Antipatrid dynasty

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  Kingdom of Cassander
Other Diadochi
  Kingdom of Seleucus
  Kingdom of Lysimachus
  Kingdom of Ptolemy
   Epirus
Other
   Carthage
   Rome

The Antipatrid dynasty ( /ænˈtɪpətrɪd/ ; Greek : Ἀντιπατρίδαι) was a dynasty of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon founded by Cassander, the son of Antipater, who declared himself King of Macedon in 302 BC. This dynasty did not last long; in 294 BC it was swiftly overthrown by the Antigonid dynasty.

Contents

Members of the Antipatrid dynasty:

Family tree of Antipatrids

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Iollas
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cassander
nobleman
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Antipater
regent of the Empire
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Antigone
Magas of Macedon
nobleman
 
Phila
∞ 1.Balakros
2.Craterus
3.Demetrius I of Macedon
 
Eurydice
Ptolemy I of Egypt
 
Iollas
cup-bearer
 
Cassander
king of Macedon
305-297 BC
Thessalonike
 
Pleistarchus
general
 
Nicaea
∞ 1.Perdiccas
regent of the Empire
2.Lysimachus of Thrace
 
Philip
general
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Berenice I
∞ 1.Philip
nobleman
2.Ptolemy I of Egypt
 
 
 
 
 
Lysandra
 
Alexander V
king of Macedon
297-294 BC
 
Philip IV
king of Macedon
297 BC
 
Antipater II
king of Macedon
297-294 BC
 
Eurydice
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

See also

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