifications were erected in the area. Tokugawa Ieyasu unified the region and destroyed the power of the Jōdo Shinshū sect in the Battle of Azukizaka (1564). During the Edo period, half of present-day Anjō was controlled by Okazaki Domain and the other half by Kariya Domain under the Tokugawa shogunate with some scattered portions of tenryō territory ruled directly by the shogunate. During this period, the area was noted for its production of cotton and textiles.

At the start of the Meiji period, on October 1, 1889, Anjō was one of a collection of villages organized within Hekikai District, Aichi Prefecture by the establishment of the modern municipalities system,. It was elevated to town status on May 1, 1906. The opening of the Meiji Irrigation Canal transformed the area in the 1920s and 1930s into one of the most agriculturally productive regions of the period, sparking the comparison with Denmark, then regarded the most highly advanced agricultural nation in the world. [4] This led to Anjō's moniker of "Japan's Denmark" (日本デンマーク), which remains in the form of Den Park, a Danish theme park, as well as Den Beer, a microbrew available in the park.

Anjō was elevated to city status on May 3, 1952. On April 1, 1967, it annexed the neighboring town of Sakurai.

Government

Anjo City Hall Anjo City Hall in 2018ac.jpg
Anjo City Hall

Anjō has a mayor-council form of government with a directly elected mayor and a unicameral city legislature of 28 members. The city contributes two members to the Aichi Prefectural Assembly. In terms of national politics, the city is part of Aichi District 13 of the lower house of the Diet of Japan.

Economy

Anjō is a regional commercial center with a mixed economy of manufacturing and agriculture. In addition to rice, wheat, and soybeans, notable agricultural products include figs, Japanese pears, and cucumbers. Due to its proximity to the various factories of Toyota in neighboring Toyota City, Anjō is host to many factories supplying components into the automobile industry.

Companies headquartered in Anjō

Education

Schools

Primary and secondary education

International schools

Professional development school

Transportation

Railway

The Tōkaidō Shinkansen stops at Mikawa-Anjō Station, but Anjō Station on the Tōkaidō Main Line and Shin-Anjō Station on the Meitetsu Nagoya Main Line and Nishio Line serve the commercial center of the city.

JR logo (central).svg Central Japan Railway Company - Tōkaidō Shinkansen
JR logo (central).svg Central Japan Railway Company - Tōkaidō Main Line
Meitetsu logomark 2.svg MeitetsuNagoya Main Line
Meitetsu logomark 2.svg MeitetsuNishio Line

Highways

Sister cities

Local attractions

Tourist attraction

National Historic Sites
Other historical sites
Parks

Festival

Notable people

Related Research Articles

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Mikawa-Anjō Station Railway station in Anjō, Aichi Prefecture, Japan

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Meitetsu Nishio Line

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Yahagi River

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Horiuchikōen Station Railway station in Anjō, Aichi Prefecture, Japan

Horiuchikōen Station is a railway station in the city of Anjō, Aichi, Japan, operated by Meitetsu.

Sakurai Station (Aichi) Railway station in Anjō, Aichi Prefecture, Japan

Sakurai Station is a railway station in the city of Anjō, Aichi, Japan, operated by Meitetsu.

Futago Kofun

The Futago Kofun is a Kofun period burial mound, located in the Sakurai neighborhood of the city of Anjō, Aichi in the Tōkai region of Japan. The tumulus was designated a National Historic Site of Japan in 1927, and its borders were expanded in 1955.

Himeogawa Kofun

The Himeogawa Kofun (姫小川古墳) is a Kofun period burial mound located in the Himeogawa neighborhood of the city of Anjō, Aichi in the Tōkai region of Japan. The tumulus was designated as a National Historic Site in 1927.

References

  1. Anjō City official statistics (in Japanese)
  2. Anjō population statistics
  3. Anjō climate data
  4. "Aichi Voice - The Denmark of Japan?"
  5. "Escolas Brasileiras Homologadas no Japão" (Archive). Embassy of Brazil in Tokyo. Retrieved on October 13, 2015. "Endereço: 1-3-4 Sasame-cho, Anjo-shi, Aichi-ken 446-0073"
  6. 1 2 "International Exchange". List of Affiliation Partners within Prefectures. Council of Local Authorities for International Relations (CLAIR). Archived from the original on December 24, 2015. Retrieved November 21, 2015.