Anthony Chez

Last updated
Anthony Chez
AWChez.png
Chez pictured in The Monticola, West Virginia yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1872-01-12)January 12, 1872
Richmond, Iowa
DiedDecember 30, 1937(1937-12-30) (aged 65)
Harrison, Ohio
Alma mater Oberlin (1900)
Playing career
Football
1897–1898 Oberlin
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1900 Wabash
1901 DePauw
1902–1903 Cincinnati
1904 West Virginia
Basketball
1902–1904 Cincinnati
1904–1907 West Virginia
Baseball
1901 Wabash
1902–1904 Cincinnati
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1904–1913 West Virginia
Head coaching record
Overall24–20–2 (football)
23–30 (basketball)
20–16–2 (baseball)

Anthony Wencel Chez (January 12, 1872 – December 30, 1937) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Wabash College (1900), DePauw University (1901), the University of Cincinnati (1902–1903), and West Virginia University (1904), compiling a career college football record of 24–20–2. Chez was also the head basketball coach at Cincinnati (1902–1904) and West Virginia (1904–1907), amassing a career college basketball record of 23–30. In addition, he was the head baseball coach at Wabash in 1901 and Cincinnati from 1902 to 1904, tallying a career college baseball mark of 20–16–2. From 1904 to 1913 Chez served as West Virginia's athletic director.

Contents

Coaching career

Chez was the 13th head football coach at the Wabash College located in Crawfordsville, Indiana and he held that position for the 1900 season. His record at Wabash was 5–4. In 1901, he became head football coach at rival DePauw University, where he led the Tigers to an 8–3 season, including two big wins (32–2, 35–5) over his former employer to the north, Wabash. From 1902 to 1903, he served as the head football coach at the University of Cincinnati, where he compiled a 5–10–2 record. In 1904, he was the head football coach at West Virginia University, where he compiled a 6–3 record.

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Wabash (Independent)(1900)
1900 Wabash5–4
Wabash:5–4
DePauw Tigers (Independent)(1901)
1901 DePauw8–3
DePauw:8–3
Cincinnati Bearcats (Independent)(1902–1903)
1902 Cincinnati 4–2–2
1903 Cincinnati 1–8
Cincinnati:5–10–2
West Virginia Mountaineers (Independent)(1904)
1904 West Virginia 6–3
West Virginia:6–3
Total:24–20–2

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