Anne Perry

Last updated

Anne Perry
Paris - Salon du livre 2012 - Anne Perry - 012.jpg
Perry in 2012
Born
Juliet Marion Hulme

(1938-10-28) 28 October 1938 (age 82)
Occupation Author
Website anneperry.us

Anne Perry (born Juliet Marion Hulme; 28 October 1938) is an English author of historical detective fiction, best known for her Thomas Pitt and William Monk series. In 1954, at the age of fifteen, she was convicted in the murder of her friend's mother, Honora Rieper. She changed her name after serving a five-year sentence for Rieper's murder.

Contents

Early life

Born in Blackheath, London, the daughter of physicist Dr. Henry Rainsford Hulme, Perry was diagnosed with tuberculosis as a child and sent to the Caribbean and South Africa in hopes that a warmer climate would improve her health. A 1948 Auckland Star photograph of Juliet arriving in New Zealand was discovered by Auckland Libraries staff and written about in the Heritage et AL blog. [1] She rejoined her family when she was 13 after her father took a position as Rector of Canterbury University College in New Zealand. She attended Christchurch Girls' High School, located in what became the Cranmer Centre. [2]

Murder and trial

In June 1954, at the age of 15, Hulme and her best friend Pauline Parker murdered Parker's mother, Honorah Rieper. [3] Hulme's parents were in the process of separating and she was supposed to go to South Africa to stay with a relative. The two teenage friends, who had created a complicated fantasy life together populated with famous actors such as James Mason and Orson Welles, did not want to be separated.

On 22 June 1954, the girls and Honorah Rieper went for a walk in Victoria Park in their hometown of Christchurch. On an isolated path Hulme dropped an ornamental stone so that Rieper would lean over to retrieve it. Parker had planned to hit her mother with half a brick wrapped in a stocking. The girls presumed that one blow would kill her but it took more than 20. [4]

Parker and Hulme stood trial in Christchurch in 1954 and were found guilty on 29 August that year. As they were too young to be considered for the death penalty under New Zealand law at the time, they were convicted and sentenced to be "detained at Her Majesty's pleasure". In practice they were detained at the discretion of the Minister of Justice. They were released separately five years later.

Parker and Hulme are not believed to have had any contact since the trial. [5]

The events formed the basis for the 1994 film Heavenly Creatures , in which Melanie Lynskey portrayed a teenage Pauline Parker and Kate Winslet the teenaged Juliet Hulme. At the time of the film's release, it was not generally known that mystery author "Anne Perry" was Juliet Hulme, whose identity was made public some months after the film's release. Although some presumed Hulme and Parker's relationship to be sexual, Perry stated in 2006 that, while the relationship was obsessive, the two "were never lesbians". [5]

Later life

After being released from prison in November 1959, Hulme returned to England and became a flight attendant. For a period she lived in the United States, where she joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1968. She later settled in the Scottish village of Portmahomack where she lived with her mother. Her father had a distinguished scientific career, heading the British hydrogen bomb programme. [6]

Hulme took the name Anne Perry, using her stepfather's surname. Her first novel, The Cater Street Hangman , was published under this name in 1979. Her works generally fall into one of several categories of genre fiction, including historical murder mysteries and detective fiction. Many feature recurring characters, most importantly Thomas Pitt, who appeared in her first novel, and amnesiac private investigator William Monk, who first appeared in her 1990 novel The Face of a Stranger. By 2003 she had published 47 novels, and several collections of short stories. Her story "Heroes", which first appeared in the 1999 anthology Murder and Obsession, edited by Otto Penzler, won the 2001 Edgar Award for Best Short Story.

In 2005, Perry appeared on the Trisha show to discuss the crime on a special themed show. [7] A 2009 documentary film, Anne Perry Interiors, gave a snapshot of her life and the people close to her. [8]

In 2017, Anne Perry left Scotland and moved to Hollywood in order to more effectively promote films based on her novels. [9]

Bibliography

Each series is listed in internal chronological order, according to the author's website. [10]

The two main series each feature a male and a female protagonist. Thomas Pitt is matched with Charlotte; her female society relatives help in the mysteries out of boredom. William Monk is matched with Hester Latterly, a Crimean War nurse. The Monk mysteries are set earlier in the Victorian era (1850s–1860s) than the Pitt books (1880s–1890s). Hester plays a very strong role in these stories; in some cases she is a better investigator than Monk. The Christmas stories involve minor characters such as sisters, bosses, or grandmothers in a personal crisis at a later Christmas time with a strongly enforced redemption message at the end.

Featuring Thomas Pitt

  1. The Cater Street Hangman (1979)
  2. Callander Square (1980)
  3. Paragon Walk (1981)
  4. Resurrection Row (1981)
  5. Rutland Place (1983)
  6. Bluegate Fields (1984)
  7. Death in the Devil's Acre (1985)
  8. Cardington Crescent (1987)
  9. Silence in Hanover Close (1988)
  10. Bethlehem Road (1990)
  11. Highgate Rise (1991)
  12. Belgrave Square (1992)
  13. Farrier's Lane (1993)
  14. The Hyde Park Headsman (1994)
  15. Traitors Gate (1995)
  16. Pentecost Alley (1996)
  17. Ashworth Hall (1997)
  18. Brunswick Gardens (1998)
  19. Bedford Square (1999)
  20. Half Moon Street (2000)
  21. The Whitechapel Conspiracy (2001)
  22. Southampton Row (2002)
  23. Seven Dials (2003)
  24. Long Spoon Lane (2005)
  25. Buckingham Palace Gardens (2008)
  26. Betrayal at Lisson Grove (US title: Treason at Lisson Grove) (2011)
  27. Dorchester Terrace (2012)
  28. Midnight at Marble Arch (2013)
  29. Death on Blackheath (2014)
  30. The Angel Court Affair (2015)
  31. Treachery at Lancaster Gate (2016)
  32. Murder on the Serpentine (2016)

Featuring Daniel Pitt

  1. Twenty-One Days (2018) [11]
  2. Triple Jeopardy (2019)
  3. One Fatal Flaw (2020)
  4. Death with a Double Edge (2021)

Featuring William Monk

  1. The Face of a Stranger (1990)
  2. A Dangerous Mourning (1991)
  3. Defend and Betray (1992)
  4. A Sudden, Fearful Death (1993)
  5. The Sins of the Wolf (1994)
  6. Cain His Brother (1995)
  7. Weighed in the Balance (1996)
  8. The Silent Cry (1997)
  9. A Breach of Promise (alt. title: Whited Sepulchres) (1997)
  10. The Twisted Root (1999)
  11. Slaves of Obsession (alt. title: Slaves and Obsession) (2000)
  12. A Funeral in Blue (2001)
  13. Death of a Stranger (2002)
  14. The Shifting Tide (2004)
  15. Dark Assassin (2006)
  16. Execution Dock (2009)
  17. Acceptable Loss (2011)
  18. A Sunless Sea (2012)
  19. Blind Justice (2013)
  20. Blood on the Water (2014)
  21. Corridors of the Night (2015)
  22. Revenge in a Cold River (2016)
  23. An Echo of Murder (2017)
  24. Dark Tide Rising (2018)

Featuring Elena Standish

  1. Death in Focus (2019)
  2. A Question of Betrayal (2020)
  3. A Darker Reality (2021)

The World War I series

  1. No Graves As Yet (2003)
  2. Shoulder the Sky (2004)
  3. Angels in the Gloom (2005)
  4. At Some Disputed Barricade (2006)
  5. We Shall Not Sleep (2007)

The Christmas stories

  1. A Christmas Journey (2003)
  2. A Christmas Visitor (2004)
  3. A Christmas Guest (2005)
  4. A Christmas Secret (2006)
  5. A Christmas Beginning (2007)
  6. A Christmas Grace (2008)
  7. A Christmas Promise (2009)
  8. A Christmas Odyssey (2010)
  9. A Christmas Homecoming (2011)
  10. A Christmas Garland (2012)
  11. A Christmas Hope (2013)
  12. A New York Christmas (2014)
  13. A Christmas Escape (2015)
  14. A Christmas Message (2016)
  15. A Christmas Return (2017)
  16. A Christmas Revelation (2018)
  17. A Christmas Gathering (2019)
  18. A Christmas Resolution (2020)
  19. A Christmas Legacy (2021)

The Christmas Collections

  1. An Anne Perry Christmas: Two Holiday Novels (2006) – contains A Christmas Journey (2003) and A Christmas Visitor (2004)
  2. Anne Perry's Christmas Mysteries: Two Holiday Novels (2008) – contains A Christmas Guest (2005) and A Christmas Secret (2006)
  3. Anne Perry's Silent Nights: Two Victorian Christmas Mysteries (2009) – contains A Christmas Beginning (2007) and A Christmas Grace (2008)
  4. Anne Perry's Christmas Vigil: Two Victorian Holiday Mysteries (2011) – contains A Christmas Promise (2009) and A Christmas Odyssey (2010)
  5. Anne Perry's Christmas Crimes: Two Victorian Holiday Mysteries (2014) – contains A Christmas Homecoming (2011) and A Christmas Garland (2012)
  6. Anne Perry's Merry Mysteries: Two Victorian Holiday Novels (2015) – contains A Christmas Hope (2013) and A New York Christmas (2014)

Fantasy

  1. Tathea (1999)
  2. Come Armageddon (2001)

Timepiece series (young adult novels)

  1. Tudor Rose (2011)
  2. Rose of No Man's Land (2011)
  3. Blood Red Rose (2012)
  4. Rose Between Two Thorns (2012)

Other books

Critical studies, reviews and biography

See also

Related Research Articles

Detective fiction Subgenre of crime fiction and mystery fiction

Detective fiction is a subgenre of crime fiction and mystery fiction in which an investigator or a detective—either professional, amateur or retired—investigates a crime, often murder. The detective genre began around the same time as speculative fiction and other genre fiction in the mid-nineteenth century and has remained extremely popular, particularly in novels. Some of the most famous heroes of detective fiction include C. Auguste Dupin, Sherlock Holmes, and Hercule Poirot. Juvenile stories featuring The Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, and The Boxcar Children have also remained in print for several decades.

Edith Pargeter

Edith Mary Pargeter, also known by her nom de plumeEllis Peters, was an English author of works in many categories, especially history and historical fiction, and was also honoured for her translations of Czech classics. She is probably best known for her murder mysteries, both historical and modern, and especially for her medieval detective series The Cadfael Chronicles.

Historical mystery

The historical mystery or historical whodunit is a subgenre of two literary genres, historical fiction and mystery fiction. These works are set in a time period considered historical from the author's perspective, and the central plot involves the solving of a mystery or crime. Though works combining these genres have existed since at least the early 20th century, many credit Ellis Peters's Cadfael Chronicles (1977–1994) for popularizing what would become known as the historical mystery. The increasing popularity and prevalence of this type of fiction in subsequent decades has spawned a distinct subgenre recognized by the publishing industry and libraries. Publishers Weekly noted in 2010 of the genre, "The past decade has seen an explosion in both quantity and quality. Never before have so many historical mysteries been published, by so many gifted writers, and covering such a wide range of times and places." Editor Keith Kahla concurs, "From a small group of writers with a very specialized audience, the historical mystery has become a critically acclaimed, award-winning genre with a toehold on the New York Times bestseller list."

Ngaio Marsh New Zealand crime writer and theatre director

Dame Edith Ngaio Marsh was a New Zealand crime writer and theatre director. She was appointed a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1966.

<i>Heavenly Creatures</i> 1994 New Zealand drama film directed by Peter Jackson

Heavenly Creatures is a 1994 New Zealand biographical psychological drama film directed by Peter Jackson, from a screenplay he co-wrote with his partner, Fran Walsh, and starring Kate Winslet and Melanie Lynskey in their feature film debuts, with supporting roles by Sarah Peirse, Diana Kent, Clive Merrison, and Simon O'Connor. Based on the notorious 1954 Parker–Hulme murder case in Christchurch, New Zealand, the film focuses on the relationship between two teenage girls—Pauline Parker and Juliet Hulme—which culminates in the murder of Parker's mother. The events of the film span the period from their meeting in 1952 to the murder in 1954.

The Parker–Hulme murder case began in the city of Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand, on 22 June 1954, when Honorah Rieper was killed by her teenage daughter, Pauline Parker, and Pauline's close friend, Juliet Hulme. Parker was 16 at the time, while Hulme was 15. The murder has inspired plays, novels, non-fiction books, and films including Peter Jackson's 1994 film Heavenly Creatures.

Ruth Rendell British writer

Ruth Barbara Rendell, Baroness Rendell of Babergh, was an English author of thrillers and psychological murder mysteries.

Kate Wilhelm American science fiction writer

Kate Wilhelm was an American author. She wrote novels and stories in the science fiction, mystery, and suspense genres, including the Hugo Award–winning Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang, and she established the Clarion Workshop with her husband Damon Knight and writer Robin Scott Wilson.

Keri Hulme is a New Zealand novelist, poet, and short-story writer. Her novel, The Bone People, won the Man Booker Prize in 1985. She was the first New Zealander to win this award. Hulme's writing explores themes of isolation, postcolonial and multicultural identity, and Maori, Celtic, and Norse mythology. She has also written under the pen name Kai Tainui.

Anthony Gilbert, the pen name of Lucy Beatrice Malleson, was an English crime writer who was a cousin of actor-screenwriter Miles Malleson. She also wrote fiction as Anne Meredith and the autobiography Three-a-Penny (1940) under the Meredith name.

Matricide Act of killing someones mother

Matricide is the act of killing one's own mother.

Susan Wittig Albert American writer

Susan Wittig Albert, also known by the pen names Robin Paige and Carolyn Keene, is an American mystery writer from Vermilion County, Illinois, United States.

Agatha Award

The Agatha Awards, named for Agatha Christie, are literary awards for mystery and crime writers who write in the traditional mystery subgenre: "books typified by the works of Agatha Christie. .. loosely defined as mysteries that contain no explicit sex, excessive gore or gratuitous violence, and are not classified as 'hard-boiled."At an annual convention in Washington, D.C., the Agatha Awards are handed out by Malice Domestic Ltd, in six categories: Best Novel; Best First Mystery; Best Historical Novel; Best Short Story; Best Non-Fiction; Best Children's/Young Adult Mystery. Additionally, in some years the Poirot Award is presented to honor individuals other than writers who have made outstanding contributions to the mystery genre, but it is not an annual award.

Thomas Pitt is the protagonist in a series of detective novels by Anne Perry.

Gwendoline Butler, née Williams was a British writer of mystery fiction and romance novels since 1956, she also used the pseudonym Jennie Melville. Credited for inventing the "woman's police procedural", is well known for her series of Inspector John Coffin novels as Gwendoline Butler, and by female detective Charmian Daniels as Jennie Melville.

Margaret Maron American crime fiction writer

Margaret Maron was an American writer, the author of award-winning mystery novels.

Donna Andrews (author)

Donna Andrews is an American mystery fiction writer of two award-winning amateur sleuth series. Her first book, Murder with Peacocks (1999), introduced Meg Langslow, a blacksmith from Yorktown, Virginia. It won the St. Martin's Minotaur Best First Traditional Mystery contest, the Agatha, Anthony, Barry, and Romantic Times Reviewers' Choice awards for best first novel, and the Lefty award for funniest mystery of 1999. The first novel in the Turing Hopper series debuted a highly unusual sleuth—an Artificial Intelligence (AI) personality who becomes sentient—and won the Agatha Award for best mystery that year.

<i>The Cater Street Hangman</i>

The Cater Street Hangman is a crime novel by Anne Perry. It is the first in a series which features the husband-and-wife team of Thomas and Charlotte Pitt.

Kathy Lynn Emerson is an American writer of historical and mystery novels and non-fiction. She also uses the pseudonyms Kaitlyn Dunnett and Kate Emerson.

Edith Maxwell (author) American writer

Edith Maxwell is an Agatha Award-winning American mystery author also currently writing as Maddie Day. She writes cozy, traditional, and historical mysteries set in the United States.

References

  1. Graves, Joanne (29 June 2012). "Juliet Hulme". heritageetal.blogspot.co.nz. Blogger . Retrieved 23 August 2015. Whilst scrolling through microfilms on a job for a customer, I came across an interesting photo in a 1948 copy of the Auckland Star.
  2. "Pauline Parker". Ministry for Culture and Heritage. 22 June 2010. Retrieved 20 May 2011.
  3. Honora used the surname Rieper although she was never legally married to Herbert Rieper.
  4. Gillies, Abby (14 November 2011). "The Parker-Hulme murder: Why it still matters to us". Nzherald.co.nz . Retrieved 5 February 2013.
  5. 1 2 "We were not lesbians, says former Juliet Hulme". The New Zealand Herald . 5 March 2006. Retrieved 21 May 2011.
  6. Tayler, R. J. (1991). "Henry Rainsford Hulme, 9 August 1908 – 8 January 1991". Quarterly Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society. 32 (3): 313. Bibcode:1991QJRAS..32..313T.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  7. "Film & TV Database". Archived from the original on 21 October 2013. Retrieved 25 March 2009.
  8. IMDb
  9. "Kiwi killer Anne Perry leaves Scotland hideaway for Hollywood". The New Zealand Herald . 5 June 2017. Archived from the original on 7 July 2017.
  10. "Pitt". anneperry.net. Archived from the original on 17 January 2013. Retrieved 5 February 2013.
  11. Perry, Anne. "Pitt Series". AnnePerry.co.uk. Archived from the original on 17 May 2019. Retrieved 11 December 2019.
  12. O'Callaghan, Jody (27 July 2012). "'Barbaric' prison inspiration for murderer turned writer". The Press . Christchurch. p. A5. Retrieved 27 July 2012.