Anti-Pinkerton Act

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Anti-Pinkerton Act
Great Seal of the United States (obverse).svg
Other short titles Sundry Civil Appropriations Act of 1893
Long title An Act making appropriations for sundry civil expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and ninety-four, and for other purposes.
Acronyms (colloquial) APA
Nicknames Anti-Pinkerton Act of 1893
Enacted by the 52nd United States Congress
Effective March 3, 1893
Citations
Public law 52-208
Statutes at Large 27  Stat.   572 aka 27 Stat. 591
Codification
Titles amended 5 U.S.C.: Government Organization and Employees
U.S.C. sections created 5 U.S.C. ch. 31,subch. I § 3108
Legislative history

The Anti-Pinkerton Act was a law passed by the U.S. Congress in 1893 to limit the federal government's ability to hire private investigators or mercenaries.

Private investigator person hired to undertake investigatory law services

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Mercenary soldier who fights for hire

A mercenary is an individual who is hired to take part in a conflict but is not part of an army or other-governmental organization. Mercenaries fight for money or other forms of payment rather than for political interests. In the last century, mercenaries have increasingly come to be seen as less entitled to protections by rules of war than non-mercenaries. Indeed, the Geneva Conventions declare that mercenaries are not recognized as legitimate combatants and do not have to be granted the same legal protections as captured soldiers of a regular army. In practice, whether or not a person is a mercenary may be a matter of degree, as financial and political interests may overlap, as was often the case among Italian condottieri.

The Anti-Pinkerton Act is contained within 5 U.S.C. 3108 and purports to specifically restrict the government of the United States (as well as that of the District of Columbia) from hiring employees of Pinkerton or similar organizations. In actuality, the United States government is a significant customer of private security service and have made use of private military contractors in the past.

Statement of the Act

That hereafter no employee of the Pinkerton Detective Agency, or similar agency, shall be employed in any Government service or by any officer of the District of Columbia.

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