Antonio María Barbieri

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Antonio María Barbieri
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See Montevideo

Antonio María Barbieri, OFM Cap (October 12, 1892 – July 6, 1979), born Alfredo Barbieri, was an Uruguayan Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. He served as Archbishop of Montevideo from 1940 to 1976, and was elevated to the cardinalate.

The Order of Friars Minor Capuchin is an order of friars within the Catholic Church, among the chief offshoots of the Franciscans. The worldwide head of the Order, called the Minister General, is currently Roberto Genuin.

Uruguay republic in South America

Uruguay, officially the Oriental Republic of Uruguay, is a country in the southeastern region of South America. It borders Argentina to its west and Brazil to its north and east, with the Río de la Plata to the south and the Atlantic Ocean to the southeast. Uruguay is home to an estimated 3.44 million people, of whom 1.8 million live in the metropolitan area of its capital and largest city, Montevideo. With an area of approximately 176,000 square kilometres (68,000 sq mi), Uruguay is geographically the second-smallest nation in South America, after Suriname.

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Montevideo archdiocese

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Montevideo is an archdiocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic church in Uruguay.

Contents

Biography

Alfredo Barbieri was born in Montevideo to José and Mariana (née Romano) Barbieri. He had a hesitant start to his ecclesiastical career as his parents were strongly opposed to him becoming a priest, and before eventually entering the religious life Barbieri worked as an insurance clerk. [1] He joined the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin on December 8, 1913, and later moved to Genoa, Italy to continue his novitiate in 1915. Receiving the habit on the following September 8, Barbieri made his solemn profession and took the name Antonio María.

Montevideo Capital city in Uruguay

Montevideo is the capital and largest city of Uruguay. According to the 2011 census, the city proper has a population of 1,319,108 in an area of 201 square kilometres (78 sq mi). The southernmost capital city in the Americas, Montevideo is situated on the southern coast of the country, on the northeastern bank of the Río de la Plata.

Insurance equitable transfer of the risk of a loss, from one entity to another in exchange for payment

Insurance is a means of protection from financial loss. It is a form of risk management, primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent or uncertain loss.

Genoa Comune in Liguria, Italy

Genoa is the capital of the Italian region of Liguria and the sixth-largest city in Italy. In 2015, 594,733 people lived within the city's administrative limits. As of the 2011 Italian census, the Province of Genoa, which in 2015 became the Metropolitan City of Genoa, counted 855,834 resident persons. Over 1.5 million people live in the wider metropolitan area stretching along the Italian Riviera.

He then attended Capuchin houses of study and the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. Barbieri was ordained on December 17, 1921, and obtained his doctorate in theology from the Gregorian on July 9, 1923. He declined a professorship at a prestigious university in Rome and returned to Uruguay, where he served as a pastor in the local Capuchin friary. He was elected superior of this mission in 1931 and re-elected five years later.

Pontifical Gregorian University pontifical university located in Rome, Italy

The Pontifical Gregorian University is a higher education ecclesiastical school located in Rome, Italy. It was originally a part of the Roman College founded in 1551 by Ignatius of Loyola, and included all grades of schooling. The university division of philosophy and theology of the Roman College was given Papal approval in 1556, making it the first university founded by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits). In 1584 the Roman College was given a grandiose new home by Pope Gregory XIII, after whom it was renamed. It was already making its mark not only in sacred but also in natural science.

Rome Capital city and comune in Italy

Rome is the capital city and a special comune of Italy. Rome also serves as the capital of the Lazio region. With 2,872,800 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi), it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth most populous city in the European Union by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4,355,725 residents, thus making it the most populous metropolitan city in Italy. Rome is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber. The Vatican City is an independent country inside the city boundaries of Rome, the only existing example of a country within a city: for this reason Rome has been often defined as capital of two states.

Doctor of Theology is a terminal degree in the academic discipline of theology. The ThD is an advanced research degree equivalent to the Doctor of Philosophy.

On October 6, 1936, Barbieri was appointed Coadjutor Bishop of Montevideo and Titular Bishop of Macra. He received his episcopal consecration on the following November 8 from Archbishop Filippo, with Archbishop Giovanni Aragone and Bishop Alfredo Violas serving as co-consecrators.

Coadjutor bishop position

A coadjutor bishop is a bishop in the Catholic, Anglican, and (historically) Eastern Orthodox churches whose main role is to assist the diocesan bishop in the administration of the diocese. The coadjutor is a bishop himself, although he is also appointed as vicar general. The coadjutor bishop is, however, given authority beyond that ordinarily given to the vicar general, making him co-head of the diocese in all but ceremonial precedence. In modern times, the coadjutor automatically succeeds the diocesan bishop upon the latter's retirement, removal, or death.

A titular bishop in various churches is a bishop who is not in charge of a diocese. By definition, a bishop is an "overseer" of a community of the faithful, so when a priest is ordained a bishop, the tradition of the Roman Catholic and Orthodox churches is that he be ordained for a specific place. There are more bishops than there are functioning dioceses. Therefore, a priest appointed not to head a diocese as its diocesan bishop but to be an auxiliary bishop, a papal diplomat, or an official of the Roman Curia is appointed to a titular see.

Consecrator bishop who makes a person into a priest or another bishop

In the Roman Catholic Church, a consecrator is a bishop who ordains a priest to the episcopal state. The term is also used in Eastern Rite Churches and in Anglican communities.

Barbieri succeeded Aragone as Archbishop of Montevideo on November 20, 1940. Besides his skill in theology, he was also a noted historian, violinist, and essayist. [1] Barbieri was a close associate of Carlos Carmelo Vasconcellos Motta when the first episcopal conferences of Latin American bishops began in the middle 1950s. Pope John XXIII created Barbieri Cardinal Priest of S. Crisogno in the consistory of December 15, 1958, and he thus became the first Uruguayan cardinal.

Theology Study of the nature of deities and religious belief

Theology is the critical study of the nature of the divine. It is taught as an academic discipline, typically in universities and seminaries.

Violin bowed string instrument, usually with four strings tuned in perfect fifths

The violin, sometimes known as a fiddle, is a wooden string instrument in the violin family. Most violins have a hollow wooden body. It is the smallest and highest-pitched instrument in the family in regular use. Smaller violin-type instruments exist, including the violino piccolo and the kit violin, but these are virtually unused. The violin typically has four strings tuned in perfect fifths, and is most commonly played by drawing a bow across its strings, though it can also be played by plucking the strings with the fingers (pizzicato) and by striking the strings with the wooden side of the bow.

Carlos Carmelo Vasconcellos Motta Catholic cardinal

Carlos Carmelo Vasconcellos Motta was a long-serving cardinal. Until Eugênio de Araújo Sales surpassed him in 2005, he was the longest-serving Brazilian cardinal, and during his cardinalate the Church in Brazil underwent tremendous expansion, involving the development of many new movements that were to develop after he had largely disappeared from the scene.

He was one of the cardinal electors in the 1963 conclave, participated in the Second Vatican Council (1962–1965), and during the 1960s was recognised for his long periods of service as a theologian and historian with his promotion to the Instituto Histórico y Geográfico del Uruguay (Historical and Geographical Institute of Uruguay). Barbieri resigned as Montevideo's archbishop on November 17, 1976, after thirty-five years of service. When he turned eighty in 1972, however, the Cardinal was not permitted to attend any future conclaves, and he died quietly less than a year into Pope John Paul II's pontificate, at age 86.

Second Vatican Council Roman Catholic ecumenical council held in Vatican City from 1962 to 1965

The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, commonly known as the Second Vatican Council or Vatican II, addressed relations between the Catholic Church and the modern world. The council, through the Holy See, was formally opened under the pontificate of Pope John XXIII on 11 October 1962 and was closed under Pope Paul VI on the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception on 8 December 1965.

Papal conclave Papal election

A papal conclave is a meeting of the College of Cardinals convened to elect a Bishop of Rome, also known as the pope. The pope is considered by Roman Catholics to be the apostolic successor of Saint Peter and earthly head of the Roman Catholic Church.

Pope John Paul II 264th Pope of the Catholic Church, saint

Pope John Paul II was visible head of the Catholic Church and sovereign of the Vatican City State from 1978 to 2005.

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References

  1. 1 2 TIME Magazine. The New Cardinals December 22, 1958
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Giovanni Francesco Aragone
Archbishop of Montevideo
19401976
Succeeded by
Carlos Parteli Keller