Anthony Masters

Last updated

Anthony Masters
Born9 November 1919
Died10 May 1990
Other namesTony Masters
Occupation Production designer
Set decorator
Years active 1949 - 1987

Anthony Masters (1919 10 May 1990) was a British production designer and set decorator. He was nominated for an Academy Award in the category Best Art Direction for the film 2001: A Space Odyssey . [2]

In film and television, a production designer (PD) is the person responsible for the overall visual look of the production. Production designers have a key creative role in the creation of motion pictures and television. Working directly with the director, cinematographer, and producer, they must select the settings and style to visually tell the story. The term production designer was coined by William Cameron Menzies while he was working on the film Gone with the Wind. Previously the people with the same responsibilities were called art directors. It is sometimes also described as scenic design or set design.

The set decorator is the head of the set decoration department in the film and television industry, responsible for selecting, designing, fabricating, and sourcing the "set dressing" elements of each set in a Feature Film, Television, or New Media episode or commercial, in support of the story and characters of the script. The set decorator is responsible for each décor element inside the sets, from practical lighting, technology, art, furniture, drapery, floor coverings, books, collectables, to exterior furnishings such as satellite dishes, Old West water troughs, streetlamps, traffic lights, garden furniture and sculptures.

Academy Awards American awards given annually for excellence in cinematic achievements

The Academy Awards, also officially and popularly known as the Oscars, are awards for artistic and technical merit in the film industry. Given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), the awards are an international recognition of excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", although more commonly referred to by its nickname "Oscar". The statuette depicts a knight rendered in Art Deco style.

Contents

He was married to actress Heather Sears from 1957 until his death.

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Selected filmography

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References

  1. "Index entry". FreeBMD. ONS. Retrieved 9 October 2011.
  2. "IMDb.com: Anthony Masters - Awards". IMDb.com. Retrieved 27 December 2008.