Anthony Cottrell (rugby union)

Last updated

Anthony Cottrell
CBE
Anthony Ian Cottrell.jpg
Birth name Anthony Ian Cottrell
Date of birth(1907-02-10)10 February 1907
Place of birth Westport, New Zealand
Date of death 10 December 1988(1988-12-10) (aged 81)
Place of death Christchurch, New Zealand
Height 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Weight 80 kg (180 lb)
School Christ's College
Occupation(s) Barrister and solicitor
Rugby union career
Position(s) Hooker and prop
All Black No. 362
Provincial / State sides
YearsTeamApps(Points)
1928–34 Canterbury 39 ()
National team(s)
YearsTeamApps(Points)
1929–32 New Zealand 11 (0)

Anthony Ian "Beau" Cottrell CBE (10 February 1907 – 10 December 1988) was a New Zealand rugby union player. A hooker and prop, Cottrell represented Canterbury at a provincial level, and was a member of the New Zealand national side, the All Blacks, from 1929 to 1932. He played 22 matches for the All Blacks including 11 internationals. [1] He went on to serve as a member of the management committee of the Canterbury Rugby Union. [2]

Rugby union Team sport, code of rugby football

Rugby union, commonly known in most of the world simply as rugby, is a contact team sport which originated in England in the first half of the 19th century. One of the two codes of rugby football, it is based on running with the ball in hand. In its most common form, a game is between two teams of 15 players using an oval-shaped ball on a rectangular field with H-shaped goalposts at each end.

Canterbury Rugby Football Union

The Canterbury Rugby Football Union is the governing body for rugby union in a portion of the Canterbury Region of New Zealand. Its colours are red and black in a hooped design. The CRFU govern the running of the Canterbury representative team which have won New Zealand's first-tier domestic competition National Provincial Championship 14 times including a "six-peat" from 2008 to 2013 – with five in the National Provincial Championship, two in the Air New Zealand Cup, five in the ITM Cup and one in the Mitre 10 Cup. Their most recent victory was the 2017 Mitre 10 Cup. Canterbury also acts as a primary feeder to the Crusaders, who play in the Super Rugby competition.

During World War II, Cottrell served as an officer with the New Zealand 20th Battalion. He was taken prisoner-of-war during the First Battle of El Alamein in July 1942, when he was wounded going to the assistance of a wounded man in his platoon. [3]

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

20th Battalion (New Zealand)

The 20th Battalion was an infantry battalion of the New Zealand Military Forces, which served during the Second World War as part of the 2nd New Zealand Division. During the war it was converted to an armoured regiment.

First Battle of El Alamein battle of the Western Desert Campaign of the Second World War

The First Battle of El Alamein was a battle of the Western Desert Campaign of the Second World War, fought in Egypt between Axis forces of the Panzer Army Africa and Allied forces of the Eighth Army.

He was later an active Rotarian, and served as a district governor. In the 1968 New Year Honours he was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire for services to the community. [4]

Rotary International international service organization

Rotary International is an international service organization whose stated purpose is to bring together business and professional leaders in order to provide humanitarian service and to advance goodwill and peace around the world. It is a non-political and non-sectarian organization open to all people regardless of race, color, creed, religion, gender, or political preference. There are 34,282 member clubs worldwide, and 1.2 million individuals, known as Rotarians, have joined.

The New Year Honours 1968 were appointments in many of the Commonwealth realms of Queen Elizabeth II to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries. They were announced in supplements to the London Gazette of 29 December 1967 to celebrate the year passed and mark the beginning of 1968.

Order of the British Empire order of chivalry of British constitutional monarchy

The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the civil service. It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female. There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of, the order.

Related Research Articles

New Zealand national rugby union team mens rugby union team of New Zealand

The New Zealand national rugby union team, called the All Blacks, represents New Zealand in men's rugby union, which is known as the country's national sport. The team has won the last two Rugby World Cups, in 2011 and 2015 as well as the inaugural tournament in 1987.

Bob Stuart New Zealand rugby union player

Robert Charles "Bob" Stuart was a New Zealand rugby union player and administrator. He was given a lifetime service award by the International Rugby Board immediately after the 2003 Rugby World Cup.

Dave Gallaher New Zealand Rugby union footballer. Captained New Zealand All Blacks in their 1905 Northern Hemisphere tour.

David Gallaher was an Irish-born New Zealand rugby union footballer best remembered as the captain of the "Original All Blacks"—the 1905–06 New Zealand national team, the first representative New Zealand side to tour the British Isles. Under Gallaher's leadership the Originals won 34 out of 35 matches over the course of tour, including legs in France and North America; the New Zealanders scored 976 points and conceded only 59. Before returning home he co-wrote the classic rugby text The Complete Rugby Footballer with his vice-captain Billy Stead. Gallaher retired as a player after the 1905–06 tour and took up coaching and selecting; he was a selector for both Auckland and New Zealand for most of the following decade.

Scott Robertson is a New Zealand rugby union coach, former player and professional breakdancer. He grew up in Tauranga and attended Mount Maunganui College in the Bay of Plenty. His position as a player was flanker and he played for Bay of Plenty, Perpignan, Canterbury, the Crusaders and the All Blacks. He was the head coach of the New Zealand U20 rugby union team and the Canterbury ITM Cup Team. In 2016, New Zealand Rugby and the Crusaders announced his appointment as the new Crusaders' head coach from 2017 to 2019, taking over from Todd Blackadder.

Kel Tremain New Zealand rugby union player

Kelvin Robin "Kel" Tremain was a New Zealand rugby union player and administrator. A flanker, he won 38 full caps for the New Zealand national team, the All Blacks, between 1959 and 1968, scoring nine tries. During the 1960s he had a status in New Zealand rugby comparable to that of his teammate, Colin Meads.

Joseph Aloysius Lavery was a New Zealand rugby footballer who was part of the professional 1907-1908 New Zealand rugby tour of Great Britain.

William Ernest Smith was a New Zealand rugby union player. He was educated at Nelson College where he was a member of the 1st XV in 1897. A first five-eighth, Smith represented Nelson at a provincial level, and played only one match for the national side, the All Blacks, in 1905, an international against Australia in Dunedin.

Everard Stanley Jackson was a New Zealand rugby union player. A prop, Jackson represented East Coast, Hawke's Bay and Wellington at a provincial level, and was a member of the New Zealand national side, the All Blacks, from 1938 to 1938. He played 11 matches for the All Blacks including six internationals. He played for New Zealand Māori in 1936.

Wayne Cottrell New Zealand rugby union player

Wayne David Cottrell was a New Zealand rugby union player. A first or second five-eighth, Cottrell represented Canterbury at a provincial level, and was a member of the New Zealand national side, the All Blacks, from 1967 to 1971. He played 37 matches for the All Blacks including nine internationals.

Nehe Rihara Milner-Skudder is a New Zealand rugby union player who currently plays as a utility back for the Hurricanes in Super Rugby and Manawatu in the Mitre 10 Cup.

Mervyn Miles Nelson Corner was a New Zealand rugby union player, sporting administrator, and bank executive.

Patrick Rhind New Zealand rugby union player and coach

Patrick Keith Rhind was a New Zealand rugby union player and coach. A prop, Rhind represented Canterbury and, briefly, Wellington at a provincial level, and was a member of the New Zealand national side, the All Blacks, in 1946. He played two matches for the All Blacks, both of them test matches against the touring Australian team. Together with another former All Black, Pat Vincent, Rhind was selector-coach of the Canterbury team from 1960 to 1962.

George Arthur Hardy Bullock-Douglas was a New Zealand rugby union player. A wing three-quarter, Bullock-Douglas represented Wanganui at a provincial level, and was a member of the New Zealand national side, the All Blacks, from 1932 to 1934. He played 15 matches for the All Blacks including five internationals.

Jock McKenzie (rugby union) New Zealander rugby union player (1892-1968)

Richard John McKenzie, known as Jock, was a rugby union footballer who played for the New Zealand national team, commonly called the All Blacks. He mostly played at second five-eighth, and made 20 appearances for New Zealand between 1913 and 1914. He played most of his provincial rugby for Wellington, but played two matches for Auckland in 1914 before the outbreak of the First World War. Most New Zealand rugby, including international matches, were suspended for the duration of the war. McKenzie was wounded during the war, and this forced him to retire from playing.

Thomas Clarence Morrison was a New Zealand rugby union player and administrator. A wing three-quarter, Morrison represented South Canterbury and Wellington at a provincial level. He was a member of the New Zealand national side, the All Blacks, on their 1938 tour of Australia, playing in five matches including three internationals. He later served on the executive of the New Zealand Rugby Union from 1946 to 1968, and was its chairman between 1962 and 1968. He was also a national selector between 1950 and 1956.

James Douglas Mackay was a New Zealand rugby union player. A wing three-quarter, Mackay represented Wellington at a provincial level, and was a member of the New Zealand national side, the All Blacks, in 1928. He played two matches for the All Blacks, scoring four tries, but did not appear in any internationals.

Frederick Harold Masters was a New Zealand rugby union player. A lock, Masters represented Taranaki at a provincial level, and was a member of the New Zealand national side, the All Blacks, in 1922. He played four matches for the All Blacks, but did not make any Test appearances. He went on to serve as a Taranaki selector during the 1930s, and was a national selector from 1936 to 1937. Masters moved to Australia in 1938 and was a New South Wales and Australian national selector in 1946 and 1947.

Harold Vivian "Toby" Murray was a New Zealand rugby union player. Predominantly a wing-forward, Murray represented Canterbury at a provincial level, and was a member of the New Zealand national side, the All Blacks, in 1913 and 1914. He played 22 matches for the All Blacks including four internationals, scoring 12 tries in all.

Thomas William “Tiger” Lynch was a New Zealand rugby union player. A wing three-quarter, Lynch represented South Canterbury and Southland at a provincial level, and was a member of the New Zealand national side, the All Blacks, in 1913 and 1914. He played 23 matches for the All Blacks including four internationals, scoring 37 tries in all.

James Hislop Parker New Zealand rugby union player (1897-1980)

James Hislop Parker was a New Zealand soldier, sportsman and businessman. He achieved distinction as a sprinter before representing his country at rugby union, including as a member of so-called "Invincibles" team of 1924–25. He was a decorated World War I veteran, and had a business career that included service as chairman of the New Zealand Apple and Pear Marketing Board.

References

  1. Luxford, Bob. "Beau Cottrell". New Zealand Rugby Union. Retrieved 21 June 2015.
  2. "Cottrell repatriated". Auckland Star. 30 September 1944. p. 3. Retrieved 21 June 2015.
  3. Glue, W.A.; Pringle, D.J.C. (1957). Official History of New Zealand in the Second World War 1939–45: 20 Battalion and Armoured Regiment. Wellington: War History Branch, Department of Internal Affairs. p. 280. Retrieved 21 June 2015.
  4. "No. 44486". The London Gazette (Supplement). 1 January 1968. p. 42.